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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just did a test drive with a Volkswagen ID.3 First, which was configured somewhere halfway between the Pro S and the Tour models that I'm eyeing. The First has the medium sized battery, though. It had ACC and lane keeping, but not the hifi sound system nor electric chairs. Hmm, that sounds a bit strange. I mean electrically adjustable, of course.

But electric chair isn't far from the truth. Take your average uncomfortable 1960s chair in wood or hard plastic and it'll probably be more comfortable. I've driven lots of cars (doing car sharing and a bit of rental gets you more types of cars than average) and I cannot remember one being this bad. It may be okay if the ride hadn't been so hard, too, but the combo was... well, pretty bad. There's 'ergoActive' seats in more expensive options, but the chairs weren't the only thing.

There's this tiny dashboard fixed to the steering wheel. For some reason, VW decided it was a good idea to have it move closer or further away with the steering wheel. Now, my eyes are gettting a bit worse. And with the steering wheel in my preferred position, the dashboard was on the edge of me needing my reading glasses. Whereas, of course, the little infotainment screen and the road, I can't see them with reading glasses on.

Then there's the infamous controls under the infotainment screen. The representative said they were buttons but everybody mistook them for sliders. In any case, they're on a ridge which is just perfect to rest your thumb on while you stab at the screen. So every time I used the radio or anything else, I accidentally raised the volume or the temperature. Then there's the controls on the steering wheel. They felt like they were supposed to give haptic feedback, or like there were two levels of click (push soft and push through). I thoroughly disliked the whole experience. While there may be a few improvements in the more expensive model, I don't think I want to have any part of it. It's scratched out firmly off my shortlist.
 

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This is helpful. I have friends and colleagues coming to me for advice on electric cars and I try to be objective stating that there are lots of great options out there. I've mentioned the id.3 to some of them. Now I'll be sure to say it's out there, but there are reasons to be sure to test drive it first.

Which seems strange for me to say, right? I mean, everybody takes the time to test drive a car before they drop all that coin. But then, I never touched a Polestar 2 until I touched the one I had already bought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah, a test drive is a good idea. I'm taking my time because no matter which model it will be, it'll be a big chunk of money. The ID.3 sounded very good spec-wise but reviews already indicated it was a cheapish car with a big battery slapped on. So I really wanted to find out myself. I've driven several VWs in the past, from a Golf type 2 (probably from 1985) up to a Golf Plus from around 2012. I liked most rather well. They compensate being dull with being reliable, which is a pretty good trade-off in my book. But the ID.3 and me just didn't get along. I have already met happy drivers, but it's not for me.

BTW, I booked a second visit to the Polestar showroom on the 29th, the day before my visit to Ford to see the Mach E. I'll have the Polestar fresh in my mind and will decide in the week right after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Must mention something positive. The Kia has fore wheel drive, and the ID.3 has rear wheel drive. Where the Kia had spinning wheels and traction control engaging all the time, the ID.3 was perfect. I went crazy taking off into a bend, but still no spins. That was pretty good. The drive generally was quite good and trustworthy.
 

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Ah, ID.3, one of the few cars I can talk about in detail. I rented one to help a family member relocate. Did 4 trips of around 800km each, and some smaller trips, all adding up to about 4000km. I drove the thing on highways, shitty roads, over mountains and in mostly cold weather, including one storm and one sort-of-blizzard with gusts up to 80km/h! Here's a summary; please feel free to ask any questions you may have.

Efficiency: Great on longer trips with decent weather and speeds up to 100km/h; I got about 160Wh/km. Not great at higher speeds and on short trips in cold weather; varies from 230Wh/km to 320Wh/km. The first few kilometers show me anything between 480Wh/km and 740Wh/km, admittedly with a hill as soon as I go out of my parking spot and with temperatures down to -20 degrees Celcius.

Charging: Decent when battery is hot and weather is good; bad otherwise. Never got over 46kW even on 150kW chargers with low SOC in cold weather.

Comfort: Not good. The seats are uncomfortable, and the arm-rest is really uncomfortable. I've just folded the armrest away and never use it. I hate the fact that everything is so non-ergonomic and "flat" in this car.

Info system: There's no "tainment" here; it's a German car so it means business. The sound sucks; even at 25% of max. volume, it produces tinniness and some weird rattle in the door handle on the inside. The maps are outdated and often lead me into weird streets off course. But the thing I hate the most are "touch" buttons which are non-intuitive, distracting and don't do what you want them to do. There are a LOT of software bugs in this car; some annoying and some downright scary.

Driving: It's quick compared to any fossil car twice its price available in Norway. Cornering is fine in dry conditions, but even with top of the shelf winter tyres, there's a lot of slip at the back in winter conditions when roads are full of snow/ice/slush. However, it doesn't slip while braking; only while accelerating. I've come to the conclusion that it has a bad ESC system. The suspension is not tuned for comfort at least, so every pothole/bump is felt right in the guts. It is fairly quiet except on roads with snow/ice/slush.

Practicality: It's a very practical car for the money. Hatchback, big doors, wide enough seats, good visibility etc. etc. Almost full marks here.

Who would I recommend this car to?
A person who drives alone or with mostly one other person, primarily in the city or inter-city (irrespective of the distance). It is not a good car (IMO) for going to the mountains, driving on bad roads, or for a couple with 1+ kids/dogs.
 

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I don't believe it's fair to compare an ID.3 with the P2. They are in different classes. A better comparison will be the ID.4.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't believe it's fair to compare an ID.3 with the P2. They are in different classes. A better comparison will be the ID.4.
Well, I'm shopping more based on the size of the car than the price point (there's an upper limit of course...) The ID.4 is much, much bigger. The booth is almost 40% bigger than the Polestar's. I don't need a big transporter like that.

Even comparing the ID.3 to cars that aren't in the luxury segment, it fares pretty badly. The Kia was much more traditional, with lots of buttons, but much better as far as controls and seats were concerned. And the car sharing system I currently use (Cambio) has lots of Citroen C3s, some of them almost 10 years old. They're all much more enjoyable to drive than the ID.3. So is the Renault Zoe, which is another price category down from the ID.3. So my evaluation wasn't just based on the better fit and finish of the Polestar.
 

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We were considering the ID.3 against the Polestar as well, as a replacement for our Hyundai Kona Electric. You can't compare them directly as they are a very different price point and premium level, but you can certainly consider them against each other generally.

I was disappointed when I saw the size and shape of the ID.4 - it's a huge barge that will no doubt suit families who like to run big, poorly-packaged SUVs but didn't even figure in our considerations.
 

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Well, I'm shopping more based on the size of the car than the price point (there's an upper limit of course...) The ID.4 is much, much bigger. The booth is almost 40% bigger than the Polestar's. I don't need a big transporter like that.

Even comparing the ID.3 to cars that aren't in the luxury segment, it fares pretty badly. The Kia was much more traditional, with lots of buttons, but much better as far as controls and seats were concerned. And the car sharing system I currently use (Cambio) has lots of Citroen C3s, some of them almost 10 years old. They're all much more enjoyable to drive than the ID.3. So is the Renault Zoe, which is another price category down from the ID.3. So my evaluation wasn't just based on the better fit and finish of the Polestar.
We were considering the ID.3 against the Polestar as well, as a replacement for our Hyundai Kona Electric. You can't compare them directly as they are a very different price point and premium level, but you can certainly consider them against each other generally.

I was disappointed when I saw the size and shape of the ID.4 - it's a huge barge that will no doubt suit families who like to run big, poorly-packaged SUVs but didn't even figure in our considerations.
All this makes sense. Of course here in the states I don't think the ID.3 is even available, and of course here drivers are very much into barges. 😀
 

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Wow! Yes! Although we don't have braking issues.
 

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Interesting how he's not thrilled with the seat being the on/off switch. I'm not thrilled with that either and I wonder how long the concept will last.
 

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Interesting how he's not thrilled with the seat being the on/off switch. I'm not thrilled with that either and I wonder how long the concept will last.
Unfortunately I think it will continue ... it may get smarter like keep everything on for 1-2 min's unless the doors are looked, or something similar ... but it seems to be the new trend that won't go away.

Other examples :
  • Fake Exhaust Pipes on ICE cars.
  • Fake Air Vents.
  • Fake Engine noises (both on ICE and EV's).
  • Electronic Door Handles - yes I get its more aerodynamic, but they fail all the time and freeze in place!
  • Less Buttons and more functions in touch screen - the Polestar / Mach-E are the least offending as the temperature is always there on the screen, and both have volume knobs, but with Tesla now removing indicator and wiper stalks others will follow.
  • Oversized front fake Grilles - I don't mind a little grille but seen the latest Audi's , Lexus, and BMW's?
  • Fake Carbon Fibre
  • PINAO BLACK TRIM !!!!!
 

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Less Buttons and more functions in touch screen - the Polestar / Mach-E are the least offending as the temperature is always there on the screen, and both have volume knobs, but with Tesla now removing indicator and wiper stalks others will follow.
Sadly I agree with most of your examples. But this one I think has a limit, and Tesla has over stepped it. I believe the reason this has been trending is cost. But I also believe that safety will bring back a certain number of buttons. Tesla may continue to be the exception, but I think that's because their goal is self driving with no input needed - so no tactile interface is necessary.
 

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Interesting how he's not thrilled with the seat being the on/off switch. I'm not thrilled with that either and I wonder how long the concept will last.
I’d be fine with the seat turning things on automatically. But I wish I could still manually turn off (and thus also manually on once already sitting).
 

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I’d be fine with the seat turning things on automatically. But I wish I could still manually turn off (and thus also manually on once already sitting).
The concept of touching a button to energize the car is so mundane that I can't imagine why they thought it was a good idea to get rid of it except that it's cool :cool: Heck, I'd venture that the sensor in the seat also costs more than a push button on the dash.
 

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For those who think a Heat Pump will be the magical solution for EV's and the Polestar will gain 50+ extra miles in winter ...

3874


The overall difference is 8% in real world tests at -9C

Original Video here:-



For clarity I'm not dimissing some people might need that heat pump if they have a lot of cold weather each year, but for people in the UK 1-3 months max of below 5C is rare.
 
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