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hehe, no, there is a little downhill stretch, but also uphill to offset. No special driving, just jumped in this morning and drove to dealers.

30's 40's, and 50's mph roads usual morning rush hour traffic. I was quite surprised to see that hence the picture, I'm non-PP and 20" wheels.
 

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Maybe this has already been mentioned, but I would be curious to know if the WLTP difference comes only from the 20" wheels between PP and non-PP; would the damping / ground clearance (or the orange belts) have an impact too?
 

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I am posting this in the hope that someone will take a little time to ease the range anxiety of a 70+ year old about to take our P2 on a journey from Northumberland to Bury St Edmunds to Canterbury to Dorset to Shrewsbury to home. What distances should I aim to cover between charges? Which charging companies’ accounts should I open and which charging cards should I carry? Is Zap-Map the best planning ap or should I trust the car’s Google maps? And any other info that might help.
 

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I am posting this in the hope that someone will take a little time to ease the range anxiety of a 70+ year old about to take our P2 on a journey from Northumberland to Bury St Edmunds to Canterbury to Dorset to Shrewsbury to home. What distances should I aim to cover between charges? Which charging companies’ accounts should I open and which charging cards should I carry? Is Zap-Map the best planning ap or should I trust the car’s Google maps? And any other info that might help.
Have you tried checking out your route in A Better Routeplanner ?
That gives a good indication of feasibility and where and how often to charge. To get the best accuracy, specify Polestar 2 in settings (cog wheel in the main route settings window)

Then, if the weather is more like 10-15C instead of 20-25C, click the "Detailed" tab and set the "reference consumption" to 370 Wh/mi (current default is 327 Wh/mi, which might work for warmer weather but not for colder weather).

Put in your route just like you would for Google Maps or the like and see what that planner says. I'd trust the planner to find the appropriate number of charging stops and then myself would add 5 min buffer per charging stop on what it says.

For bonus type A OCD planner points, I'd cross check the suggested charging stops against what ZapMap or PlugShare says to check reliability.

Further upside is if you're logged in both on your laptop/desktop and in the app in the car, once you set a route on one it should be available on the other. And the car's app would be even more accurate from the get go and be able to sync with the car's Google Maps to a certain degree, which only seems to be getting smoother with time.

As for your particular route, I have no idea since I'm still unconvinced that the UK isn't fictional.
 

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I am posting this in the hope that someone will take a little time to ease the range anxiety of a 70+ year old about to take our P2 on a journey from Northumberland to Bury St Edmunds to Canterbury to Dorset to Shrewsbury to home. What distances should I aim to cover between charges? Which charging companies’ accounts should I open and which charging cards should I carry? Is Zap-Map the best planning ap or should I trust the car’s Google maps? And any other info that might help.
First off Google maps in the car is generally very accurate, at worst +/- a few % out on a long drive depending on speed +/- 70mph.

Next question is can you charge at any of these stops? Even if using a 3-Pin.
How long are the stops each - Hours / days?

Northumberland to Bury St Edmunds = 265 miles. You will defiantly need to charge on the way - good thing is that there are new 150kW (and atm free) Moto services at Rugby - Ok that's 215 (ish) so you'll need 15+ deg weather and leave at 100% to get there with 10-20% left. Although I'd be happy, if your first trip it might be nervous to do over 200miles, and/or if 5deg's you will need to stop on the way ... so find something on the A1(M) even if it's for 10mins, then top up at Rugby.

Bury St Edmunds to Canterbury to Dorset = 125 miles. Best place to stop on the way (assuming you are low on battery %) is Braintree Electric Forecourt. It's not even a detour it's just via A134 than the A11, but cheap & 150kW chargers! Honestly worth the trip via there even if you don't need the charge just to see the future!

Canterbury to Dorset = 180 miles. Now without knowing what your % will be, all I can say is there is a really good charger at a Shell Garage at Chandler's Ford just of the M3. Expensive but 150kW so quick.

Dorset to Shrewsbury = 200 Miles. You can do this easily ... as long as temps are above 10deg's C. I don't know the M5 that well but I'm sure there are a few places to pop off for a quickie to make sure you get there.

Shrewsbury to Northumberland = 250 Miles. You'll defiantly need to charge on the way. I don't know that area very well so see below for guides. If you go up and over Manchester I have no idea ... if you go via Birmingham there is a 150kW Shell of the M6.

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OK range will depend on temperature and speed. You could be at 200miles for 100% or 240+ miles @ 70mph. Drop to 60mph and you might get 260+ at 20deg's C.

Really you should be looking at finding a place to charge between 10-20% - I'd go lower now I've done a few trips, but if your first don't go lower than 10% as you'll need that in case you need to go to the next charger. Once you get confidence at knowing the chargers that work and that google % is ok to trust, you'll be able to push a little more.

So assuming the worst case scenario of 200 miles, that's 20 miles per 10%. Also you don't want to charge above 80% at any fast charger.

So again using 200miles as worst case.

100% - 20% = 160 miles.
80% - 20% = 120 miles - rinse and repeat.

Now that's really worst case scenario. So to answer your question, you should easily be able to 2 miles per % ... in 20deg C heat you should be going as high as 2.5 per %! If you are getting closer to 2.5 miles per % then that 120 miles from 80 to 20% battery just become 150!


Zap-Map = Best app to use for checking the status of the next planned chargers.

A Better Route Planner = Best app for general route planning and charging points. (also ABRP is now in the Polestar's Google Store Page!)


Problem is without know if you can get any charge at the destinations it's hard to say.

IMHO find locations with multiple charger (2+) that way there is a good chance that one will work.
Find all the App's you'll need or think you might need now.
Always have a backup charger if the first place is out of order.
Only use Ionity if desperate as they charge 70p per kWh. BP works fine if you use the RFID (Contactless is flaky), Osprey / Instavolt are brilliant (both contactless and reliable), the one's I listed above are all good stops too.

Try and find 150kW chargers where possible for quick 15-30min stops, and 50kW chargers for those Lunch breaks of 45-60min's.

Let us know how it goes!

ps. If this is a speed race ... and you just need to do it as fast as possible ... even though this might sound odd, go down to =<10% battery and only charge back to 60-65% ... you'll stop more but spend less time overall that 800ish mile trip. 60-80% can take 1/2 the time it took to go from 5% to 60%.
 

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Oct '20 / VIN47xx. Void, Slate, 20"
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Discussion Starter · #486 · (Edited)
take our P2 on a journey from Northumberland to Bury St Edmunds to Canterbury to Dorset to Shrewsbury to home
Similar to what @GDank said, if you're travelling on fast A-roads and motorways, I'd estimate that you'll comfortably get about 170miles between charges (charging to ~90% and running down to low-teens%) unless you have a really heavy right foot.

For example, in October last year (at <10C) I did the ~170miles from Cambridge Ionity to South Manchester (via A14 and M6), using about 75% SOC. (This was taking it relatively easy - cruise control at 70mph most of the way).

Personally, I'd have a look on ABRP and Zapmap in advance and try to plan out where you plan to stop based on this, but have some backups/alternatives in mind if your consumption ends up higher than expected, or the chargers are full/not working.
 

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Polestar 2 Dual Motor, Long Range, Midnight (blue), charcoal interior, non-PP
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For the record, a cross-country blast on fast, sweeping A-roads mixed with 30mph towns and villages in 20C today...

6058


(Apologies for the dreadful picture, I was trying to minimise reflections in the sunlight).

That works out at 267 miles from a full battery, which while still 10ish% short of the WLTP, is really pretty decent.

And believe me, I was not hanging around! The overtaking acceleration in the Polestar is just remarkable, silently slingshotting past the frustrating 43mph Grandads, dreaded motorhomes failing to get up a 1 in 1000 slope, and hypermiling Leaf drivers. It's also incredibly composed around the tight corners, both while braking and accelerating, without feeling like it might switch ends. Best driving car I've owned since the Subaru Impreza Turbo 2000, which actually had a higher power-to-weight ratio than the Polestar (265bhp, 1250kg = 212bhp/tonne vs 400bhp, 2200kg = 181bhp/tonne) and was far more nimble.

After nearly 4 hours of driving (including a short break for a wander round and lunch), I stepped out as fresh as a daisy. This is one seriously good all-rounder!
 

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For the record, a cross-country blast on fast, sweeping A-roads mixed with 30mph towns and villages in 20C today...

View attachment 6058

(Apologies for the dreadful picture, I was trying to minimise reflections in the sunlight).

That works out at 267 miles from a full battery, which while still 10ish% short of the WLTP, is really pretty decent.

And believe me, I was not hanging around! The overtaking acceleration in the Polestar is just remarkable, silently slingshotting past the frustrating 43mph Grandads, dreaded motorhomes failing to get up a 1 in 1000 slope, and hypermiling Leaf drivers. It's also incredibly composed around the tight corners, both while braking and accelerating, without feeling like it might switch ends. Best driving car I've owned since the Subaru Impreza Turbo 2000, which actually had a higher power-to-weight ratio than the Polestar (265bhp, 1250kg = 212bhp/tonne vs 400bhp, 2200kg = 181bhp/tonne) and was far more nimble.

After nearly 4 hours of driving (including a short break for a wander round and lunch), I stepped out as fresh as a daisy. This is one seriously good all-rounder!
I'm getting similar numbers in the warmer weather and with the latest update. And yes, this is one fantastic car to drive long distances in :D
 

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P2 2021, Void, Charcoal, no PP, 19 inch
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For some the range is not something to worry about at all and i am one of them, but for me it remains interesting to know how close we get to the promised WLTP value of 470 km. Made a long drive yesterday (a lot of highway) of 356 km. Had it loaded 100%. When I got home in the evening I had 18% / 85 kilometers left. That would give me then a range of 440 km. The average of 17.3 kwh/100km is nice. If there would not have been highway speed (105 km/h mostly) in my drive but only 50/80 km roads the 470 km must certainly be possible i think.
6060
 

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I did my first longish trip yesterday (for me anyway) where I would likely have to charge (rather than just novelty value), 220mile round trip to Cheddar Gorge for a MTB event. I had a roof rack on, and the bike on top which obviously increased drag but got a respectable 37kWh/100mi overall (I did get 9kWh/100mi coming down the gorge though :) A quick 15min charge near my destination was all I needed, and made it back home at 19%. ACC and pilot assist does make motorway driving less tiring, and I like the 5mph increments which are great for overtaking.
 

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Polestar 2, 2021, Snow, non-PP, Tow bar, launch edition
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I did my first longish trip yesterday (for me anyway) where I would likely have to charge (rather than just novelty value), 220mile round trip to Cheddar Gorge for a MTB event. I had a roof rack on, and the bike on top which obviously increased drag but got a respectable 37kWh/100mi overall (I did get 9kWh/100mi coming down the gorge though :) A quick 15min charge near my destination was all I needed, and made it back home at 19%. ACC and pilot assist does make motorway driving less tiring, and I like the 5mph increments which are great for overtaking.
Very similar experience on a 210 mile trip last weekend. Managed to get 31.7 kWh/100 miles with four passengers and some stuff in boot. Was low 20's C and needed a 15 charge on the way back at BP Pulse 50kW charger. I mainly used Google Maps to locate chargers but found Zapmaps gave me a slightly better suggestion on my route back, which I ended up using. What was really nice was getting Google maps to suggest restaurants to stop at on the return trip and we ended up finding a top notch place for dinner. Being able to use voice commands to find the restaurant, get the nav set to the required destination and call the restaurant without the need to lift a hand off the wheel was amazing.
 

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We need a metric thread and an imperial thread.

Speaking in miles is so foreign to me.
I know there are calculations to do to convert kWh/miles to KM… blahhh math.

Why can’t we all just get along and SWITCH to Metric 😀
We tried a few times. This country is simply too stupid to accomplish it 🙄
 

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We tried a few times. This country is simply too stupid to accomplish it 🙄
Real story. When I had a transmission developed for an electric vehicle application in Europe by the US design team, we of course asked for this to be designed in mm. When the first design came back to Europe I asked the CAD team to make a 1:1 printout for the office. They came back and told me it would not fit the wall. It was designed in inches that where called mm ... the oil content was 36 m3 :) .
 

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Real story. When I had a transmission developed for an electric vehicle application in Europe by the US design team, we of course asked for this to be designed in mm. When the first design came back to Europe I asked the CAD team to make a 1:1 printout for the office. They came back and told me it would not fit the wall. It was designed in inches that where called mm ... the oil content was 36 m3 :) .
Perfect 😆
 

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I taught bridge design in SI units for about a decade. With much regret, I switched back to US Customary units. Metric just didn't take.
I did my mandatory army service as a mechanical engineer. My task was to calculate the NATO classification for bridges (using metric). Up to then this was done by hand, the PC did not yet exist. I brought in my BBC computer, spend three months programming and fully automated the required stress calculations for wheel and track vehicles. The thing took up to two days to go through all. But I fully automated my task, spend my time doing sports.
 

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Bjorn's repeat of the 1000km challenge in a PP car with v1.7 software shows a dramatic improvement:

tldw: Did the challenge in Temps = -1-8C (avg 2C) on winter tires in 10:40 hrs:min, compared to 11:30 soon after launch.
In comparison a 2021 Model 3 LR in -2-2C (avg 0C) did it in 10:25, though in summer temps 17-22C (avg 20C) the newest Model 3 got 9:20

So can conclude that winter matters in terms of the both temps and tires. And Polestar's software team really is making relevant improvements, despite all the grief we (I) give them here.
And honestly, if those are the magnitude of differences compared to the Model 3LR - especially comparing with the relatively inefficient P*2 PP - I'm completely happy.

full data here:
 
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