Polestar Forum banner
1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just gone out to my car for the first time in a week.

It is dead - can't open the doors and the little red light is not winking away on the top of the dash.

I assume this is a dead 12V battery?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,429 Posts
Sadly, yes. You can use the hidden blade key to unlock the door, pop the hood, remove the frunk liner, get to the 12 volt battery, and jump the car. But the car will have to go in for a proper repair and update.

I've learned all this from the forum, so I could be wrong. Do contact Polestar first.

Very sorry to hear about this. Keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Prof
Sounds like a call to CS is in order.
First, I have to figure out how this manual key thing works...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,429 Posts
It's a bit of a puzzle. Slide and hold while sliding a different way iirc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
No - it was just sitting there with around 55% SoC on the traction battery.
I thought the recent updates were supposed to have sorted this out? My car has all the recalls and the Dec 20 updates installed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Unfortunately there is still a bug in the software....
So it seems - is this a known thing, or just supposition?

I am going to pull the battery and put it on charge tomorrow - I have an ancient (40+ years old charger in the back of the garage).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
I would say if more than one have the problem it's a bug and yes PS is aware of it.

It's not easy to pull out the battery, I would bought a new charger and charge it in place. You will access the positive cable next main fuses on top of the battery. Connect the negative to the chassis like the top mount of the coilovers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I would say if more than one have the problem it's a bug and yes PS is aware of it.

It's not easy to pull out the battery, I would bought a new charger and charge it in place. You will access the positive cable next main fuses on top of the battery. Connect the negative to the chassis like the top mount of the coilovers.
Should I disconnect the battery if I am going to charge in place?
 

·
Registered
Polestar 2 (Thunder/Slate)
Joined
·
867 Posts
I would say if more than one have the problem it's a bug and yes PS is aware of it.

It's not easy to pull out the battery, I would bought a new charger and charge it in place. You will access the positive cable next main fuses on top of the battery. Connect the negative to the chassis like the top mount of the coilovers.


Should I disconnect the battery if I am going to charge in place?
I generally don’t bother when I charge my ICE cars, I even have connectors to plug them in permanently installed so I don’t even have to open the hood.

If you prefer you can remove the positive pole from the battery before attaching a charger though.

I think it would be easier to just jumpstart it and then let it charge the 12V battery itself.

When I was playing around with mine I confirmed that you don’t even need the 12V battery attached for the 12V stuff to work, it’ll detect this and leave the contactors closed even when it would have normally opened them (eg upon exiting the car) and issue a 12V system warning on the dash.

You just need to briefly provide 12V to start the process.
 

·
Registered
Polestar 2 (Thunder/Slate)
Joined
·
867 Posts
Honestly I don’t get it how this can even be a failure scenario, they’re probably relying too much on software for this and that’s not very clever.

I can’t imagine it would cost more than $5 for simple circuitry that monitors the voltage and enables the onboard 12V charger as a fail safe to mitigate this.

Nowadays I keep a jump starter with me (a NOCO GB40) since I had a number of incidents over the past ten years or so.

I think it’s very silly that I might have to rely on one to start an EV that has a massive propulsion battery.

Even a manual way to close the contactors would work - push something momentarily to connect the high voltage battery, gets the 12V system live, and you’re on your way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Should I disconnect the battery if I am going to charge in place?
No, just charge it in place. But make sure to put gound on chassis. Otherwise the battery monitor sensor (located on the negative battery pole) will not be able to measure the amount of energy going in/out of the battery.

A new charger is preferred as it will follow the charge profile of the battery and not just hit it like a sledgehammer like old heavy chargers did :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Honestly I don’t get it how this can even be a failure scenario, they’re probably relying too much on software for this and that’s not very clever.

I can’t imagine it would cost more than $5 for simple circuitry that monitors the voltage and enables the onboard 12V charger as a fail safe to mitigate this.

Nowadays I keep a jump starter with me (a NOCO GB40) since I had a number of incidents over the past ten years or so.

I think it’s very silly that I might have to rely on one to start an EV that has a massive propulsion battery.

Even a manual way to close the contactors would work - push something momentarily to connect the high voltage battery, gets the 12V system live, and you’re on your way.
I know, but the manufactories looks at as they wouldn't ever start the ICE in order to charge a low 12v battery.
The EV's are still developed with the 12v system as the backbone as this how all components are based on.

You will need to integrate a dc/dc 12v submodule into the high voltage battery in order to get it running without the dependency of the external 12v battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Should I disconnect the battery if I am going to charge in place?
Hi Hugo,
I have a spare modern charger I could drop down to you around lunchtime if that’s of any use.
PM if interested.
Cheers
Matt
 
  • Like
Reactions: toscal353

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,429 Posts
Just took a look at modern chargers. Does anyone know how many amps would be needed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Battery recovery operations currently on hold because it is snowing :(
 

·
Registered
2021 PS2 Void
Joined
·
113 Posts
Honestly I don’t get it how this can even be a failure scenario, they’re probably relying too much on software for this and that’s not very clever.

I can’t imagine it would cost more than $5 for simple circuitry that monitors the voltage and enables the onboard 12V charger as a fail safe to mitigate this.

Nowadays I keep a jump starter with me (a NOCO GB40) since I had a number of incidents over the past ten years or so.

I think it’s very silly that I might have to rely on one to start an EV that has a massive propulsion battery.

Even a manual way to close the contactors would work - push something momentarily to connect the high voltage battery, gets the 12V system live, and you’re on your way.
@kkonstan have you tried hooking up your NOCO GB40 to the Polestar yet? I have one those and love it. Starts everything! I haven't tried yet on the Polestar so just curious.
 

·
Registered
Polestar 2 (Thunder/Slate)
Joined
·
867 Posts
I know, but the manufactories looks at as they wouldn't ever start the ICE in order to charge a low 12v battery.
The EV's are still developed with the 12v system as the backbone as this how all components are based on.

You will need to integrate a dc/dc 12v submodule into the high voltage battery in order to get it running without the dependency of the external 12v battery.
there is a dc/dc already, it works in lieu of an alternator when the high voltage pack is active. The trouble is to activate this you need sufficient voltage to flip the contactors over.

My argument is the car should do this even if not being driven or charged - either periodically, or as a response to low voltage on the 12v side.
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top