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Discussion Starter #1
Polestar has a range calculator up on its website for countries like the US, Norway, and Sweden.

It takes into account things like city, country road, or highway driving along with outside temperature, wheels, and air conditioning on/off.

USA

Norway

Sweden
 

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So with AC off at 77 degrees, traveling on ‘country roads’, range= 292

More realistically, traveling on the highway at 77 degrees with AC on, range= 229

We also don’t know what that highway speed is, but I’ll bet it’s not 70. So I would totally disregard the 290+ figure and assume for the kind of driving that most of us do, you’ll get 220-250 miles. Keep in mind that as with all electric cars, you'll get significantly less in cold weather. If that works you’ll be fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So with AC off at 77 degrees, traveling on ‘country roads’, range= 292

More realistically, traveling on the highway at 77 degrees with AC on, range= 229

We also don’t know what that highway speed is, but I’ll bet it’s not 70. So I would totally disregard the 290+ figure and assume for the kind of driving that most of us do, you’ll get 220-250 miles. Keep in mind that as with all electric cars, you'll get significantly less in cold weather. If that works you’ll be fine.
Yeah 292 miles is unbelievable when you consider that it says 275 miles of range on Polestar's website lol.
 

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The reviews coming out now paint a really less rosy picture than that calculator suggests.
nextmove.de travelled at 72 mph using cruise control for 80 mi and saw the battery charge drop by 48%, making for more like a 160 mi real world highway range.

How much of that could be that they were using the Performance Package, which has sticky tires and 20" wheels, which would be heavier and with more rolling resistance?

Something needs to account for the official numbers and this real world difference.
TeslaBjorn found a similar range for the IPace.... but when it was Winter in Norway, not Summer in Germany. And the IPace has a higher Cd, is taller and wider, and has the same exact reported WLTP range (despite a bigger 90 kWh battery).

While this likely would only affect me a few times a year, it's still annoying. If I could reliably get 200 highway miles going on average ~60-70 mph, I'm all good. Hoping 19" non-Performance wheels and software updates fixes things.

But want to be clear - I'm pretty stoked for the P2. This is basically the main nit I'm picking.
 

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Something needs to account for the official numbers and this real world difference.
TeslaBjorn found a similar range for the IPace.... but when it was Winter in Norway, not Summer in Germany. And the IPace has a higher Cd, is taller and wider, and has the same exact reported WLTP range (despite a bigger 90 kWh battery).
EPA, WLTP, and real world range have a completely non-linear relationship:
 

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Polestar has a range calculator up on its website for countries like the US, Norway, and Sweden.

It takes into account things like city, country road, or highway driving along with outside temperature, wheels, and air conditioning on/off.
Polestar has a range calculator up on its website for countries like the US, Norway, and Sweden.

It takes into account things like city, country road, or highway driving along with outside temperature, wheels, and air conditioning on/off.
This is a nice tool, but these are very gross estimates. They have the option of AC, but don't talk about Heat. I believe the 2 has resistance heat which uses a lot more battery than AC. Unless I missed it, I'm surprised they didn't fit the 2 with a heat pump system.
 

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EPA, WLTP, and real world range have a completely non-linear relationship:
There are even other factors. I'm not sure if these cars, when tested, have their HVAC running. If so, is it AC or heat or both at different times? As an example, my fully charged I-Pace can go 245-250 with the AC on. But if I turn off the HVAC on a full charge, my range shows 270-280.

There are just so many variables in these things and we haven't even discussed temperatures & humidity where the AC would have to work harder.
 

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I thought the iPace had a heat pump. If not look for your range to drop 20% in the winter.
 

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EVM on YouTube ( electric vehicle man ) has an informative video setting out why range anxiety is not really justified with 2020 BEVs. Worth a watch.
 

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This is a long winded video to make a pretty simple point. This was also the thinking behind the BMW i3 and Chevy Volt. If you have enough EV range for your daily driving which amounts to 90% of all your driving, then you only used the small engine on the few long trips you take in a year. What he doesn't mention is that the more range you have (i.e. the larger the battery) the less efficient the car becomes because on 90% of your trips you are just lugging around more battery weight. Now that the fast charging infrastructure has been built out fairly significantly in the US and Europe (with even more on the way), it hardly makes sense at all to have more than about 300 miles of range.

And with an EV you start every day with a full tank.
 

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Is it harmful in the long-term to fully recharge your battery every night? Do you need to make sure it's fully discharged before you recharge, for longest battery life?
 

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Is it harmful in the long-term to fully recharge your battery every night? Do you need to make sure it's fully discharged before you recharge, for longest battery life?
You can recharge every night and don't need to fully discharge -- nor would you want to. And using an L2 charger at home is the best way because it's relatively slow. It's not ideal to top off your battery completely every night unless you are planning a long trip the next day and want to start out full. To optimize your battery life you should usually only charge to about 80-90%.
 

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You can recharge every night and don't need to fully discharge -- nor would you want to. And using an L2 charger at home is the best way because it's relatively slow. It's not ideal to top off your battery completely every night unless you are planning a long trip the next day and want to start out full. To optimize your battery life you should usually only charge to about 80-90%.
Interesting! Just to check I understand you, you're saying that for max range and battery life, you should top-up every night with your L2 charger, but set it to max out at 80%. Is that right?
 

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Interesting! Just to check I understand you, you're saying that for max range and battery life, you should top-up every night with your L2 charger, but set it to max out at 80%. Is that right?
  • Max range will require you to top-up the battery. But don't do this every night.
  • Max battery life (meaning less degradation of the battery's max range when full) is achieved by not topping up the battery every night.
  • The battery has an 8 year warranty, so if it really degrades a lot then Volvo will replace it. But 8 years from now you should be in a newer EV with even better stats. :)
 

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  • Max range will require you to top-up the battery. But don't do this every night.
  • Max battery life (meaning less degradation of the battery's max range when full) is achieved by not topping up the battery every night.
  • The battery has an 8 year warranty, so if it really degrades a lot then Volvo will replace it. But 8 years from now you should be in a newer EV with even better stats. :)
This is my plan:
  • Drive around until battery is at ~10-20%
  • Charge up to 80% (using L1/L2 generally)
  • For the occasional long road trip, top up to 90-95%, and save L3 charging for these longer trips

That reasonable?
Is there any guidance re charging all the way to 100%? Ok to do so occasionally - or never do it, going to 90-95% as a hard max?
 

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This is my plan:
  • Drive around until battery is at ~10-20%
  • Charge up to 80% (using L1/L2 generally)
  • For the occasional long road trip, top up to 90-95%, and save L3 charging for these longer trips
That reasonable?
Is there any guidance re charging all the way to 100%? Ok to do so occasionally - or never do it, going to 90-95% as a hard max?
Charging to 100% is certainly ok occasionally. Particularly when you need max range. But you don't need to run the battery down to 10-20% every time. This is a LI battery, not the old style NM. There is no "memory". Since at home on L2 you can't get more than about 25-30mph of charge, you don't want your range dropping so low that you can't go out again if you need to run an errand or have an emergency. You can keep the car plugged in every night and set the max charge to 85% and you'll be fine.
 

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Much depends on how much the manufacturer 'protects' the upper end of the battery. Tesla essentially had no upper protection and 100% was actually 100% charged. Other manufacturers may leave a 5% or more buffer. In those cases it's safer to fully charge the battery since 100% may actually be 95% or less. But if you really don't need that full charge, there's probably no reason to do that.
 

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Most of the reviews I have read / watched say 220 miles is a realistic average in moderate weather. They also note that most have the performance pack and they are driving it hard / fast a lot of the time, and you could get some more miles out of it when driving more relaxed.
 

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All the studies done on this show that something like 80% drivers travel less than 50 miles/day. Unless you regularly travel more than 100 miles from home it's almost a moot point. You'll use it fast charger several times a year at best. For the small minority with regular and ongoing enhanced range needs, maybe an EV is not the best choice yet no matter its stated range.
 
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