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Discussion Starter #1

(I apologise up front, this is very long, but its cheaper than therapy!)

We are experienced EV owners, having owned an early Nissan Leaf, A Hyundai Ioniq electric, a Vauxhall Ampera (which we still have), Hybrids, a Tesla Model 3 Performance….. and now a Polestar 2. We are early adopters, and know and understand the pitfalls and problems that come with that ideology. We believe in the concept of EV’s and the benefits they bring to the driving experience and also the potential ‘green’ advantages.

Our experiences of the Tesla M3 sales, marketing and support had already put us on our guard, and the reported poor build quality of the 3 and total lack of local service and support were a concern. We could see Polestar following the Tesla sales and marketing model to the letter, and now on through the delivery and ownership experience, to the point that they repeated the same very obvious errors. Clearly they failed to learn from the mistakes of Tesla, with misinformation around delivery dates, unexplained delays in delivery, and missing functionality. This has not improved in the UK.

We took delivery of our P2 on 9 September. Our handover was little more than ‘here’s the key’s’, this is the boot, this is the frunk, off you go. Not a good start. Obviously we had watched the online video reviews and ‘how to’ guides, looked at the manual, and gleaned as much information as we could. We are far from EV newbies, and knew that our knowledge and history would be relevant to the P2 too. We were pleased with the build quality and looks of the car. Initial impressions were extremely positive, and the P2 has the look and feel of a well designed, well spec’ed, and well build proper (EV) car.

We drove the car, and the EV experience was there is bucketfuls. A ‘grown up’ EV. We were, and are, slightly disappointed about the economy, or should I say efficiency, and have achieved just over 3 miles per kWh. This is to be expected in a large heavy car, but will inevitably decrease in the colder weather. As we charge at home for 99% of the time, and will not be using public charging, that is not too much of an issue as we will still be paying around 4p per mile for ‘fuel’.

Around the time we took delivery rumours started to circulate that some software listed in the P2 spec was not installed, and updates that were going to be available late 2020 were being delayed until Christmas and as far out as mid 2021. For a car to be launched in multiple countries with software being so significantly delayed raises further concerns. A price paid by early adopters, some might say, and that would be reasonable if the delayed functionality were merely ‘nice to haves’. Sadly, some of the missing features are much more fundamental. For example, the car does not have, and for some time will continue not to have ‘over the air’ updates. This means that every software update will necessitate a trip to the local service centre. Examples include the lack of pre-conditioning, timed charging, the promised phone app, to name only a few. These are all established elements of EV ownership offered by other manufacturers, yet Polestar have failed to include them in their launch cars, and now owners are faced with significant delays until they do become available. The reasons for the failure to provide have not been adequately explained or justified by Polestar. Indeed, one of the biggest criticisms of Polestar has to be the total lack of honest and open communication with their customers. Whether that is a sign of contempt for their first customers, or simply bad management, remains unclear. However, with the well established and respected Volvo brand behind them, one would expect Polestar to do better. They are not a new player or start up company caught unawares by their sudden level of success. Several weeks ago Polestar asked its customers and prospects to sign up to receive a newsletter, but since then nothing of note has been forthcoming from Polestar. The silence is deafening.

It is worth noting that the P2 was launched a year ago in the UK, so the car had been in design for probably 2-3 years before that. Now, another year further on, software is still not in place 4+ years from concept, and will not for several more months. Why?

This lack of communication does more to engender doubt and dissatisfaction among both new and potential customers than any honest admission of human failing, ‘we are sorry’ would have been nice, and 'this is what we are doing to fix it' would be even better.

Now that some cars have been delivered in Europe and the UK a number of other issues are surfacing, such as lights being incorrectly configured, cars rumoured to be shutting down for safety reasons, and problems charging. Not entirely unexpected for a new car launch. Some of these issues will require visits to a local service centre, but many could be resolved more easily if the cars had OTA functionality.

We are fortunate in Europe in that we contend with relatively short distances in order to get to a well established Volvo dealership for support. That network may or may not be available in North America, but in any event the distances involved may be far greater. That would be a serious concern for me in my decision making process, as it was with our decision to buy a Tesla with very limited UK support. However, the ability and willingness of Volvo to support the Polestar brand in the UK is in its very early stages of implementation. It seems clear that larger Volvo dealerships have been ‘told’ they will provide support at a very senior level. However from my experiences of using that service, they are neither familiar with the product, nor fully trained.

Which leads me on to my specific ownership story:

As I said we took delivery on 9 September. From day one we had problems getting the software working properly; experiencing problems with inability to connect to WiFi, voice commands, charging, sat nav, phone connectivity and use, radio and media. In addition we had a few problems including lose rear windows, water seeming to collect in the tailgate, condensation in the headlights. We assumed the majority would be fixed by software updates, and some of the other ‘Volvo’ issues could be assessed and fixed by the dealership.

I accept that some of the problems we have encountered may be ‘user error’, we’re not perfect, but we do know EV’s. However the lack of any meaningful user manual (in the true meaning of the word), Getting Started guides or videos, or indeed any technical support customers can actually speak to; meant that if we are at fault for some issues, we have been unable to overcome them. I do not however believe that our problems are of our making.

We contacted Polestar with our concerns and on 22 September sent a summary of the problems, who suggested we speak to the local Volvo dealership. They in turn said they were unable to help and referred us back to Polestar. Polestar then ‘spoke’ to the dealership who then booked the car in for the earliest date they had available – the 7 October. In that same email we also gave a notice of intention to reject the car, as we were just within the 2 week period. Polestar extended that option window to 30 days, which gave us until 9 October (significant).

In the run up to 7 October we reset the car several times and spent a lot of time trying, without success, to get the car working properly. In that time we had various error messages appear in the car, including the dreaded “propulsion system service required’ message.

The dealership duly collected the car on the 7th, left us with a loan car for the day, with a view to performing 2 recalls for software updates and check/adjust the headlights which was another recall. They contacted us late on the 7th to say they needed the car overnight. On the 8th they returned the car at 7pm saying they had done “what they can”. They also said that it was lucky because a revision to one of the updates came through on the morning of the 8th which they had applied. In conversation they told me that this was the first Polestar they had seen and therefore the car attracted great interest among both sales and service staff. They also said that they had had some training pre-covid (March) but that this was a learning curve for them.

At this point I should say that the Volvo dealership clearly did their best, their communication was good, and I was happy with the outcome. They have sent a report to Polestar of what they found, which includes videos. I have asked for a copy, but sadly nothing has been provided to me, not even a job sheet.

On the morning of the 9th, I tried the car. My intention was to go through the set up from scratch, create my profile, link my key and phone, set up my accounts, and go for a drive! Up until this point we have driven the car for about 7 hours, and spent about 70 hours trying to get it working!

The car would not make an internet connection; it will not connect to my WiFi. I cannot set up a profile. It will drive, but obviously there are no maps or sat nav, and the ‘hey Google’ and voice button do not work at all. In a nutshell, it is worse now than when it was sent to the dealership.

I again described the problems and asserted my right to reject in emails to Polestar, which only resulted yet again in standard waffle straight out of the customer placation chapter of the sales support manual. The last one suggesting “the best thing for this would indeed to bring the car back to the service centre for them to re-assess why this issue has not been resolved, and have this further work completed.” [sic].

My last email to them asking “Please advise by return - what specifically do Polestar intend to do to resolve this, and when??” has received no response.

At no time have Polestar been proactive, offered any assurances, felt my pain – or even acknowledged it - in any meaningful way. Early adopters take a gamble, we all know that, but people who put their faith (and money) in a new product need a degree of comfort when things go wrong. If I, and maybe a hundred other people, all reject our cars it will not make a scrap of difference to the Polestar balance sheet, which at the end of the is all that they worry about.

So how do we feel about Polestar and the P2? Very Disappointed. I do not believe our expectations were, or are, unreasonable. I am paying nearly £50,000 for something that does not perform as it should or as Polestar told me it would. They have not supported me to get issues resolved or made me feel a valued customer. They have let me down. The P2 is a lovely car, it could be a great car, and we love driving it. But now we also hate everything else about it.
But do we want to reject it? No, we want it to work, but Polestar are pushing us to the point where we may have to walk away,

So, what now? Drop it off at the Dealership with the keys and walk away? Given them another opportunity to put it right and see what materialises? Wait for the next thing to go wrong?

Quite simply, I don’t know, the step step depends on Polestar. Maybe that’s part II….
 

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I'd search for the name and business address of someone in the upper management team and write them directly, I think. In a recent interview, Thomas Ingenlath said that they are now shifting their focus to customer service. You've experienced a breakdown in their system. Perhaps they'd react from the top down.
 
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Wow, I’m really sorry to hear this. Frankly, your tale of woe reflected some of my concerns and was one of the main reasons I canceled my preorder some time ago. That concern coupled with the silence of Polestar as to who and where cars would be serviced in my area of NA, were very disconcerting. Having concierge service up to 150 miles gave me little solace, as I did not like the idea of a stranger driving my car up to 300 miles for a software update or other issue.

I’m sure that the P2 will eventually become the car it was designed to be, but I wasn’t willing to go through the growing pains especially given Polestar’s poor communications for a brand new product. That was a concerning combination of potential issues.

I eventually went a different route and I’ve been extremely happy with my choice. My advice would be to get out while you still can. It doesn’t sound like these issue or Polestar communications will be improving any time soon. You can always buy the car down the road if things improve. Best of luck in what ever you do.
 

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With regards to the WiFi problem, try turning off WPS on your router. That has solved the issue for everyone else who has tried this.
 

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With regards to the WiFi problem, try turning off WPS on your router. That has solved the issue for everyone else who has tried this.
Turning WPS off worked for me, though the wifi signal in the garage is bad, despite the router being a line of vision through the upstairs window. That said I only connected the wifi several weeks after having the car as there was absolutely no need for me to use it. The EE mobile signal is adequate to download updates, use maps, and listen to music which has not been cached, and of course voice commands.
 

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Modern 'Low E' glass attenuates WiFi quite a lot believe it or not!
Is that in the car or the home windows? Think my double glazed windows are 30 years old when I personally installed them! More likely for me the steel roof and garage doors. The wifi from home to phone does work over a hundred meters away across the field, but not the 20 to the inside of the garage.
 

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(I apologise up front, this is very long, but its cheaper than therapy!)

We are experienced EV owners, having owned an early Nissan Leaf, A Hyundai Ioniq electric, a Vauxhall Ampera (which we still have), Hybrids, a Tesla Model 3 Performance….. and now a Polestar 2. We are early adopters, and know and understand the pitfalls and problems that come with that ideology. We believe in the concept of EV’s and the benefits they bring to the driving experience and also the potential ‘green’ advantages.

Our experiences of the Tesla M3 sales, marketing and support had already put us on our guard, and the reported poor build quality of the 3 and total lack of local service and support were a concern. We could see Polestar following the Tesla sales and marketing model to the letter, and now on through the delivery and ownership experience, to the point that they repeated the same very obvious errors. Clearly they failed to learn from the mistakes of Tesla, with misinformation around delivery dates, unexplained delays in delivery, and missing functionality. This has not improved in the UK.

We took delivery of our P2 on 9 September. Our handover was little more than ‘here’s the key’s’, this is the boot, this is the frunk, off you go. Not a good start. Obviously we had watched the online video reviews and ‘how to’ guides, looked at the manual, and gleaned as much information as we could. We are far from EV newbies, and knew that our knowledge and history would be relevant to the P2 too. We were pleased with the build quality and looks of the car. Initial impressions were extremely positive, and the P2 has the look and feel of a well designed, well spec’ed, and well build proper (EV) car.

We drove the car, and the EV experience was there is bucketfuls. A ‘grown up’ EV. We were, and are, slightly disappointed about the economy, or should I say efficiency, and have achieved just over 3 miles per kWh. This is to be expected in a large heavy car, but will inevitably decrease in the colder weather. As we charge at home for 99% of the time, and will not be using public charging, that is not too much of an issue as we will still be paying around 4p per mile for ‘fuel’.

Around the time we took delivery rumours started to circulate that some software listed in the P2 spec was not installed, and updates that were going to be available late 2020 were being delayed until Christmas and as far out as mid 2021. For a car to be launched in multiple countries with software being so significantly delayed raises further concerns. A price paid by early adopters, some might say, and that would be reasonable if the delayed functionality were merely ‘nice to haves’. Sadly, some of the missing features are much more fundamental. For example, the car does not have, and for some time will continue not to have ‘over the air’ updates. This means that every software update will necessitate a trip to the local service centre. Examples include the lack of pre-conditioning, timed charging, the promised phone app, to name only a few. These are all established elements of EV ownership offered by other manufacturers, yet Polestar have failed to include them in their launch cars, and now owners are faced with significant delays until they do become available. The reasons for the failure to provide have not been adequately explained or justified by Polestar. Indeed, one of the biggest criticisms of Polestar has to be the total lack of honest and open communication with their customers. Whether that is a sign of contempt for their first customers, or simply bad management, remains unclear. However, with the well established and respected Volvo brand behind them, one would expect Polestar to do better. They are not a new player or start up company caught unawares by their sudden level of success. Several weeks ago Polestar asked its customers and prospects to sign up to receive a newsletter, but since then nothing of note has been forthcoming from Polestar. The silence is deafening.

It is worth noting that the P2 was launched a year ago in the UK, so the car had been in design for probably 2-3 years before that. Now, another year further on, software is still not in place 4+ years from concept, and will not for several more months. Why?

This lack of communication does more to engender doubt and dissatisfaction among both new and potential customers than any honest admission of human failing, ‘we are sorry’ would have been nice, and 'this is what we are doing to fix it' would be even better.

Now that some cars have been delivered in Europe and the UK a number of other issues are surfacing, such as lights being incorrectly configured, cars rumoured to be shutting down for safety reasons, and problems charging. Not entirely unexpected for a new car launch. Some of these issues will require visits to a local service centre, but many could be resolved more easily if the cars had OTA functionality.

We are fortunate in Europe in that we contend with relatively short distances in order to get to a well established Volvo dealership for support. That network may or may not be available in North America, but in any event the distances involved may be far greater. That would be a serious concern for me in my decision making process, as it was with our decision to buy a Tesla with very limited UK support. However, the ability and willingness of Volvo to support the Polestar brand in the UK is in its very early stages of implementation. It seems clear that larger Volvo dealerships have been ‘told’ they will provide support at a very senior level. However from my experiences of using that service, they are neither familiar with the product, nor fully trained.

Which leads me on to my specific ownership story:

As I said we took delivery on 9 September. From day one we had problems getting the software working properly; experiencing problems with inability to connect to WiFi, voice commands, charging, sat nav, phone connectivity and use, radio and media. In addition we had a few problems including lose rear windows, water seeming to collect in the tailgate, condensation in the headlights. We assumed the majority would be fixed by software updates, and some of the other ‘Volvo’ issues could be assessed and fixed by the dealership.

I accept that some of the problems we have encountered may be ‘user error’, we’re not perfect, but we do know EV’s. However the lack of any meaningful user manual (in the true meaning of the word), Getting Started guides or videos, or indeed any technical support customers can actually speak to; meant that if we are at fault for some issues, we have been unable to overcome them. I do not however believe that our problems are of our making.

We contacted Polestar with our concerns and on 22 September sent a summary of the problems, who suggested we speak to the local Volvo dealership. They in turn said they were unable to help and referred us back to Polestar. Polestar then ‘spoke’ to the dealership who then booked the car in for the earliest date they had available – the 7 October. In that same email we also gave a notice of intention to reject the car, as we were just within the 2 week period. Polestar extended that option window to 30 days, which gave us until 9 October (significant).

In the run up to 7 October we reset the car several times and spent a lot of time trying, without success, to get the car working properly. In that time we had various error messages appear in the car, including the dreaded “propulsion system service required’ message.

The dealership duly collected the car on the 7th, left us with a loan car for the day, with a view to performing 2 recalls for software updates and check/adjust the headlights which was another recall. They contacted us late on the 7th to say they needed the car overnight. On the 8th they returned the car at 7pm saying they had done “what they can”. They also said that it was lucky because a revision to one of the updates came through on the morning of the 8th which they had applied. In conversation they told me that this was the first Polestar they had seen and therefore the car attracted great interest among both sales and service staff. They also said that they had had some training pre-covid (March) but that this was a learning curve for them.

At this point I should say that the Volvo dealership clearly did their best, their communication was good, and I was happy with the outcome. They have sent a report to Polestar of what they found, which includes videos. I have asked for a copy, but sadly nothing has been provided to me, not even a job sheet.

On the morning of the 9th, I tried the car. My intention was to go through the set up from scratch, create my profile, link my key and phone, set up my accounts, and go for a drive! Up until this point we have driven the car for about 7 hours, and spent about 70 hours trying to get it working!

The car would not make an internet connection; it will not connect to my WiFi. I cannot set up a profile. It will drive, but obviously there are no maps or sat nav, and the ‘hey Google’ and voice button do not work at all. In a nutshell, it is worse now than when it was sent to the dealership.

I again described the problems and asserted my right to reject in emails to Polestar, which only resulted yet again in standard waffle straight out of the customer placation chapter of the sales support manual. The last one suggesting “the best thing for this would indeed to bring the car back to the service centre for them to re-assess why this issue has not been resolved, and have this further work completed.” [sic].

My last email to them asking “Please advise by return - what specifically do Polestar intend to do to resolve this, and when??” has received no response.

At no time have Polestar been proactive, offered any assurances, felt my pain – or even acknowledged it - in any meaningful way. Early adopters take a gamble, we all know that, but people who put their faith (and money) in a new product need a degree of comfort when things go wrong. If I, and maybe a hundred other people, all reject our cars it will not make a scrap of difference to the Polestar balance sheet, which at the end of the is all that they worry about.

So how do we feel about Polestar and the P2? Very Disappointed. I do not believe our expectations were, or are, unreasonable. I am paying nearly £50,000 for something that does not perform as it should or as Polestar told me it would. They have not supported me to get issues resolved or made me feel a valued customer. They have let me down. The P2 is a lovely car, it could be a great car, and we love driving it. But now we also hate everything else about it.
But do we want to reject it? No, we want it to work, but Polestar are pushing us to the point where we may have to walk away,

So, what now? Drop it off at the Dealership with the keys and walk away? Given them another opportunity to put it right and see what materialises? Wait for the next thing to go wrong?

Quite simply, I don’t know, the step step depends on Polestar. Maybe that’s part II….
 

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I was interested to read your long posting about the problems you have had with Polestar Customer Support in particular. It mirrors almost exactly my own experience and, I have to admit, my own rather bitter feeling toward the company that has developed after the experience I have been put through. I, too, want very much for the company to succeed - I love everything about the Polestar 2, or perhaps I should say, what the Polestar 2 is supposed to be. I have followed every step they have taken for the past 18 months and I am one of their most strident supporters. But when the interaction with Polestar Customer Support makes you feel that you've been rather foolish to be so enthusiastic about the company when they clearly don't give a damn, it's a sad state of affairs. At least, that's the impression they create. I was expecting the Volvo dealership to be the weak link in the relationship between customers and Polestar but in fact it's like a breath of fresh air dealing with those people after dealing with the Polestar Customer Support.

Like you I think the most important failings in Polestar Customer Support are their lack of communication and lack of really caring about the precious relationship with the customers, especially the initial ones who have made a leap of faith to purchase the Polestar 2. It seems that we have more invested in the company than any of the staff in Customer Support. The only place my experience differed from your's was the delivery phase. I interacted with the most amazing people for this phase - they were both called Tony. The first Tony (H) was supposed to deliver my car, called the evening before to set it all up and then he had a really serious fall when charging my car at 5 am the morning of the delivery and ended up in hospital with a broken leg and other complications. But he still texted me to make sure everything was OK with the car (which was, BTW, delivered on time and very professionally by the other Tony)! Tony H is passionate about the Polestar 2 and his enthusiasm is contagious. Why can't he run Polestar Customer Support!

I was thinking that perhaps this problem with Polestar Customer Support was limited to the UK, but I found a Norwegian website where they were saying the same things. Clearly the problem stems from the very top of the company. I'm sure Thomas Ingenlath has enough on his plate as CEO but he is essentially a designer, and I wonder if he has not focussed enough on customer support. Has he delegated to someone who is not up to the job? Do they not realize that it doesn't matter how amazing the car is, if you don't get customer support right then forget about success. When they start delivering seriously in North America will they have the same Customer Support failings, because if they do they are finished. The Americans simply will not tolerate this level of customer support. I know - I lived there for 28 years.

I also invoked the 14-day return option on my Polestar because I felt it was not driveable once there was the safety-critical recall issue. That seemed to stir them into action and the next day I was booked into a Volvo dealership for the recall work to be done (which will happen on Monday). I was feeling pretty up-beat about all the problems going away with the pending software update, but your post-update experience is dismal and depressing. By Tuesday morning I may well have returned my Polestar 2. I really don't want to buy a Porsche Taycan (it's too large) but if I have to then I will.

So I wonder how this will all turn out. I am an eternal optimist and I refuse to be deterred. Onward and upward.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
With regards to the WiFi problem, try turning off WPS on your router. That has solved the issue for everyone else who has tried this.
Thanks for this, i was aware. My router is a TP-Link box @ 2.4 and the WPS is button activated for linking and goes off after about 30 seconds.
I think the issues are much more fundamental, sadly.
 

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Maybe it's the eternal pessimist in me, but I generally find support from most companies to be pretty terrible. L1 support is useless regardless of what the item is.

We all want transparent communication but usually it's not that easy. Relationships between companies are complicated and maybe it's Polestar or maybe it was Leaseplan (in my case at least) and Google. Polestar can't throw their partners under the bus so they can explain to us what the hold up is. So either they placate us with bullshit or apologies that don't make anything happen faster...or go radio silence.

Tech and programming is insanely complex. Marketing sells us machine learning futuristic nonsense and it's all bullshit. At the end of the day it's a tough slog by smart people trying to get complex elements to all talk to each other. Everything is rife with bugs and trying to get anything out that is fit for purpose working against a deadline is a nightmare.

Lemons happen. I hope they sort you out to a satisfactory conclusion but it may take time that you're not willing to wait and I think that would be a shame, because when you get it all working it's pretty great
 

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Thanks for this, i was aware. My router is a TP-Link box @ 2.4 and the WPS is button activated for linking and goes off after about 30 seconds.
I think the issues are much more fundamental, sadly.
You need to totally disable WPS. On TP-Link, it's usually under Interface Setup > WiFi. In the Broadcast SSID section, untick 'Use WPS'. Or on some, it's under System Tools > System Parameters
 

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I was thinking that perhaps this problem with Polestar Customer Support was limited to the UK, but I found a Norwegian website where they were saying the same things.
Same in Germany. Here PS doesn't even honor commitments they put in writing in the order conformation (1 year = 2* free wheel change and storage).
 

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Thanks @toscal353 for the detailed, honest, and heartfelt post. Another day of emotional whiplash for me. I had just started getting enthusiastic again now that US deliveries are starting and Polestar is apparently promising to do the major SW update for free regardless of location. But your details make this seem like it is a harder journey than many people will be willing to endure, especially at this price point. Ughh.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks @toscal353 for the detailed, honest, and heartfelt post. Another day of emotional whiplash for me. I had just started getting enthusiastic again now that US deliveries are starting and Polestar is apparently promising to do the major SW update for free regardless of location. But your details make this seem like it is a harder journey than many people will be willing to endure, especially at this price point. Ughh.
Keep the faith! We are hoping that we can get everything sorted out. But remember, keep you expectations low:
Robert Louis Stevenson : "... for to travel hopefully is a better thing than to arrive..."
 

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Really sorry to hear of such bad experiences :(. I remember feeling very envious of you when you received your car as we've exchanged quite a few posts (and a bit of banter :)) over the last few months about it, but now I'm really pleased that our car is either only on a slow boat from China, or hasn't even been loaded on yet (we only know it's come off the production line).

The Polestar 2 has the potential to be a brilliant car, but at the moment it's only brilliant when it's working, and too much of the time, it's not, and for too many people. The car really has been launched to commercial deadlines and milestones, not because it's ready, and they are now paying the price for that decision by losing the very customers they need to kickstart the brand - the loyal EV brigade who will accept teething troubles and can troubleshoot themselves to a large degree. If they can't even keep those people (in which I include myself) happy, then they're in trouble.

This is going to be a complete inferno of a disaster when cars reach the US. There are so many things not finished or reliable about the car, but those guys often live hundreds - in some cases, thousands - of miles from somewhere that can update an ECU. What are they going to do? Fly experts around the US with an ECU upgrade tool on a laptop? If I lived in the US I would have backed away and cancelled my order by now as it's going to end in tears (or, being the US, court cases). And it takes a lot to quell my enthusiasm and perseverance on EVs and tech!

Meanwhile @toscal353 it would appear that Thomas Ingenlath (possibly via a PA, but it appears genuine) has joined the UK Facebook page:

If you can bear to suffer Facebook, it might be worth popping him a message or a post. It probably won't get you very far (being realistic) but there's a reasonable chance he (or a minion) is monitoring these groups to see what people really think.

In any case, gutted for you, basically! :(
 

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I said on one of my earlier posts that I committed to the PS after finally cancelling a TM3 LR which I had ordered first. I did this for the build quality and the unique experience of owning such a low volume car.

I also did it as the TM3 had some features that were incoming but would not have been fitted at my delivery timeframe....some of these are on the PS. These were chrome delete and power tailgate. I also hear that they have now changed the centre console and will be installing a heat pump as per model Y. This last point will take the range into over 300 for sure.

Accepting the build quality is sketchy on a TM3, looks can be divisive.....however they are starting to address some of their issues. PS do need to get their act together and very quickly or I will also be thinking whether this was worth my £50k and revert to my original decision.

I am not a Tesla fan boy but some of the ownership issues are getting me concerned again. The mere fact that many of the issues could be fixed by OTA updates is simply frustrating. Whilst Tesla can be knocked for many things....they do seem to have the tech side and constant updates nailed. Autopilot is one feature they seem to keep improving.

if you do watch Bjorns videos he does seem to rate his Tesla highly.

Trying to keep the faith!
 
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Discussion Starter #20
Thank you @rgledhill and everyone else who has responded to my sad tale and for being so supportive. We remain hopeful that we can resolve our issues and begin to enjoy our P2.
The purpose of my post was to make people aware of the potential problems they may face with their cars. It is very easy to be put off any product because of a small number of complainers, so treat them in context. For every person on this and probably other sites there will be 50 people who are not having problems and are enjoying their cars!
Many new products hit problems when they get to market. The measure of the manufacturer is not whether they have such problems, but more how they deal with those problems when they arise and how they treat their customer base. For me at least, the jury is out on this with Polestar.
 
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