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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is anybody charging off something like this: 32 amp switched interlock 3 pin socket 220V - 250V IP67 2P+E waterproof blue single phase interlocked connector 32A: Amazon.co.uk: Welcome

And using it with a OHME charger plugged in, instead of a dedicated EV charger?

My initial plan was to charge off the 10amp mains socket which I know is really slow. However, recent events where I was driving 120 miles a day unexpectedly after a family bereavement has made me realise it's worth having a faster charger at home.

However, the house I am currently in is rented, and we're looking to buy our own place at some point this year, and so I don't want to spend a lot on a dedicated charger for my landlords house (he is fine with me installing one).

I thought this would be the cheapest short-term home charging option until we move and then I can take advantage of the Home charger grant.

The first leccy I enquired with possibly didn't understand the brief, as he came back to me and said:

There's quite a few regulations for E.V Chargers, so probably best if I go through them with you, and see what works best for you.
 

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A few guys at work with Hybrids and T****s were doing just this with a couple of 32A commando plugs outside one of the buildings. They just got a Commando to Type 2 short cable and plugged their normal cable into that....
Don't believe there is anything to stop you, you just lose out on any bells and whistles the charging point might give (which eventually hopefully the Polestar 2 will provide natively)
As long as its wired in by an electrician and is all done to approved standards.
 

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I am renting as well - I got an untethered charger installed (with permission from the landlord) with the grant and I will take it with me when I leave. I will leave the electrical installation part (i.e. Garo device / mini consumer unit) and just get someone in to disconnect the charger and make everything safe.

If you have the commando socket installed and use the Commando Ohme cable, there's no real difference between that and having a 'fixed' charge point installed.

I went for the fixed install because I needed a longer cable run to the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Lot of hassle though, getting it removed before the next tenant moves in and then re-installed on your own property.

I imagine it ends up costing more.
 

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Is anybody charging off something like this: 32 amp switched interlock 3 pin socket 220V - 250V IP67 2P+E waterproof blue single phase interlocked connector 32A: Amazon.co.uk: Welcome

And using it with a OHME charger plugged in, instead of a dedicated EV charger?

My initial plan was to charge off the 10amp mains socket which I know is really slow. However, recent events where I was driving 120 miles a day unexpectedly after a family bereavement has made me realise it's worth having a faster charger at home.

However, the house I am currently in is rented, and we're looking to buy our own place at some point this year, and so I don't want to spend a lot on a dedicated charger for my landlords house (he is fine with me installing one).

I thought this would be the cheapest short-term home charging option until we move and then I can take advantage of the Home charger grant.

The first leccy I enquired with possibly didn't understand the brief, as he came back to me and said:
It’s quite possible he understood the brief and was concerned about safety aspects. Proper earthing is something you should investigate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, whatever needs doing needs doing

I'm not trying to circumvent safety regs, I just didn't realise the same regs applied to commando sockets but maybe they do.
 

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Thats the way Ive done mine, did my first home charge the other day, switched on at 5.00pm and the Ohme started charging on Octopus Go @ 5p during the early hours and worked perfectly.
 

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I'm using an Ohme on a 32A commando - been faultless.

It's all installed inside the garage out of sight, and the cable exits through the door frame.
 

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Commando plus Ohme here too. Works a treat although I’m still waiting for the ability to export charge history from the app (if that matters to you). It’s a very small and neat solution.
 

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I've got an energy monitor (Shelly EM) on the feed to the charger and monitor the energy use from that.

I say I monitor the energy use... I monitored it a couple of times, then got bored of it and haven't looked at it since!
 

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My understanding is that there are special requirements for charging EVs outdoors, relating to grounding.

Some EVSEs, like all granny chargers and my PodPoint, have circuitry that would detect these failure scenarios and disconnect power. Many, like the Ohme do not.

If an Ohme is installed properly, in most U.K. properties that would mean installing a dedicated ground to it to satisfy regulations.

If you just plug it in at a commando socket, it is not up to spec and is dangerous in limited but specific circumstances.

This is the reason why no electrician that knows the regulations would install a commando socket if told that the intention is to use it to charge EVs in an outdoor setting (eg socket in garage, car outside).

The TL;DR plain english summary of the problem is that most houses in the U.K. do not have a ground spike, but have ground linked to neutral before the meter. That means only neutral and live go from the property to the substation, where it is grounded. If there is a cable fault and neutral is damaged, your house is no longer grounded. That’s OK within the house as everything grounded would be connected so you won’t get shocked, but if you are outside and touch an EV charging and grounded to the house you risk closing the circuit to earth yourself, which would most likely be fatal. That would not be the case if the car charger was using a proper earth spike, and there was a minimum separation between the car and anything that might be grounded at the house (gas pipes, water taps, metal outdoor lights etc).

This failure mode is very unlikely, but the specs are there to mitigate this, and I recommend that you check with a qualified sparky that is familiar with EV requirements.
 

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It's entirely possible to do a commando based install that's still perfectly safe. It is, after all, only an additional connection between the supply and the EVSE.

You don't need a ground spike for a safe Ohme install (whether commando or hard wired) - there are alternative ways of achieving compliance.

Ohme have a guide for electricians - I've attached it.
 

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I'm using an Ohme on a 32A commando - been faultless.

It's all installed inside the garage out of sight, and the cable exits through the door frame.
Same. The app is a bit meh, but does the job and works with Octopus Agile for cheap charging.
 

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It's entirely possible to do a commando based install that's still perfectly safe. It is, after all, only an additional connection between the supply and the EVSE.

You don't need a ground spike for a safe Ohme install (whether commando or hard wired) - there are alternative ways of achieving compliance.

Ohme have a guide for electricians - I've attached it.
Of course it is possible to do a commando based install that's compliant with the regulations, and I can see why many would prefer this, but the point of my post was to stress that it involves more than just having a commando socket installed in your garage.

Regulation 722.411.4.1 does not allow PME to be used to supply an EV charging point located outdoors, or that might be used to charge a vehicle located outdoors, unless certain conditions are met.

There are a few options, cheapest is a low resistance earth for the charging point, but where that's not possible any means to detect PEN conductor failure are also acceptable. That's what the PodPoint I've got installed has built-in for instance, but many (like the Ohme) don't, and need a separate device at a cost (eg the Matt:e).

If your garage has a commando socket, do not assume that you can just plug in an an Ohme or similar with a commando socket and charge your car outdoors. On a PME system this is against the regulation and unsafe.

If you plan to install a commando socket intending to use it to charge your car outdoors, make sure to explicitly state to the electrician that it will be used for this purpose so any additional work required is done.

I'll end this post exactly like the previous one, with a recommendation that you check with a qualified sparky (ie definitely not me!) that is familiar with EV requirements, to make sure your charging setup is legal and safe.
 

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I'd argue than having open PEN detection is far safer than relying on a ground rod. Ground rods can deteriorate or corrode, and their performance can change throughout the year depending on the ground condition.

What people need to be aware of is that these devices are -not- expensive. Then O-PEN one is only £100 and that includes a metal consumer unit and RCBO You'd generally need a CU anyway so almost all of that is a sunk cost to start with.

Problem is that everyone is jumping on the EV bandwagon and ripping people off.

The extra cost for a sparky to incorporate open PEN detection into a commando install is less than fifty quid, if that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
How much should this all cost?

So far I've been quoted £780! and £472

And then I've got to buy an OHME cable for £199.99
 

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Hard to say because we've not seen your property. First one seems steep. Second one is in the expected ballpark I'd say.

A day's labour and £200 parts? Well you're not far off £472 there I guess...
 
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