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I think what's needed right now, highest priority, are plentiful, reliable, charging locations.
Drove to Birmingham, AL today. Metro population reported as 1.15 million.

There is one (1!) non-Tesla DC charger in the entire metro area, with 4 stalls.

And of course it鈥檚 all Signet chargers there. 馃え I would drive 100 mi just to TRY a fast charge, but there isn鈥檛 one that close to me!

I haven鈥檛 needed to DC charge, so it鈥檚 cool, but frustrating the infrastructure is so poor here.
 

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Yeah. I sometimes think that I'm not really an early adopter here. The i3, the Volt, Prius, Teslas... EVs are not new in this country. But when you look around for fast chargers, it's such a random, weird, disorganized mess... Then I realize we're all on the leading edge here still.
 
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Yeah. I sometimes think that I'm not really an early adopter here. The i3, the Volt, Prius, Teslas... EVs are not new in this country. But when you look around for fast chargers, it's such a random, weird, disorganized mess... Then I realize we're all on the leading edge here still.
Teslas had/have their own network which is why they flourished. The i3 and Volt gave the true EV experience but on training wheels because they had backup engines when needed. The Prius I barely consider even in the EV league. The engine was still the main propulsion system. Even today a lot of the PHEVs don't operate like real EVs. The only way to get pure EV driving out of most is to go very light on the pedal. Otherwise you still get the engine kicking in.
 

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If I had to do the OP's trip today ... I would defiantly go for it and probably make it no problem.

However, if I had to do it before I took my Xmas trip, I would have been very worried and cautious too!

You need an understating on how the car works on a long trip, and without that long trip experience you lack the data to know that you can (or can't) make it.

I suggest to the OP as soon as you can take a trip away where you are not worried if it takes 4 of 6 hours. Plan some charging stops, have at least once back up for each stop, and then Go.
Once completed you'll have a greater understanding on how far the car will based on your driving style. If you go fast ... go fast ... if you like braking late and hard, do it, etc... only once you have done that first trip will you have the data you need to plan future trips.
 

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Wisdom from the Gdankster. Gather round children, and learn.
 
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In hindsight my first trip ever in my car being 1100 mi. was a trial by fire and probably more risky than I would have thought. I had to learn very quickly but now I'm glad I did it. I have no range anxiety at all - I just know I need to plan and have a backup as well. And it's the worst it will be now, charging infrastructure will improve, the car will be tweaked through software at least, and the incompatibilities will be fixed (read: Signet chargers).
 

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have at least once back up for each stop
I just know I need to plan and have a backup as well.
These are the only things that make me nervous. There is not enough certainty that any given charger really works, or is working that day, or is not iced. And frequently there isn't another charger for many, many miles.
 

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These are the only things that make me nervous. There is not enough certainty that any given charger really works, or is working that day, or is not iced. And frequently there isn't another charger for many, many miles.
Agreed! @GDank, I really tried. I spent a lot of time on PlugShare trying to figure out contingency plans, especially since there have been situations where an accident, construction or traffic can add hours to the same trip. However, as you saw from the map that @polerad provided, there aren't any decent options in the area where I was traveling. Even the L2 chargers are inconveniently located compared to the highway and as I was checking each location,

I found the majority had one or two plugs, were in private establishments like dealerships, hotels and a few had no reported check-ins for years. I shudder at the thought of making the same run during rush-hour. One day it will all come together between the range, charging consistency and planning. Until then, we'll continue to enjoy the PS2 locally, without a care while being selective about the types of longer journeys we take through our charging-desert.
 

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I think if you plan to charge at 20%, that gives plenty of buffer for bouncing around to other chargers if the first one doesn't work for you.

It is all a bit of an adventure, but I'm ok with it and hope things will get much better quickly.
 
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I spent a lot of time on PlugShare trying to figure out contingency plans
It will be nice when contingency plans are not needed at all.

I shudder at the thought of making the same run during rush-hour.
Actually during rush hour your usage will likely go down significantly. An EV uses almost no energy sitting in traffic, or crawling at 5,10, or 20 mph. The killer is speed. If you are running low on range, the general rule is: slow down.
 

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Really! That is reassuring. I thought the short stints would burn kWhs like in local driving.
The ICE usage curve vs. speed is like a parabola with a sweet spot at around 45mph. The EV usage curve is more hyperbolic at the high end, and somewhat flatter at the low end. If the P2 had a real-time usage meter you'd be able to see how much juice you were using at a crawl or standing still. It is very little. Again, if you are short on range to make the next charging station -- slow down!

As a test, unplug and hang out in your garage with the radio on for an hour and see how much juice you use up (after the car is warmed up of course ;))
 

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As I know has been said a lot around here, the car will spend a lot of energy keeping the heat on, but less there, too, when stopped or at a crawl. Not that I wish it on anyone, but a traffic jam on a cool summer day is probably about perfect for an EV.
 
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When I bought my first EV in 2014, there was only one CCS fast charger anywhere near me. I seriously debated whether to spend the extra $500 (IIRC) for DCFC capability on the car. I did, and was very glad I did as the number of CCS charging exploded in the years since.

As @**** said, you just need to have a plan and a backup. The P*2鈥檚 range (at least compared to my 65-80 mile range i3) and built-in Google maps help with both.

FWIW, in 6+ years of driving the i3, there was only one time (in 2020, ironically) that I wasn鈥檛 able to complete a planned trip. It was a combination of both Plan A and Plan B failing (neither DCFC charger worked) and having to be at my destination in time for a meeting which ruled out using L2s.

Of course everyone鈥檚 situation & experience is different, so this post isn鈥檛 intended to shame anyone. But my experience has been that once you鈥檙e comfortable with what your car can do, a couple of simple tools like Plugshare, and doing some minor pre-planning, range will be a non-issue.
 

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the car will spend a lot of energy keeping the heat on,
Once your car is warm even this usage will be relatively low unless it's subzero outside. EVs don't come with heated seats and steering wheels to appear high-end, they are necessities for reducing radiant heat needs and improving range.
 
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