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45k GBP doesn’t strike me as “young family starting out” territory. It’s only 5k off of the Polestar which is considered to be fairly expensive
Just a couple of sentences where I'm coming from with my opinion. Maybe I extrapolated a tad too much what I see in Norway among my social circle - mostly DINKs who have worked for about 5 years, and have already long paid off their study loans. Also, electric cars are objectively cheap here. A brand new Polestar 2 is 39.5K GBP in Norway (source), for instance. You don't even get a decently spec'ed 1.5L Ford Focus for that money (source), let alone the running costs for electric being a fifth of fossil cars. There are also not so many used electric vehicles which are spacious and future-proof in this price range. Ioniq 5 might start around 32K GBP here, with "Project 45" being around 42K GBP.

What Ioniq 5 has that Polestar 2 doesn't for young couples is space, and lots of it. Word on the DINK street is that Polestar 2 is not suitable for 2 babies' equipment, whereas Ioniq 5 should be enough. It's a similar rationale behind Audi eTron being Norway's best selling car of 2020, not just electric, but overall.

As you said, I am likely wrong to have this opinion in general; 45K GBP is indeed quite a bit of money relatively speaking for the UK. I should have specified that I was talking about the Norwegian market. 🙂
 

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Just a couple of sentences where I'm coming from with my opinion. Maybe I extrapolated a tad too much what I see in Norway among my social circle - mostly DINKs who have worked for about 5 years, and have already long paid off their study loans. Also, electric cars are objectively cheap here. A brand new Polestar 2 is 39.5K GBP in Norway (source), for instance. You don't even get a decently spec'ed 1.5L Ford Focus for that money (source), let alone the running costs for electric being a fifth of fossil cars. There are also not so many used electric vehicles which are spacious and future-proof in this price range. Ioniq 5 might start around 32K GBP here, with "Project 45" being around 42K GBP.

What Ioniq 5 has that Polestar 2 doesn't for young couples is space, and lots of it. Word on the DINK street is that Polestar 2 is not suitable for 2 babies' equipment, whereas Ioniq 5 should be enough. It's a similar rationale behind Audi eTron being Norway's best selling car of 2020, not just electric, but overall.

As you said, I am likely wrong to have this opinion in general; 45K GBP is indeed quite a bit of money relatively speaking for the UK. I should have specified that I was talking about the Norwegian market. 🙂
If the IONIQ5 with its cargo space was functionally at a similar cost as the Kia Niro EV (~US$300/mo 0 down for a 36 mo lease, $450/mo for 72mo finance) then yeah that seems about right for the "young family with 2 kids" market. Although would point out that a Niro ICE or RAV4 ICE is $10-15k cheaper than the NiroEV - literally 1/3 cheaper!
Will be interesting to see what price point they come at here and in the other markets.

In Norway it seems that EVs and ICEs are functionally at price parity, if not with EVs being cheaper. Here EVs are still significantly more expensive than ICE, even with incentives and fuel savings. You have to do Enron-level accounting to argue that EVs make pure financial sense here.
 

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not an Android Automotive OS.... what's the point...;-)
A very good looking car, nice retro design and all goodies, but yet to be on the road for initial reviews...
 

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I admit to being drawn to the Ioniq 5. Much as I love the styling, performance and handling of my ps2 Android Automotive has yet to provide much beyond Google Maps, reliability is scary and charging is slower than hoped for.

As a past E-Niro owner the Hyundai brand doesn’t bother me and the styling and cabin have certainly moved away from traditional Far Eastern looks, for me the next best design after PS2 and iPace. Range and charging won’t be an issue, dealers have a good reputation, 5 year unlimited mileage warranty plus 8 years on the battery, loads more space, performance not far off the PS2. Then there’s the cup holder thing, HUD and ability to get my 67 year old 6’ 5” frame in and out without as much struggle. Ability to run 240v items from it and charge other cars - every non-budget EV should have that.

Seriously tempted.
 

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A spyshot of the IONIQ5 shows a more normal exterior, and presumably interior, compared to the concept and press release pics:
https://www.reddit.com/r/electricvehicles/comments/lrvkkx
This is either good or bad I guess. To me it’s net good although I prefer the polestar still.

A polestar with the range/charging efficiency (minus the battery issues) and with the cargo capacity of the Hyundai/Kia offerings sounds great.
 

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I actually love the looks of the Ioniq 5 (inside and out), though in photos the proportions looks like a compact hatchback, but in reality the size is more like an SUV. It has a nice balance of modern clean lines and creases (but not as over-styled and gaudy as a Lexus or a Lambo Urus), and subtle retro elements. The side creases are more resolved on this car than say a Urus or Hyundia’s own Elantra.
Very impressive for a Hyundai. I’m curious why the styling of the Ioniq line is so varied and doesn’t have a consistent design theme -- their future models looks more smooth and rounded unlike the Ioniq 5.
 

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I'm a bit more excited by the Kia EV6: 2022 Kia EV6: What We Know So Far
starting at $45k and apparently on sale in the Fall.

Based on the teaser images it looks like a longer version of the Ioniq5, with styling I think I prefer. Also, while I'm sure they'll market it as a crossover/SUV, based on where it seems the wheel arches are, it looks more like a lifted wagon, kind of like the Polestar 2 is a lifted hatch/sedan. In that case this could be the BEV wagon I've always wanted. Lots still TBD, but 800V architecture and history of great range/efficiency in the company is fairly compelling so long as the exterior/interior styling jives with us. Wouldn't be in a rush to get a 2nd EV or to trade in the Polestar or anything. But could see looking this way in a couple years, or whenever we're tired of having a backup ICE.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Kia and Hyundai have a you go then I go system. So I suspect this is the Ioniq 5 in new cloths.

The e-Niro and Kona are based on the same platform. They both share R&D costs, so engines, battery tech, platform, etc... Are all shared to split costs.

I'd be shocked to see this be that different to the Ioniq 5.

I've had two Kia's that were fantastic at the job I brought them for, the local dealership isn't too far and the people there are great. So I'd buy one in a instant - in fact if the e-Niro had a tow bar I'd probably be driving that.
 

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The main difference for me between an Ionic 5 and a P2 is that the P2 has the safety of Volvo behind it while the Hyundai has the ability to fold like a tin can. It's a nice looking car as far as I'm concerned, but I would pause before buying one for close to the cost of a P2.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
The main difference for me between an Ionic 5 and a P2 is that the P2 has the safety of Volvo behind it while the Hyundai has the ability to fold like a tin can. It's a nice looking car as far as I'm concerned, but I would pause before buying one for close to the cost of a P2.
Not sure about folding like a tin can ... they often get 5 Star Euro Ncap ratings.
 

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Not sure about folding like a tin can ... they often get 5 Star Euro Ncap ratings.
Tests vs. real life are two different things. It's easy the cheat the test and make a car that can pass when you know what a pass means. It's a lot harder to make cars that hold up in real crashes. Volvo is the only car company in the world that actually goes out to real crashes in Sweden to analyze what went wrong and how they can protect against it. This type of analysis is prohibitive elsewhere because of legal issues. I have purchased other cars over the years, but always feel safer in my Volvos. Anecdotally, wrap on the door panel of a Hyundai (or Honda for that matter) and then on a Volvo/PS. You'll get an idea of the gauge of steel they use.
 

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I think Volvo is definitely the standard for safety, and part of why we have brand preference/loyalty for them.

but the Japanese and Korean automakers aren’t that far behind and have a better track record compared to the other American/European OEMs by and large. Looking at IIHS top safety picks you typically see - in addition to basically every Volvo - a bunch of Subarus, Mazdas, Toyotas, Hondas, and yes Hyundai/Kias.

The meme that Asian manufacturers produce low quality cheap pieces of crap is a holdover from decades ago. If anything I’d more likely apply that moniker to certain American/European OEMs
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Well, I wouldn't have used the word "often".
The 3 stars are lack of pedestrian safety... it's now 3 Stars + 2 more Pedestrian and Autonomous systems.

Everything from 2010 has 5 Stars except the real budget i10, and that loses out because of automated system like PED or Auto-Braking.
 

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The meme that Asian manufacturers produce low quality cheap pieces of crap is a holdover from decades ago. If anything I’d more likely apply that moniker to certain American/European OEMs
I'm old enough to remember when anything made in Japan was disparaged. People laughed at the first Honda cars in the 70's. Then Honda began to dominate the market and the American car companies went over to try to figure out how the hell they were achieving such high quality. To this day, I'd rather have a Honda engine in a generator, lawn mower, etc... than anything else.

After Japan got some respect, people mocked things made in China. Well here I am with a Chinese car that seems very well made. And the Kia and Hyundai cars have great design, good aesthetics, solid performance.

The worst car I ever drove was one I rented, and it was an American car. I can't remember the name now. I thought I was going to bend the sheet metal just closing the trunk lid. The thing felt like it was going to shake itself apart above 60 mph. God it was an awful car.
 
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I think Volvo is definitely the standard for safety, and part of why we have brand preference/loyalty for them.

but the Japanese and Korean automakers aren’t that far behind and have a better track record compared to the other American/European OEMs by and large. Looking at IIHS top safety picks you typically see - in addition to basically every Volvo - a bunch of Subarus, Mazdas, Toyotas, Hondas, and yes Hyundai/Kias.

The meme that Asian manufacturers produce low quality cheap pieces of crap is a holdover from decades ago. If anything I’d more likely apply that moniker to certain American/European OEMs
Again, tests vs real world performance. And this is not to say asian cars aren't a quality product. Honda is tops. But safety is a different matter. Once I learned about what Volvo does, and is able to do, I realized they were in a different class. I recommend anyone interested to research this. It's fascinating.
 
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