Polestar Forum banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How long would you leave a fully charged P2 parked without plugging in the charger? Could it last two weeks? Would the 12 volt battery functions fail? Is it safe to leave the car plugged in for several weeks continuously?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
863 Posts
I would have thought that leaving it for 2 weeks at 80% would be fine for the main battery without being plugged in, but as for the 12v, that's in the lap of the gods by all accounts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,217 Posts
Any car should be fine for a month with a health 12V. Obviously the scare with the polestar is the 12V issues ... but if you have had your car for several months them I'm sure any 12V issues would have been raised by now.

As for the main battery ... the worst phantom lose was around 1% per week. So any state of battery between 40-80% would be fine.

Just remember you'll have flat tyres when you get back, so drive gently until the tyres go back into shape ... no 0-100mph acceleration tests after picking the car up ;-)
 

·
Registered
Polestar 2 (Thunder/Slate)
Joined
·
867 Posts
I would have thought that leaving it for 2 weeks at 80% would be fine for the main battery without being plugged in, but as for the 12v, that's in the lap of the gods by all accounts.
I've left cars parked for over two months without issues, two weeks shouldn't be a problem especially if the battery is not over 3-4 years old.

I doubt this will be any different for the Polestar 2, especially since - in theory - it should periodically use the propulsion battery to top up the 12V one with the latest firmware.

Most of the recent 12V battery horror stories I've read about in the forum are due to things failing, eg the AVAS speakers failing in a way that deplete the 12V battery.

In any case it's prudent, since road assistance might take hours to reach you, to always keep a jump starter in your car and carry a full physical key with you (so in the case of the Polestar 2, not the activity key!)

This way even if the worst happens, you can still access your car and get moving.
 

·
Registered
Polestar 2 (Thunder/Slate)
Joined
·
867 Posts
Any car should be fine for a month with a health 12V. Obviously the scare with the polestar is the 12V issues ... but if you have had your car for several months them I'm sure any 12V issues would have been raised by now.

As for the main battery ... the worst phantom lose was around 1% per week. So any state of battery between 40-80% would be fine.

Just remember you'll have flat tyres when you get back, so drive gently until the tyres go back into shape ... no 0-100mph acceleration tests after picking the car up ;-)
Good point about the tyres, never thought about this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
176 Posts
Any car should be fine for a month with a health 12V. Obviously the scare with the polestar is the 12V issues ... but if you have had your car for several months them I'm sure any 12V issues would have been raised by now.
Well my 12V battery problem happened months after I took delivery in early September.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I thought I had read of problems with others when leaving the car unattended. The dealer, who I am not convinced knows very much, said one month would be the threshold. I assumed this car drains a lot of the 12 volt battery reserve because it is always on driving electronics when idle. I am not at all concerned about the high power lithium batteries reserve. Those should be fine for a very long time. I was just not sure if the 12 volt battery is automatically charged from the high power lithium batteries. A neighbor with a Tesla 3 says he never worries about it. But that its comparing apples to oranges ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Polestar's manual for long term storage over a month or more is to maintain the battery at 40%. But the procedure requires you to be present and monitoring the car for the duration. Nowhere can I find the suggestions for an unattended vehicle, say three weeks in an airport parking lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,217 Posts
An ICE car can be left for months and still run if the 12V is healthy.

An EV's 12V is doing to the same job and as any ICE 12V. Alarm, Central Locking, Keyless Entry, etc...
 

·
Super Moderator
Polestar 2, Midnight (blue), charcoal interior, non-PP
Joined
·
2,867 Posts
The car definitively DOES top up the 12V in the background - mine was doing it again last night, as the car hasn't run for about a week and it has a dual dashcam (in parking mode) amongst other things running continuously. If the 12V goes flat, it's because one of the ECUs isn't shutting down properly, which stops the car going into its low power mode, thus disabling the 12V topping up system (it appears). Any 12V battery of any size or type will go flat under these circumstances.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
This is what I heard back from Polestar support today:
I just asked one of our internal engineers and it was stated that the vehicle is not recommended to sit for longer than approximately 30 days unplugged from a wall-box/AC charger. After 30 days, the 12V battery may begin to see some voltage loss, leaving the vehicle unable to start. The high voltage battery for the vehicle should not see any loss from extended periods of storage however. If you have the option to keep it connected to an AC charger while in storage, then your vehicle can remain stored for longer periods of time.

I was just wondering if there is anything I could manually turn off to increase that longevity. I don't imagine leaving it for more than 2 weeks ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
An ICE car can be left for months and still run if the 12V is healthy.

An EV's 12V is doing to the same job and as any ICE 12V. Alarm, Central Locking, Keyless Entry, etc...
Except that the battery in the ICE car the batter will go dead inside of 1 month. Happens with two of my ICE. I have heard related stories, all blame people blame it on the alarm systems.

With the POLESTAR it will be charged from the Lithium battery and should be able to run after a much longer period of time..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
This is what I heard back from Polestar support today:
I just asked one of our internal engineers and it was stated that the vehicle is not recommended to sit for longer than approximately 30 days unplugged from a wall-box/AC charger. After 30 days, the 12V battery may begin to see some voltage loss, leaving the vehicle unable to start. The high voltage battery for the vehicle should not see any loss from extended periods of storage however. If you have the option to keep it connected to an AC charger while in storage, then your vehicle can remain stored for longer periods of time.

I was just wondering if there is anything I could manually turn off to increase that longevity. I don't imagine leaving it for more than 2 weeks ever.
I have left my car in the garage, not plugged in for a two week period unused. No issues at all. The main battery losing maybe 1%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
For anything longer than a week or two, you really should use a battery tender on the 12v. It's the same with ICE vehicles, except you sometimes have to drain the gas tank and run the engine till the fuel system is dry if it's going to be a really long time.

Storing on jack stands is another plus so you don't flat spot the tires. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
For anything longer than a week or two, you really should use a battery tender on the 12v. It's the same with ICE vehicles, except you sometimes have to drain the gas tank and run the engine till the fuel system is dry if it's going to be a really long time.

Storing on jack stands is another plus so you don't flat spot the tires. :)
Every few weeks, I push the vehicle a foot or two backwaed or forwards. If its a nice day I might take it for a drive, (so long as it's taxed and insured)
 

·
Super Moderator
Polestar 2, Midnight (blue), charcoal interior, non-PP
Joined
·
2,867 Posts
Honestly, EVs shouldn't need any kind of battery tender and should be fine to leave indefinitely - the top-up charging from the high voltage pack is doing exactly what a trickle charger would do, only with much more precision and control. Just more misinformation from people guessing, sadly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
Honestly, EVs shouldn't need any kind of battery tender and should be fine to leave indefinitely - the top-up charging from the high voltage pack is doing exactly what a trickle charger would do, only with much more precision and control. Just more misinformation from people guessing, sadly.
Theoretically you can leave an EV for months, maybe well over a year, before you deplete the HV battery enough to where it can't keep the 12V topped up. But 12V charging issues are a thing with EVs, so if you're leaving the car unattended for weeks at a time a tender is additional peace of mind.
 
  • Like
Reactions: rgledhill

·
Super Moderator
Polestar 2, Midnight (blue), charcoal interior, non-PP
Joined
·
2,867 Posts
Hmm, I'm not so sure. As I understand it (and have experienced it multiple times on the Kona), either the car shuts down properly or it doesn't. If it shuts down, it should be fine indefinitely, topping up the 12V when necessary. If it doesn't, then it'll be flat the next morning. Also, a tender may not be enough to deliver the 2 or more Amps that the non-shutdown car takes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,529 Posts
Hmm, I'm not so sure. As I understand it (and have experienced it multiple times on the Kona), either the car shuts down properly or it doesn't. If it shuts down, it should be fine indefinitely, topping up the 12V when necessary. If it doesn't, then it'll be flat the next morning. Also, a tender may not be enough to deliver the 2 or more Amps that the non-shutdown car takes.
Fair point. I wasn't sure if it's something that could materialize while the car is unattended.

Also, today I learned that "Battery Tender" is a specific product. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
there is a lenghty article in one of the norwegian newspapers today about EV's and the cold / cars getting driven less than usual in these pandemic times :
google translate:

---------------------------------------
The cold provides record-breaking days for car salvors. Even fully charged electric cars are knocked out by a flat starter battery.

Several cars need starting assistance in the cold
Many people struggle with their car in the cold. Bilberger Eivind Vaaland has had about 15 assignments every day lately. Ten of the assignments concern electric cars.



- It started a few days after New Year's Eve. Since then, things have gone from strength to strength, says Eivind Vaaland in Viking Rescue Service.

- At first there were a number of people who struggled on slippery surfaces, but now it is mostly just starting aid, says the experienced car salvage worker.

The freezing cold has affected large parts of the country recently. It has led to record high power consumption and ski runs in highly unusual places.

The low temperatures also cause car salvors around the country to experience unusually busy days:

Both the Norwegian Automobile Association (NAF) and the Viking Rescue Service report twice as many assignments as normal this New Year.

Marketing director Sjur Jensen Bay in Viking tells about 30,000 assignments in January this year, compared to 15,000 in the same period last year. The trend continues in February.

- There are many who have problems getting started on their car now that it is so cold. Although the electric cars are usually fully charged, they have an empty starter battery. Then, like fossil cars, they do not get started and need help, says Jensen Bay.

Sjur Jensen Bay
Marketing Director Sjur Jensen Bay in Viking.


Recommends external charger
At Viking Redningstjeneste Stavanger, every fourth assignment is about starting difficulties and empty batteries. Often on brand new electric cars.

- There is a lot of electronics and many things that steal electricity. Therefore, they get a lot of problems with new cars, says general manager Lars Morten Nesheim.

He has some advice for electric car owners:

- We recommend having an external charger and charging four times a year. Then the battery will last much longer.

Lars Morten Nesheim
General manager Lars Morten Nesheim in Viking Redningstjeneste Stavanger also says that new electric cars have problems in the cold. - There is a lot of electronics and many things that steal electricity, he says.


The reason why the starter battery is drained of electricity is a lot of light driving and the use of a heater. Then it is often useless to put the car on charge in a cold garage.

The solution for many is that the car rescuers give the battery some power, and send the car owner out on the road to charge the battery by driving a trip.

Surprised by new car
Electric car owner Roar Larsen in Stavanger started the day with an electric car that refused to wake up to life. Then there was nothing to do but call car salvors.

- It's a new car, so I'm a little surprised that this is happening. I reckon it is a guarantee case, he says.


Larsen thinks it is bad that he has to use the car unnecessarily for it to be charged. But car salesperson Vaaland believes it is important to use the car if you want it to work.

- Those who drive little need help. And those who drive a lot do not need help, he says.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top