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'22 Midnight | SMLR | Pilot | Plus | 19"
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who have opted to get a 12-volt jump starter as a backup device to keep in the car, what did you get and how do you choose? I did a little internet research and ended up even more confused. All the descriptions talk about what's needed to crank the engine. That's obviously not how you'd be using it on a Polestar 2. I saw one post where someone mentioned they had a NOCO GB20. There's an awful lot of options out there, any advice is appreciated.
 

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For those who have opted to get a 12-volt jump starter as a backup device to keep in the car, what did you get and how do you choose? I did a little internet research and ended up even more confused. All the descriptions talk about what's needed to crank the engine. That's obviously not how you'd be using it on a Polestar 2. I saw one post where someone mentioned they had a NOCO GB20. There's an awful lot of options out there, any advice is appreciated.
There’s plenty out there and NOCO is a good brand, I’d personally get a 2000a version rather than a 1000a as someone on here posted the 1000a (the gb20 is a 500a) for very low after one start. The prices vary in the UK for £99 for 1000a and £120 to £200 for 2000a.

I have purchased a NOCO boost HD GB70 2000A 12v
 

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There’s plenty out there and NOCO is a good brand, I’d personally get a 2000a version rather than a 1000a as someone on here posted the 1000a (the gb20 is a 500a) for very low after one start. The prices vary in the UK for £99 for 1000a and £120 to £200 for 2000a.

I have purchased a NOCO boost HD GB70 2000A 12v
I just used a fully charged NOCO GB40 yesterday. It takes a while after boot before you will successfully be able to connect the main battery charging cable and start charging (assuming you're at a charger), and as soon as I did this, I disconnected the GB40 and it was 3/4 discharged. So I would be nervous with anything much smaller.

I'm not actually sure how it works if you cannot connect to a main battery charger, because after I got a boost from a tow truck, the car powered up fine, but as soon as he removed the booster cables, it died instantly. So it seems like if your 12V is actually dead, you may need to start charging the main battery right away, so that it starts charging the 12V.

Can anyone confirm this?
 

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I just used a fully charged NOCO GB40 yesterday. It takes a while after boot before you will successfully be able to connect the main battery charging cable and start charging (assuming you're at a charger), and as soon as I did this, I disconnected the GB40 and it was 3/4 discharged. So I would be nervous with anything much smaller.

I'm not actually sure how it works if you cannot connect to a main battery charger, because after I got a boost from a tow truck, the car powered up fine, but as soon as he removed the booster cables, it died instantly. So it seems like if your 12V is actually dead, you may need to start charging the main battery right away, so that it starts charging the 12V.

Can anyone confirm this?
Taken from manual: “The car cannot be started if the high voltage battery is discharged. If both the 12 V battery and the high voltage battery are discharged, both batteries have to be charged. It is not possible to charge just the high voltage battery first in this case. The 12 V battery needs a certain charge level so that the high voltage battery can charge”

As stated above plugging in won’t help if the 12v is dead as car won’t start charging, so the way you did it by keeping the booster connected is a work around but still not ideal, as the 12v should really be charged fully before charging the Main battery just to be safe.

The 12v on the P2 should never die as the main battery pack should always top it up, but it won’t top up without being powered up, if the car isn’t going to sleep it will drain the 12v, unless it’s on charge. Locking the car helps the car go to sleep faster preserving the 12v
 

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For those who have opted to get a 12-volt jump starter as a backup device to keep in the car, what did you get and how do you choose? I did a little internet research and ended up even more confused. All the descriptions talk about what's needed to crank the engine. That's obviously not how you'd be using it on a Polestar 2. I saw one post where someone mentioned they had a NOCO GB20. There's an awful lot of options out there, any advice is appreciated.
Any 12V source should work since you just need it to run the 12V accessories long enough for the controllers to turn on the main DC-DC and power the 12V system. However I did notice many of the 12V boosters won't go into their 12V jump start mode if they are below 60% charge, so you have to keep them topped up. A larger one will have a bigger battery that will go longer between needing to be topped up.

If both your main battery and 12V are dead, then you are hooped. The only way to recover from that is to plug into charge.

Given that, I'm not sure the scenario where the booster is actually helpful.
If you have a 12V battery failure (dead cell, weird parasitic drain, etc) the booster will activate the 12V system so the main High Voltage pack can turn on and run the car and the 12V system. But there is a risk, like with an ICE car, that once you shut down again the 12V battery will not hold the charge and you are back where you started.

I carry a booster with me on road trips where recovery is going to be hours away. I also carry the physical key so I can open the driver's door and pop the frunk to grab the booster and hook it to the 12V jump points. Hopefully, this never needs to be used, but it is cheap insurance and weighs almost nothing!
 

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If your battery is not completely knackered with voltage above 12V … any booster should do, since a little help is needed. But it your battery is really depleted or damaged, even a large one will not help, since they are not meant to charge your empty 12V battery.
 

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If your battery is not completely knackered with voltage above 12V … any booster should do, since a little help is needed. But it your battery is really depleted or damaged, even a large one will not help, since they are not meant to charge your empty 12V battery.
You might be surprised how robust a lead battery can be. Even with a lot of sulphation or a shorted cell, a short blast of current can give enough surface charge to turn that starter motor over or, in this case, just enough juice to close those high voltage contactors and get the DC-DC on. Of course once you get that car back on you need to drive somewhere to get a new 12V battery right away!

Note that a well built 12V lithium battery won't let you shock it back to life like that, but a 12V booster should still give the system enough bump to get that critical DC-DC back on, though there should be all sorts of 12V battery warnings at that point. Unlike lead, that overdischarged lithium battery should be immediately disposed of. Why is that? Well, that's a whole other write up.
 

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Oh I know they can be, but they also can show 12V and not take charge as needed…you simply never know wha the plates are doing or not, until you know one day.

12V lithium doesn't really exist afaik….. they have to be built as 4S LiFePO4 (14.4V) with obviously BMS watching over it… so no, boosting as we know it would not work. But the chances the BMS would let that out of whack in the first place are slim in my opinion. But Lithium is a different game as you said.

I have nothing against lead acid, as long as topping off works reliably with no unexpected drain present.
 

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I used both a GB40 (had it for my ICE) and a GB20 (bought it after I had 12V issues with the Polestar to keep in the frunk). Both work fine, just check up their charge status every six months or so.

For those wondering what to do with them, with a completely dead 12V battery all you need to do is connect it up and force the car to bring the high voltage battery online and engage the DC-DC converter.

It’s literally the equivalent of cranking an ICE to get the alternator to generate power.

All you need to do is put the car in drive. From a cold boot it will take some time to finish safety tests before it will let you do that, so just keep trying to put it in drive until it lets you, then you can put it in park again and go disconnect it and close the frunk before driving away.

A 20-30 min drive should be enough to charge it sufficiently to not be at risk of needing to jumpstart it again, leaving it plugged in on an AC charge at home overnight should top up both but if you have a car charger it’s a good idea to use that (that’s what Polestar recommends in the manual too).

FWIW I have a CTEK MXS5.0, and used it overnight the last time I had to do the above, six months later no issues.

Hopefully it won’t happen again but I’ve had a 12V discharge happen at least once with all the cars I’ve ever owned with the exception of my A5 Cabriolet which somehow keeps going strong after nearly 9 years! Conditioning it with the CTEK every few months might be helping.
 

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'22 Midnight | SMLR | Pilot | Plus | 19"
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I used both a GB40 (had it for my ICE) and a GB20 (bought it after I had 12V issues with the Polestar to keep in the frunk). Both work fine, just check up their charge status every six months or so.

For those wondering what to do with them, with a completely dead 12V battery all you need to do is connect it up and force the car to bring the high voltage battery online and engage the DC-DC converter.

It’s literally the equivalent of cranking an ICE to get the alternator to generate power.

All you need to do is put the car in drive. From a cold boot it will take some time to finish safety tests before it will let you do that, so just keep trying to put it in drive until it lets you, then you can put it in park again and go disconnect it and close the frunk before driving away.

A 20-30 min drive should be enough to charge it sufficiently to not be at risk of needing to jumpstart it again, leaving it plugged in on an AC charge at home overnight should top up both but if you have a car charger it’s a good idea to use that (that’s what Polestar recommends in the manual too).

FWIW I have a CTEK MXS5.0, and used it overnight the last time I had to do the above, six months later no issues.

Hopefully it won’t happen again but I’ve had a 12V discharge happen at least once with all the cars I’ve ever owned with the exception of my A5 Cabriolet which somehow keeps going strong after nearly 9 years! Conditioning it with the CTEK every few months might be helping.
Thanks! Very helpful.
 

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Went with Solvtin on Amazon….
SOLVTIN S6 Jump Starter 1200A Car Starter for up to 7.5L Gas and 6.0L Diesel Engine 12V Battery Jump Starter with Smart Jumper Cables Portable Power Bank with PD 18W, QC 3.0 Port and LED Light
 
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