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In comparison, the BMW iX xDrive50 (which I'm taking as the LRDM analogue) is stated as 0-60 in 4.4s and the M60 (LR Perf analogue) is stated as 0-60 in 3.6s.
And BMW is known to underpromise on such numbers.

While 0-60mph/100kph aren't everything, esp for a big SUV, I'm sure a number of folks will look at those specs and make purchasing decisions based on them.
So I hope Polestar is able to actually eke out more acceleration by the time of the reveal/launch - along with the stated cargo capacity and so on.
Not sure, they seem to going the Swedish route of average, fast enough to be considered fast but doesn’t need to be the fastest, just like they did with the P2.

Also the BMW iX is looking to be significantly more expensive than the P3 so I’d guess the P3 will sell anyway when you weigh in price as well.The BMW iX xDrive50 starts at 120k EUR with taxes here and that is higher than Polestar has said as the upper limit for the P3 when they said 75-110k EUR.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Possibly so for some, but this will be the "family car" for us, so such concerns are not top of mind here...certainly not when to the right of a decimal point! ;) Cargo space, seating space/comfort, interior features will be top of the list and I do like the exterior design much more than what I've seen of EQE SUV so far. If it was 6 seconds instead of 5 for 0-100kph, that would still not be a problem. I have another car for such pursuits. 😀
Same for us - will be basing the next decision on how comfortably it hauls 5 of us and our stuff for a possible road trip, relative to pricing. In that sense I expect I'll more gravitate to the P*4.

Just thinking about the market for these larger SUVs in general, there are definitely folks who base purchasing decisions based on the spec sheet wars. Hopefully Polestar manages the marketing and pricing around that well enough to sell like they hope to.
 

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What is dissapointing are the acceleration numbers. If true it establishes that the P3 is much heavier than the P2, eventhough the P2 was already heavier than the competition as it was based off an ICE platform. Weight has always been volvo cars’ biggest problem, it’s very disappointing that P* is continuing this legacy
Mercedes’ flagship EQS SUV which is a larger car with a very similar battery and motor has a better acceleration figure than the P3. I thought Polestar was supposed to be about performance among other key values…
 

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What acceleration qualifies as "performance" for you?
It's all relative. I think this post by someone else from another forum sums it up pretty well:

Yeah, strange flex to tout this as a Performance SUV that "breaks the norm", then quote 0-100kmh times that aren't much different than Volvo's current T8 Recharge lineup of SUVs that, I guess, are meant for picking up the kids from daycare? It just doesn't seem like enough of a differential, particularly with the new crop of BEV Volvos on the way that have the potential to easily match or exceed those stats. Heck the XC40 Recharge already does and that's an aging platform in terms of being built for electric. We'll see when the real world numbers come in, or what the P10 motor does.
The issue is that Polestar themselves have been constantly going on how "this will be something completely different" and "not your traditional slow SUV" and then, if those numbers are correct, are exactly that.

Now you can argue that "5 seconds isn't slow for an SUV" but the fact is, as has been stated here also, it is significantly (on paper, where those comparisons are made) slower that the BMW iX. Cheaper? Sure, but is is in the same class and has been marketed as "performance." Also, if we want to go with the price argument, should we then include Tesla Model Y performance and Kia EV6 GT? Both are cheaper and under 4 second cars.

Polestar wants to make the car a 4.7 or 5 second car? Fine, they are free to do it. But the marketing should reflect the relative landscape.
 

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The issue is that Polestar themselves have been constantly going on how "this will be something completely different" and "not your traditional slow SUV" and then, if those numbers are correct, are exactly that.
The real question is if those numbers are correct. Until P* reveils the true specs it's all guessing. Maybe they have something very special coming, maybe not. We will have to wait and see. If however they lag behind competitors and they will not fulfill their promises, they will have a hard time selling these cars compared to their competitors. The upcoming Volvo may even be more interesting (roomier, more comfy cheaper?) than this car if the specs are true and comparable.

We will have to wait and see if they will fulfill their promises.
 

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Ultimately, I think there are two ways to define "performance". 1) Is this fast enough for me or 2) Is this faster than competitors? I care about #1 and not at all about #2. As for Polestar having to satisfy those who follow #2, the competitive set should be clear, notwithstanding their CEO's claims to "Porsche" positioning. In the U.S., I would expect various buyers will cross-consider Cadillac Lyriq, BMW iX, Fisker Ocean, MB EQE SUV, the eventual XC60 or 90 EV, and other two-row UVs from brands more premium than an average Ford or Chevy (Blazer?). For those prices anticipated or known to range from $60s to $70s (with the possibility that BMW may have overshot the market with price and under-delivered with design), competitive performance can be evaluated. I doubt many or even some will hold up the P3 against a Cayenne to assess performance.
 
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