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I currently have two J1772 chargers in my garage. One is a Bosch with 30 amps of power positioned at the back of the garage. The other is a Juice box with 32 amps and near the front with a huge 24 foot cable to reach out to various parts of my driveway.

We have noticed almost no impact to our hydro bill with our Kia Soul EV. I commute 1000km a week so this home charging infrastructure is essential. I will enjoy the fast DC charging as we have a government funded one near my office. Good thing as we have no government incentives/ rebates at time of purchase for this price range.
 

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You are right that charging at home is not very expensive unless you drive lots of miles or your electricity rates are very high. I would suggest not using the DC fast charger very often as it can degrade battery life faster than home charging with a slow AC charger.
 

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You are right that charging at home is not very expensive unless you drive lots of miles or your electricity rates are very high. I would suggest not using the DC fast charger very often as it can degrade battery life faster than home charging with a slow AC charger.
Great suggestion, I'll consider that as I plan to keep this car for 300,000 km
 

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I came across this list because one of my deal sites showed a sale on the Siemens at Amazon yesterday ($387).
Any opinions on the Siemens US2 Versicharge?
It takes a NEMA 6-50, so I could use the car cable if it went wonky and needed to be replaced.
 

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I came across this list because one of my deal sites showed a sale on the Siemens at Amazon yesterday ($387).
Any opinions on the Siemens US2 Versicharge?
It takes a NEMA 6-50, so I could use the car cable if it went wonky and needed to be replaced.
Don't know about the Siemens, but I do see that your reference didn't review the more recent Chargepoint... the Chargepoint Flex. I installed the Flex and it was one that was recommended by Mike of Polestar Customer service. The Flex can be ordered with either the NEMA 14-50 or the NEMA 6-50 plug. The cable I saw briefly in the frunk in a video review was a NEMA 14-50 plug. The 14-50 receptacle has two hots, a neutral, and a ground. The Flex doesn't use the neutral. The 6-50 receptacle skips the neutral. In general, more appliances in the U.S. use the 14-50 plug, so I give it a slight advantage for versatility.
 

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The electrician wired the receptacle yesterday. Loaded the ChargePoint app and set up went remarkably smoothly. (Note sound of me knocking on wood in the background.)

Now all I need is the car to try it out, eh?

(The charger's located inside my barn, just to the left of the garage doors.)

751
 

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Like the Shell logo - makes it look like a proper fuel pump!
I'm old enough that that particular logo doesn't really look retro to me. 'Not sure why, but my dad, who was into cars, was loyal to Shell and would drive pretty far out of his way to fill up at one of their stations.
 

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I'm old enough that that particular logo doesn't really look retro to me. 'Not sure why, but my dad, who was into cars, was loyal to Shell and would drive pretty far out of his way to fill up at one of their stations.
In UK, Shell Super is the one branded super grade petrol which is 99 DIN rather than 97 or 98, so a bit like your dad I find myself routing via their stations!
 

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Shell V-Power is great stuff and was worth seeking out, back in my pre-EV days. Haven't been to a petrol station in years now and I can't exactly say I miss it ;)

I must admit that I'm intrigued that the charging point simply plugs into a socket further down. In the UK, a charge point needs to have its own dedicated feed back to the distrbution box, with inline circuit breakers, separate earth and all sorts of things!
 
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Shell V-Power is great stuff and was worth seeking out, back in my pre-EV days. Haven't been to a petrol station in years now and I can't exactly say I miss it ;)

I must admit that I'm intrigued that the charging point simply plugs into a socket further down. In the UK, a charge point needs to have its own dedicated feed back to the distrbution box, with inline circuit breakers, separate earth and all sorts of things!
I'm sharing my wife's car these days as I gave up mine in anticipation of the Polestar. 'Had to fill it up on the way to work which slowed me down and I was already thinking how much I was looking forward to not having to bother anymore with the hassle.

Here in the U.S., you can install a charging station either way: you can direct wire it or use a receptacle. I'm not absolutely sure you need a dedicated circuit, but that's the only thing that makes sense to me. I opted to use the receptacle. There are two downsides:

1. there's a maximum amperage of 50 amps using two hot or powered 120 volt lines, directly out of phase, for 240 volts. A continuous load (defined by a draw lasting 3 hours or more) is limited to 80% of the circuit rating leaving 40 amps for charging.

2. a receptacle has to be on a ground-fault circuit interupter breaker which can sometimes not play nicely with charging stations.

The benefit, though, is that it's easier to swap out a charger or send one back for repair and to do so, you don't need an electrician.

If you direct-wire the charging station, you can hook it up to a larger circuit and get a faster charging amperage. You also don't need the GFCI. But I'll be fine with the 40 amps and like the versatility, so I went with the receptacle installation.

My receptacle has four pins: hot1, hot2, neutral, and ground. The charger only needs hot1 and hot2 for normal use and the ground for safety. I could have used a 3-pin receptacle instead. Early glimpses of the charging cable, though, indicate that the U.S. cable will have the four-pin, NEMA 14-50 plug.

It's also a long run back to the circuit breaker panel (the service entrance)... 200'... so I asked for and had installed #4AWG THHN, copper wires. Those are pretty heavy compared to what's normally used, but I wanted to minimize voltage drop.

The circuit breaker is located back where the wires enter the house just after the meter as is standard in the U.S.

752
 

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Shell V-Power is great stuff and was worth seeking out, back in my pre-EV days. Haven't been to a petrol station in years now and I can't exactly say I miss it ;)

I must admit that I'm intrigued that the charging point simply plugs into a socket further down. In the UK, a charge point needs to have its own dedicated feed back to the distrbution box, with inline circuit breakers, separate earth and all sorts of things!
That’s interesting given the prevalence of untethered EVSEs there. I mean, a plug is a plug whether it’s put on one side of a control module vs another.
 

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That’s interesting given the prevalence of untethered EVSEs there. I mean, a plug is a plug whether it’s put on one side of a control module vs another.
Plugs can wear out with overuse. If it's hard wired there is nothing to wear.

So long as you don't keep plugging and unplugging it, the benefit is you get to take it with you when you move.
 

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Plugs can wear out with overuse. If it's hard wired there is nothing to wear.

So long as you don't keep plugging and unplugging it, the benefit is you get to take it with you when you move.
I've heard a plug like this is rated at a few hundred plug-ins. I'll be dead before it gets 50. Also could just swap it out with a new one for $50 and a half hour's work. Also raises the value of the property. Don't ya think?
 

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Thanks @ProfessorCook , always interesting to see how different countries wire things up! (It's the engineer in me, I can't help it... I'll keep taking the tablets ;) )
 
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I've heard a plug like this is rated at a few hundred plug-ins. I'll be dead before it gets 50. Also could just swap it out with a new one for $50 and a half hour's work. Also raises the value of the property. Don't ya think?
The charger nor the outlet is not designed to be regularly plugged and unplugged. Even 50 would be way to many. Think about your dryer or oven. The plug might only get unplugged a couple times in it's lifetime. You are talking about a very large amount of current for hours at a time. You want the connection to be very tight. It's also a best practice to kill the breaker before unplugging a 50A circuit.
 

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I found someone posting on a Tesla forum that the design cycles for this sort of plug is 350. Doesn't mean it's true, of course. Killing the breaker makes sense. I don' t plan on unplugging the charger. That's why I said I'd be dead (of old age) before I hit 50 cycles.
 
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