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Would you buy another Polestar (of any type/model)?

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... they are no worse than any other major player.
That is a painful fact. I have had serious issues with Chevrolet, BMW, Audi, Mini, and Volvo sales and service. Hyundai has been outstanding.
 

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I’m 100% sure my next car will also be a polestar, just as i was 100% sure i will only drive BMW after my first bmw, which i changed in a audi a6 and then i was definitely sure i will never drive anything else then audi. And then came polestar..



Have a Merc b class electric as second car, im 100 % sure that i will never have that again...



For me the triggers are design, design, quality and driving performance.
 

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The plastic covers at the back of the front seats in particular are already terribly scratched
I agree with that statement, there have been very few back seat passengers in my car and the plastic seat backs look mottled and scratched.
 

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I have been a longtime Volvo customer (4 x XC90’s and 1 x XC60). An XC90 T8, a Polestar 2 and a BMW i3 33kWh (BEV version) currently sit in my driveway. My loyalty to Volvo has actually been loyalty to the local dealer that has always been brilliant. I also get their service for my Polestar 2 (and that was a factor in the P* purchase), but the whole dealing with Polestar customer services experience has not been good.

I like the Polestar 2, but I also like the BMW i3 - both of them are great cars for different reasons. I would recommend an i3 in a heartbeat to anyone. My i3 has only had one minor warranty claim (lacquer issue on an alloy wheel) and has been completely reliable for the four years we have owned it. I cannot say the same about the five months of Polestar ownership.

I am definitely sold on BEVs. They work for me as I rarely do more than 100 miles in a day - when I do need to do a long journey I take the XC90. Hence I am totally sold on the BEV as a second car. We need to see the public charging infrastructure get vastly better before I would fully commit to only having a BEV.

The Polestar is a bit lost. It is crazy fast, but that’s not really what it does best as it is just too heavy to be that agile car that you want to blast along B roads. It is, however, a very comfortable small saloon that is very quiet and refined and at its best chewing up motorway miles. Except that it has a realistic range of 180 miles which means it is NOT suitable as a motorway cruiser.

In some ways I actually prefer driving the i3 - it’s weirdly enjoyable to drive and definitely positioned well as that “second car”. I keep thinking about swapping it for an i3s 44kWh (and pocketing the considerable difference in price) as I think it would be a better alternative in many ways for the driving I do. It would also mean that I could skip the early adopter pain that we’re all currently going through.

Summary - no, I wouldn’t recommend one, and unless they get considerably better over the next 3 years I wouldn’t buy another.
 

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Based on my experience so far (which has been largely trouble-free, aside from the sort of glitches I'd expect from v1.0 of anything), I'd definitely buy one again. It's exactly what I was looking for in a BEV.
 

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Despite the empty words from Inglenath, they clearly don't give a toss about the customer. In their defence however, they are no worse than any other major player.
I actually think the situation is the opposite: they care deeply but don’t have the ops and experience developed yet to deliver a flawless experience. I believe there is the desire to get there, and we’ll see if they end up capable of execution as the company grows.

Would I buy again? I certainly think I’ll closely consider what Polestar are offering when it’s time to trade. I’m especially interested in Precept, which is probably going to be the first whole-cloth offering from the company.

That said, I’ll look at what’s out there. Do NOT get me wrong: I love the car. But it certainly won my business by being the only credible performance EV that isn’t a Tesla in 2020, with the exception of a Taycan at $125K+. If I were buying a year later, i4 and e-tron GT would be given test drives. 3 years from now, who knows what’s electrified.
 

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I have had an i3 before the P2 and much prefer the P2. Its a great looking car which is lovely to drive blips has a decent size boot making it practical. I get the odd tech issue or rattle but can't say I am overly fussed and have not had to take it in for any work so far.. Main disappointment is the range but careful driving gets me 250 miles comfortably which is fine. Other than that, as above, I could do with CarPlay and timed charging as 2 critical functions - versus phone-as-a-key etc which don't really matter as I am fine to carry the big box key along with my other keys.
Overall I would buy again but the car would need to stack up well against the germans as am sure they will be 'leading the way' by the time I come to renew
 

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I’d get one again. But it depends on what else is available at that time - and what we’re interested in getting.

first, definitely only BEV from here on out. Our infrastructure in California is entirely fine for us so far after now ~7k mi in ~6 months.

For now, Polestar is the best option for us, still after several launches of competitors, even with some rattles and software bugs. Its space is just enough for us and if we wanted more space we’d want a giant SUV or minivan that could safely handle 6-7 passengers and their cargo. And the varied bugs I’ve seen have been minor and not limiting.

But in a couple years we’ll have the A6 and then A4 etron, EQE and EQS, Lucid air, Tesla 3 and S, Ioniq 6 - and the Polestar 2 and maybe Polestar 4/precept. In the 6-7 passenger market we’ll have the Rivian R1S, Volvo XC90, Model x, and maybe Polestar 3. By then they won’t be able to compete with questionable design choices (cup holders…), some questionable materials choices (some of my plastics are wearing already, but only if you look closer), and the still pretty awful ops, software, and support infrastructure. I’ve been lucky myself not having major issues. But I’d definitely want to see their support/service issues be more quickly resolved before getting another Polestar when all that competition is there.

And I have already hesitated in recommending the car to folks who might not have as much capacity or patience in dealing with technical bugs.

Polestar really has a great opportunity here. They’ve made a great car. And they have the most explicit commitment to environmental consciousness of any OEM save their parent Volvo. I just hope their software and operations teams don’t screw its up for the rest of the organization.
 

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For me no. Love the styling but the software has been a complete shambles as has the customer service.
 

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For me no. Love the styling but the software has been a complete shambles as has the customer service.
Unfortunately this is so true. First thing I had to do this morning was hold down the home button to reboot Android Automotive because Spotify suddenly decided to start playing without being asked to, and then it would not respond to any of the controls (play/pause button not responsive, screen dead, etc) so the only way to stop it was a reboot.

This is the latest in a series of silly bugs that undermine a fundamentally good product (such as - “oh look LTE has died again, let’s reboot the TCAM for the third time this week”).

It’s not good enough - I really expected more of the Google platform. Volvo’s Sensus platform has a lot of issues and I was really expecting this to be better.
 

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I'd never say no to anything. God, I find myself configuring supped-up Ford Broncos online for kicks. Fords!!

Speaking of Ford, will Polestar be more like Ford or Edsel? Only time will tell.

My wife and I have both owned different 1st year models of various cars (albeit from established brands) and initial quality is a crapshoot regardless of manufacturer. We've had perfect cars and ones that require a boatload of service.

I'm hoping that post-May OTA, some of the wrinkles others mention here will get ironed out. As someone who is just getting my Polestar it seems like I'm avoiding a bunch of the hassles that the earliest adopters faced.

However, I'm still leasing because I want a hard-out (and I like variety).
 

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I’m curious to learn what the current brand loyalty is to Polestar … so put together a poll to find out!

Before voting try to suspend any cynicism and assume they stick to their roadmap, OTA stability and app features continue to improve etc (as there’s no reason why they should not).
I think it is simply not enough time for me to determine that. Ask again in a few years.
 

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For me the purchase of the Polestar 2 was a cautious one. I was thinking of waiting for the i4, but that would have meant keeping the 540 for at least another year/18 months and I would have had the capital in the car locked in for that amount of time (the PCP balloon payment) and that wasn't an option for me.

I didn't want to pay the £47k up front for the P*, so the only option for me was the lease. This gives me 3 years, with a possible option to extend if there is nothing out there which appeals to me.

I think over the next 2 1/2 years there will be a massive shift in the range of EVs that are out there and the infrastructure should have improved to the point of having 6-12 ultra fast chargers at most motorway services and a lot more choice for 50KW chargers and so many more destination chargers that the current range anxiety will be much less.

For me I've been pretty happy with my choice. I would have liked to have the 240-250 mile range that was talked about at launch (292 WLTP is a dream really), but I can live with a 20 minute charge from one of those ultra chargers to get me to my destination for those longer trips.

If the precept lives up to the billing (so ground up EV, with a real range of 250 miles and properly designed so the weight and aerodynamics are right), it could be my goldilocks car. If not then an i4 or EQE or any of the options in the £50-70k will be parking on the driveway towards the end of 2023 :)
 

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For me this is really a two part question since P* is my first BEV. Regarding BEV vs ICE, yes, I will definitely use a BEV for almost all driving up to 150 miles but I will have an ICE just for long trips. With home charging, no oil changes, quiet ride, great acceleration, and no emissions, BEVs are great.

The second part of the question relates to the P* compared to other BEVs. Again, yes I would get another although there are many more coming out in the next few years. Having solved the "cup holder dilemma" with an afternoon wood shop project creating a storage console with two cup holders, I really like a) the looks, 2) the size, 3) the acceleration, 4) the hatchback, 5) the Android operating system 6) the two displays, especially the map ahead of the steering wheel, the seats, 7), the handling.

So far, no rattles, and no software issues at all.
 

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This car was a huge gamble, and so far it has paid off. Is it perfect? Far from it. There are lots of things I knew I'd have to deal with in a beta car. Having said that, I am pleased with the PS concept, particularly extending that of Volvo. I would absolutely buy another one unless PS continues to fall on it's face over the next several years. And of course as others come out with more competitive products the landscape changes. So PS has it's work cut out for it, but I have reasonable confidence they will remain competitive in the EV market. Only time will tell.
 

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I’ve had a pretty trouble free experience apart from some software niggles early on (and of course the recalls). It’s been reliable and is nice and relaxing to drive (esp on long trips) - the range is acceptable to me at ~220 miles.

If the tax breaks continue I’ll stick with a BEV I think as my main car but I’ll see what is available from other manufacturers when it’s time to change. It doesn’t feel as special as I’d hoped - maybe I should have got the PP!
 

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I’m an habitual “new model” buyer and the PS is one of the worst so far in terms of reliability. I waited 2 years for the original Elise and had one of the first off the production line. I also had an early Alfa 156......

the software is more complex these days but releasing Beta software on a 50k car is not good enough and in my view it’s not really even beta, there are bugs that took me 10 minutes to spot which should have not made their way to public use.

next Thursday I’m back at the dealer for the rear suspension to be “greased” to correct an awful noise from the rear suspension and this is not software. And really .....greased? it feels like I’m driving a mid sixties MG again.
 

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I'm not sure. In the U.S. they HAVE to get their servicing worked out. This whole limited "Spaces" concept is just folly.

As for the car itself, we've had little issues so far but it is frustrating that 1) it was initially advertised with much higher range 2) doesn't have all of the features that it should of had during launch. Irrespective of what they say, they haven't really done anything new; my 2014 Vette had more features and they all worked when I got it and it also was a brand new generation vehicle.

So, I would only consider another Polestar product if it had been released and in use for over a year so I could really see what I was getting and not just what someone promised that you would get...someday...
 
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