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When I test drove the XC40 BEV I saw they only listed the %SOC gauge. Pretty sure that's the right way to go.

We all deal with just that battery % info on our phones, laptops, etc. We all know "OK 10% left... yeah probably should plug in" or "80%? oh I'm fine"
Displaying a GOM %SOC<->mi/km conversion is incredibly error prone, misleading, and basically leads to this whole thread.
And every ICE I had before an EV I just had a fuel gauge - I'd have to go into a sub menu to find the estimated range left. Why should that be different on an EV?

Just show the % left. Everyone will come up with their own way to deal with that info as they need, and as they do now, just without the aggravation that the GOM induces.
This has been my argument all along. The presentation is all wrong. Who ever came up with "range" anyway?
 

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There are two things an ICE is better at; Range and fast refueling. Everything else I consider better on my EV. I have learned to live with the two disadvantages of the EV and enjoy all the benefits and will never go back to an ICE as my everyday car. Driving an ICE is not the solution for our future.
 

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Polestar 2 Dual Motor Launch Edition 2021 - Void
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The range conversation/complaint is something I've seen played out more times than I can count in the last 8 years.
Specifically, expectations that the arbitrary comparison number (NEDC/EPA/WLTP) isn't achievable in the season/manner/usage pattern a new owner expected.
"Real world" range isn't something that is hard to find lot's of info about, down to the specific model/configuration for...
I know full well what I'm getting into and what I can expect. I was only really looking at the P2 and the XC40 and I checked videos on real world range in various circumstances. My guage is one of my clients is about 150km away (so 300km roundtrip) which the XC40 would never make due to a quick drop in range when hitting the highway and the P2 should be fine for.

I already know that in winter I'll have to drive there on ACC at 100, as there are no chargers there. And when I drive to the office in Belgium I can drive faster and use the right foot a bit more because that's more like a 200km roundtrip + chargers at the office. So I won't have to care so much. And for the client I've even already figured out a country roads route which shaves off about 80km of the round trip and less highway so more efficient driving. It's only about 10m slower anyway.

I'll still have a period to really adjust to the switch from ICE to EV, fast chargers, range and driving (I'll have to sometimes drive a lot more conservative than I normally do). But I know what I can expect from the P2 as far as range is concerned.
 

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Void, Slate, Non-PP on 19's
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A fair few of our forum members are a lot more tolerant than me. I gave the benefit of the doubt initially, but clearly brick wall not getting through.
I suspect they were trying to build support to challenge the use of WLTP as misleading - a not unreasonable goal given that EPA is far closer to real world. Yes ultimately that is a fools errand given that no number is truly realistic, but it is certainly "better" IMHO. That being said though, making the "you're all in the pay of Polestar" jibe 3 times, and then claiming it as banter. Banter! Of all things. That word that has now been indelible linked to the excuses of those making racist and sexist comments - really! Communicating through the written word is hard as we all know, but no indication of humour that I could see.

Anyway. Rant = off :)
 

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Thunder, non PP, towbar
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Meanwhile for all of you who enjoyed Groundhog Day check out Palm Springs.

 

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So comparing to a XC90 as the OP mentioned this was his last car.

EngineOfficial MPGReal MPG AvgDifference (avg)
D545.6 - 49.633.9 mpg72%
T534.9–35.828.3 mpg80%
T634.1–36.724.6 mpg70%
T8108.636.6 mpg34%
Polestar 2 LR-DM*300 miles23578.3%

*I used the DM version as I don't have personal data on the LR-SM version and didn't want to say on speculation or other people's data. In addition I didn't use winter range as all EV's have less range during the winter.

Also note that "Range" is based on motorway ranges as that's generally the only time you need the range ... unless a you are an Uber driver in a city.
 

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magnesium/slate/19"/tow/18xxx
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There are two things an ICE is better at; Range and fast refueling. Everything else I consider better on my EV. I have learned to live with the two disadvantages of the EV and enjoy all the benefits and will never go back to an ICE as my everyday car. Driving an ICE is not the solution for our future.
My colleague drives a BMW 330e plug-in hybrid, 40 km electric range and 40-something litre fuel tank. This means that it can do 40 km electric and then guzzles 11l/100km to drag along the dead weight of the battery and electric drivetrain.

Took it once on a round trip Ghent-Mannheim-Ghent, and guess what... we had to stop 3 times to refuel on a busy weekday, so queuing at the gas station was standard. Stay with the car in the queue and while refueling. Loo-stop and coffee break afterwards. At least 30 min per stop.

Yes, all coincidence but my point being that ICE as a PHEV is not necessarily better than BEV at long distance travel these days
 

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Ordered MY 2022 on Friday 13th of August! Long Range Dual-Motor, Snow/Nappa, Pilot, Plus, Tow hitch
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I'd like to share my own worries, frustrations and incomprehension before "making the shift", which resulted in me placing an order with Polestar.

The moment the P2 was announced, I fell in love with it. It looked great, appeared to tick all the boxes, and the first pre-production review concluded that if you were considering buying a Polestar 2, there was no reason not to.

Then the car was launched and reports started to come in that the WLTP range of 470km was way off. I think Bjørn Nyland's reviews were some of the worst in that respect, as the car gradually earned a reputation for being excessively thirsty and was being marketed with completely unrealistic range claims. At this point I went as far as paying a non-refundable deposit on a Tesla Model 3, which I had always disliked as a car. Checking in with my local Polestar space didn't help either, as one of their crew reported using almost a full battery to drive 232km (144 miles) - I still don't know how he drove to achieve that.

I have a "standard" long run of just over 600km that I need to be able to drive in one day to visit family. On Norwegian roads that equates to about 10:30 hours of driving time including a few ferry breaks. I had decided ahead of time that any car that couldn't manage that with no more than one charge stop would be ruled-out. It seemed clear that the Polestar wouldn't make it.

However, I still couldn't get the car out of my head and wrote to the Polestar space asking if I could borrow a car to test out the trip. Kudos to the local PS space for agreeing!

As luck would have it, I ended up driving in some of the worst conditions I had ever experienced for the journey. Starting off in a storm, with long detours for the first ferry, then worsening winter conditions for the rest of the trip, culminating on the return in some of the slipperiest roads and thickest snowfall I have ever had to drive. Not only that, but an impending ferry-strike meant that I had to cancel my rest day and drive straight back the next day. A total of 1230km and well over 20 hours of driving time.

Paradoxically, if the conditions hadn't been so bad, I might not have been so impressed with the car. Not only did it handle the road conditions impeccably, but I arrived at both ends feeling less tired than normal, despite (or perhaps because of) the added time for charge stops, which totalled about 50 minutes each way in those wintry conditions.

The trip completely changed the way I think about range. Now, instead of asking how far the car goes, I ask if it goes far enough to reach the next natural break and charge quickly enough for me to continue my journey after a cup of coffee (no need for cup-holders) and a toilet break. In the case of the Polestar, the answer is a clear YES!
In fact, after the P1.7 update, the important 10-60% charge time is reduced and the heat pump should shave an extra couple of battery percentage points off the consumption in similar conditions.

I can't agree too much with those who have already suggested that focussing on range is missing the point about electric driving.

For those who are still on-the-fence and worrying whether the car will go far enough, I would just urge you to look at your normal day-to-day journey requirements, the charger infrastructure and how fast you intend to drive, and ask whether a small change in journey habits might be all you need?

If I had daily, long-distance Autobahn commutes in Germany, I'm still not sure the Polestar would be my first choice. But I don't, and I shouldn't rank range requirements for that kind of driving as a major factor when choosing a car for Norwegian conditions with the occasional European trip.

Just my two-halfpenny worth.
 

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...I arrived at both ends feeling less tired than normal, despite (or perhaps because of) the added time for charge stops...
We talk to little about this. Driving an EV (at least the P*) is so much more relaxing than my previous MY2016 Audi A4 (with aucistic windows and pretty much all other boxes ticked when ordering it). I arrive much less tired in the P*. I guess it's the lack och vibrations, gear shifting, vibrations/slack in drive train etc. The A4 was also somewhat bulit for +140km/h whereas the P* is as good at 100kmh as 140kmh. I was often a bit stressed in 100-110kmh in the Audi since it was a bit to slow because of the gear ratio on 7th gear.
 

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But people also complained like babies, about the NEDC numbers, so they came up with WLTP. It's better for ICE cars, still not realistic, but still, it's better :)
My Golf GTD had a NEDC number of 21,7 km/l = a range of 1085 km. If i recall correctly, the WLTP is 18,7 km/l = 935 km.
Over 80.000 km, my average is 15,31 km/l. The best i have done is 17,99 km/l.
I loved the car, and was happy every day. I plan on living the same way, when i get my P2 in January :)

The problem is, that some people simply don't get it. WLTP is a lab test, to compare cars, as best as possible. AND it was made for ICE cars.
BEV simply just take a big hit in the winter, because they don't have and abundance of waste heat, as ICE cars do. And you will just have to live with it.

I think that part of the problem is, that some stil drive it like a ICE car. The only plug it in, when they are low on juice = Every time they start the car, it uses the battery to heat the battery and cabin.
Instead, plug it in, and precondition the car before you unplug, and a lot for the problems would be solved :)
 

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I drive to work a trip of 31 odd miles using mixed roads of 20, 30, 40, 50 and 70mph the best figures in my LRSM are just a tad over 22kWh per 100 miles and the worst are 25.7kWh I got the car on 4th November and the temp has been hovering between 4 Celsius and 10 Celsius. Giving me a range of over 300miles on a full charge.

I won’t get them figures on the motorway but using the polestar website to calculate range etc, it’s not far off being accurate for me. It all depends on how heavy you are with your right foot, driving with cruise control on won’t give you the best figures or range as the car will use more power to go up a slight incline. Keeping the car at a steady pace is key for range, slowing down and speeding up won’t help.

I travelled from London to Northants on Wednesday night, using the m25 and M1 then country roads to get home, started off with 74% SOC finished with 41% SOC for 94 miles. If you want range adjust your driving style, if you want fun stop saying car isn’t giving me the range lol.

The P2 is a joy to drive. It don’t matter if you drive economically or race it it’s just pure enjoyment, for me anyways,
 

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So I scared myself silly this evening. Interested to hear if anyone else has had something similar. Drove up to my parents today. Brixham to Ellesmere Port, about 260 miles. 2 charging stops and arrived on 8%. I had tried to get a bit of juice at instavolt Childer Thornton, but only 1 stall worked and that was in use. As my mother was watching Strictly I decided to go back to the instavolt and get 10 mins or so of charging in. Imagine my shock when I got in the car and I only had 3% left. Woah! Where did that 5% go! Real squeaky bum time! Fortunately I got there fine and managed to get 20 mins ish of charging in and am now at 30%.

I normally plug in straight after such a long journey, so no idea if that energy was lost to cooling fans or something from a hot battery pack. Or maybe it's P1.7 silliness. Thoughts gratefully received!
 
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