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Good video. At least this guy talks slower :)
The range they achieved is really disappointing, but of course they were at speeds well above what we drive in the US. The other weird thing he mentioned is how the ACC goes in increments of 5 and you have to hold it to get an increment of 1. I'm going to have to unlearn 12 years of ACC driving :rolleyes:
 

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Sounds like the ride quality is 'meh'. That's also the issue with the M3 as mentioned in these reviews. That's going to be an issue for some.
It’s really frustrating how such an established brand- talking about Volvo- cannot engineer a proper chassis with an agreeable ride/handling balance! Tesla is a startup company with no more than 4 models of experience, yet they are able to develop a better balanced chassis despite being almost 300 kilos lighter! No wonder their share price is skyrocketing...
 

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It’s really frustrating how such an established brand- talking about Volvo- cannot engineer a proper chassis with an agreeable ride/handling balance! Tesla is a startup company with no more than 4 models of experience, yet they are able to develop a better balanced chassis despite being almost 300 kilos lighter! No wonder their share price is skyrocketing...
I wouldn't refer to it as frustrating. Volvo has never really built sports cars so much as family sedans, so that's never been their goal. Volvos have never handled like BMWs for instance and that's by design. If you are looking for a car that feels comfortable at the track, you are looking in the wrong place. Having said that, Volvos are also not Toyotas, and for the average driver they handle pretty well.

As for Tesla, most of their handling characteristics are not because they know how to build a chassis (they fall down in that regard and many others), it's because they use software. And if I was looking for a car with excellent handling characteristics, I wouldn't want to rely on software.
 

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Good video. At least this guy talks slower :)
The range they achieved is really disappointing, but of course they were at speeds well above what we drive in the US. The other weird thing he mentioned is how the ACC goes in increments of 5 and you have to hold it to get an increment of 1. I'm going to have to unlearn 12 years of ACC driving :rolleyes:
I'm pretty hopeful that a lot of the range limitations are due to the performance package tires and would be redeemed with use of the base 19" ones - which are the same as that included as the 19" wheels of the Model S, so are presumably validated as maximizing range/efficiency for EVs.

Unless I'm mistaken, the reviews reporting really low highway range (160-180 highway miles/charge) were all using the Performance Package.
Polestar's own calculator suggests that just switching from 20" -> 19" extends range (but that's just by a few miles).
Also, if I understand correctly, performance is fairly opposite to range/efficiency since for better handling and carving up curves you want stickiness and grip, which is the opposite of the low rolling resistance you need for efficiency.
cf Volkswagen ID.3 electric car gets range-extending rubber

Anyone know of a P2 review with the stock 19" wheels that reports Wh/mi or kWh/100 km?
 

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I'm pretty hopeful that a lot of the range limitations are due to the performance package tires and would be redeemed with use of the base 19" ones - which are the same as that included as the 19" wheels of the Model S, so are presumably validated as maximizing range/efficiency for EVs.

Unless I'm mistaken, the reviews reporting really low highway range (160-180 highway miles/charge) were all using the Performance Package.
Polestar's own calculator suggests that just switching from 20" -> 19" extends range (but that's just by a few miles).
Also, if I understand correctly, performance is fairly opposite to range/efficiency since for better handling and carving up curves you want stickiness and grip, which is the opposite of the low rolling resistance you need for efficiency.
cf Volkswagen ID.3 electric car gets range-extending rubber

Anyone know of a P2 review with the stock 19" wheels that reports Wh/mi or kWh/100 km?
And this is correct. You do get some additional range going to smaller tires, but not enough to make a significant difference. So nobody should be going into the purchase of any BEV thinking that miracles will happen with smaller tires.

However smaller tires also tend to provide a better, softer ride. For those looking for sportier handling, they'll want the larger tires and with it comes more noise, a harder ride and somewhat less range. It's always a compromise.
 

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Polestar claims the 20in wheels weigh less than the 19s thus reducing unsprung weight which is 10x more important than sprung weight. They also claim (not sure how) that the Brembos have a greater regeneration impact.
 

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Well he made an interesting comparison. Here again the reviewer called the ride as 'very firm', ‘race car harshly tuned’, yet referred to the M3 as 'soft' (or he used a similar term) and set up for the American market. Yet most reviewers and even owners refer to the M3's ride as quite firm and it's even gotten negative reviews for being too hard a ride. So if the P2 is so much firmer than the already firm M3, then this thing must ride very firm. Yes, it's another 'performance' version, but it would still get me a bit nervous.

I also noticed that it appeared the hood didn’t close properly and they edited it so the next scene had the hood closed all the way. (23:17). Also looked like the charge door wasn’t properly aligned. I know, I’m being harsh, but coming from a Tesla I see these kinds of things.

But hey, he does call the I-Pace a ‘fantastic car’. On that I agree. ;)
 

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Well he made an interesting comparison. Here again the reviewer called the ride as 'very firm', yet referred to the M3 as 'soft' (or he used a similar term) and set up for the American market. Yet most reviewers and even owners refer to the M3's ride as quite firm and it's even gotten negative reviews for being too hard a ride. So if the P2 is firmer than the already firm M3, then this thing must ride very firm. Yes, it's another 'performance' version, but it would still get me a bit nervous.

But hey, he does call the I-Pace a ‘fantastic car’. On that I agree. ;)
Volvo didn't create their "Performance" brand cars to ride like a Lexus, and anyone looking for that should definitely look elsewhere. When the sister version of this car (XC40 EV) comes out I'm certain it will ride softer for a different demographic. Reviewers saying this car rides too firm are akin to reviewers saying a BMW M3 rides too firm. It's a fair but otherwise worthless comment.
 

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It’s not a worthless comment when he provides a reference point. He’s already saying the M3 is ‘soft’ when it’s been pretty universally criticized as being too firm. So that gives us a reference point for Johnny’s thinking and preferences when he says the P2 is much firmer than the M3. He apparently likes an extremely firm ride.

It would be very prudent for those considering the P2 to get it on a road that’s not silky smooth. IOW a potholed road, which are ubiquitous these days. This will tell the prospective owner if the ride is really too harsh or just fine for their tastes. Do not only take your test drive on only nice paved roads. During the review he hit some bump that made him verbalize the impact.

I‘d also closely check out the build quality based on a couple of things I saw there. Made me think of Tesla’s QC. Been there done that. ;)
 

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It’s not a worthless comment when he provides a reference point. He’s already saying the M3 is ‘soft’ when it’s been pretty universally criticized as being too firm. So that gives us a reference point for Johnny’s thinking and preferences when he says the P2 is much firmer than the M3. He apparently likes an extremely firm ride.

It would be very prudent for those considering the P2 to get it on a road that’s not silky smooth. IOW a potholed road, which are ubiquitous these days. This will tell the prospective owner if the ride is really too harsh or just fine for their tastes. Do not only take your test drive on only nice paved roads. During the review he hit some bump that made him verbalize the impact.

I‘d also closely check out the build quality based on a couple of things I saw there. Made me think of Tesla’s QC. Been there done that. ;)
Soft vs. Firm is an incredibly subjective measure. What I think is soft someone who drives a Lexus may think is firm. Having said that, the Polestar is a Performance division just like BMW M, Mercedes AMG, or Audi R, and it's meant to be firm. By real comparison, if it were any firmer than any of those other Germans it would be un-drivable, so any true concern is misplaced. But if you are looking for a cushy ride you're in the wrong place.

What's prudent when it comes to ride for someone who chose a Jag over a P2 may not be necessary at all for someone looking for a Performance version of a Volvo. Jag is known for very nice riding cars that are closer to Lexus territory than M, AMG, or R. The Tesla ride is also not comparable. The Tesla M3 has a much smaller wheelbase, and as such has a harsher ride regardless of tuning.
 

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The Tesla ride is also not comparable. The Tesla M3 has a much smaller wheelbase, and as such has a harsher ride regardless of tuning.
Model 3 wheelbase = 113", rear track = 62"
Polestar 2 wheelbase = 108", rear track = 63"

If shorter wheelbase means harsher ride... well... dang

I'm really hoping test drives can start up in the next few weeks. That's the only way to answer this.
Assuming the P2 test drive is like they say (~1 hr to drive around and come back) then I have the perfect route laid out with hills, curves, and potholes galore plus some highway and city streets. If I can take my wife and make it out and back without my wife getting sick then we're good!
 

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Model 3 wheelbase = 113", rear track = 62"
Polestar 2 wheelbase = 108", rear track = 63"

If shorter wheelbase means harsher ride... well... dang

I'm really hoping test drives can start up in the next few weeks. That's the only way to answer this.
Assuming the P2 test drive is like they say (~1 hr to drive around and come back) then I have the perfect route laid out with hills, curves, and potholes galore plus some highway and city streets. If I can take my wife and make it out and back without my wife getting sick then we're good!
Those numbers are surprising. Because the front wheels of the M3 are pushed way back. Wheelbase has a lot to do with ride (even for bicycles!) but there are certainly other factors. For argument's sake then the P2 may be sprung even softer to achieve a similar ride to the M3. I don't give the Tesla much credence when it comes to chassis tuning. Most of what they do they accomplish with software, whereas established brands actually test and tune chassis components.
 

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Soft vs. Firm is an incredibly subjective measure. What I think is soft someone who drives a Lexus may think is firm. Having said that, the Polestar is a Performance division just like BMW M, Mercedes AMG, or Audi R, and it's meant to be firm. By real comparison, if it were any firmer than any of those other Germans it would be un-drivable, so any true concern is misplaced. But if you are looking for a cushy ride you're in the wrong place.

What's prudent when it comes to ride for someone who chose a Jag over a P2 may not be necessary at all for someone looking for a Performance version of a Volvo. Jag is known for very nice riding cars that are closer to Lexus territory than M, AMG, or R. The Tesla ride is also not comparable. The Tesla M3 has a much smaller wheelbase, and as such has a harsher ride regardless of tuning.
I was simply reiterating what several reviewers said about the M3 vs the P2 ride quality. Almost nobody has driven a P2, but many have driven a Tesla. So any comparisons to a known quantity are quite useful in making a decision. If car A rides harder than car B, but you've driven car B and not car A, then it gives you some idea as to ride quality.

Further, the last review that was posted was for a P2 that was not the performance iteration. That was still referred to as a firm ride with the reviewer's preference to the M3. That might be great for people looking for a very firm ride, but one needs to know that going into this.

And to be totally objective, my I-Pace's ride is definitely firmer than my wife's ES300h.
 

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Model 3 wheelbase = 113", rear track = 62"
Polestar 2 wheelbase = 108", rear track = 63"

If shorter wheelbase means harsher ride... well... dang

I'm really hoping test drives can start up in the next few weeks. That's the only way to answer this.
Assuming the P2 test drive is like they say (~1 hr to drive around and come back) then I have the perfect route laid out with hills, curves, and potholes galore plus some highway and city streets. If I can take my wife and make it out and back without my wife getting sick then we're good!
And that's the intelligent way to approach this! Best of luck and let us know how you find it.
 

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A pretty over the top positive review (for a guy who seems pretty reserved/precise otherwise) - compares it as a competitor not just for TM3 but also BMW 3 series, Audi A4, and Merc C-class.... not bad company!

Notably mentions 17 kWh/100 km consumption cruising at 100 kph which would translate to a ~260 mi range at 60-65 mph, while driving with the Performance Package. Good enough for me!
Says the base fabric seats are comfortable enough for him. Mentions a couple times that noise insulation is great. And says nothing about the ride being too firm.

[Edited to fix mi/km screw up - thanks @JRRF ! End range calc is accurate]
 

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He definitely had the most positive review far & away. That key fob design & size is beyond belief. That can't possibly be a Volvo design. Can you imagine carrying that thing in your pocket?
 

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To elaborate further on Johnny's semantics, he calls the P2 ride "subtle" while he refers to the chassis as "firm". They are different. He refers to the TM3 as having a softer chassis. So while the P2 has a plenty comfortable ride, the handling (chassis tuning) is nothing like the TM3. And that makes perfectly good sense since the Tesla was made for the American market, while the Polestar is European. As a more pronounced example, while a Lexus LS460 rides like a ball of mush, it also handles like a ball of mush. Whereas a Mercedes S class has an equally superior ride to the Lexus, you can also flog it around a track and it behaves.
 

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I will confess I have no idea what a ‘subtle’ ride means. In many years of reading and watching car reviews, I’ve never seen ‘subtle’ used as an adjective to describe a ride. 🧐

In terms of determining range, I’d discount this test as I don’t trust how he performed it or how accurate the range guesstimate of the car is. I’d wait for more controlled tests like Bjørn does.
 
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