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This forum has been very helpful to me, so I thought I'd offer a few practical, daily-driver observations. I've had the car for 20 days and put 600 miles on it.

So here's how the P2 handles 3 common everyday situations: highway merging, parking, and 100+ mile trips.

Highway merging: I live in LA and regularly use 3 different highways. My most brutal offramp features 2 lanes merging right (me included), directly into 2 lanes entering the highway - i.e., merging left. It's a mess.

Today I was able to quickly get ahead of an entire fleet to my right, by QUICKLY speeding ahead of the whole lot of them, & then cutting over into totally open lanes. I've never driven a car with such instant acceleration, and in this situation, acceleration = safety.

Parking. The LA area features many legacy parking lots with old, narrow spaces. The Polestar is only 71 inches wide. That's 2 inches narrower than a Model 3, a Volvo XC 40 or even a BMW Z4 (a tiny convertible).

So I spend zero time stressing about "will I squeeze into that parking space." The P2 just fits.

100+ mile trips. I started a 120-mile trip with 70% charge. This trip was almost entirely on highways. When I laid in my destination, Google Maps told me I wouldn't make it - that I would have 0% charge upon completion. (Perhaps because up to this point, I had been city-driving the P2 quite aggressively.)

So I set the autopilot and drove at 65 MPH for the entire trip. I noticed that I started to gain charge on the Google Maps estimate every 10 miles or so.

I finished the trip with 20% charge to spare. I had used 50% of my battery to cover 120 miles, yielding an effective range of 240 miles.

Baby the car, and you will alleviate range anxiety substantially.
 

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I finished the trip with 20% charge to spare. I had used 50% of my battery to cover 120 miles, yielding an effective range of 240 miles.
It is funny how much Google expects you drive like a loon, and if you don't how much % you can claw back with reasonable speeds/conditions.
 

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This forum has been very helpful to me, so I thought I'd offer a few practical, daily-driver observations. I've had the car for 20 days and put 600 miles on it.

So here's how the P2 handles 3 common everyday situations: highway merging, parking, and 100+ mile

100+ mile trips. I started a 120-mile trip with 70% charge. This trip was almost entirely on highways. When I laid in my destination, Google Maps told me I wouldn't make it - that I would have 0% charge upon completion. (Perhaps because up to this point, I had been city-driving the P2 quite aggressively.)
100+ mile trips. I started a 120-mile trip with 70% charge. This trip was almost entirely on highways. When I laid in my destination, Google Maps told me I wouldn't make it - that I would have 0% charge upon completion. (Perhaps because up to this point, I had been city-driving the P2 quite aggressively.)

So I set the autopilot and drove at 65 MPH for the entire trip. I noticed that I started to gain charge on the Google Maps estimate every 10 miles or so.

I finished the trip with 20% charge to spare. I had used 50% of my battery to cover 120 miles, yielding an effective range of 240 miles.

Baby the car, and you will alleviate range anxiety substantially.
I am interested to know under which circumstances you made this trip (especialy temperature / weather)
 

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Parking. The LA area features many legacy parking lots with old, narrow spaces. The Polestar is only 71 inches wide. That's 2 inches narrower than a Model 3, a Volvo XC 40 or even a BMW Z4 (a tiny convertible).

So I spend zero time stressing about "will I squeeze into that parking space." The P2 just fits.
According to the manual the car is 73.2" minus the mirrors. My old car was ~71" minus the mirrors, and the P2 is definitely wider. We have the same space size issue down here in San Diego, but probably not as big an issue finding spaces in general. I've gotten used to parking in the boonies.

Interestingly, on the P2 site it says the car is 1.95m wide (~76") but the manual says 1.98m (~78").
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
According to the manual the car is 73.2" minus the mirrors. My old car was ~71" minus the mirrors, and the P2 is definitely wider. We have the same space size issue down here in San Diego, but probably not as big an issue finding spaces in general. I've gotten used to parking in the boonies.

Interestingly, on the P2 site it says the car is 1.95m wide (~76") but the manual says 1.98m (~78").
You're right Joel - I stand corrected. (Never trust Google!). I actually got out a tape measure and the Polestar is 73" at its widest point, which are its front haunches/wheelwells
 

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You're right Joel - I stand corrected. (Never trust Google!). I actually got out a tape measure and the Polestar is 73" at its widest point, which are its front haunches/wheelwells
Ha, you say that but you drive around with Google all day now! 🤣

I saw a bunch of stuff that said it was 71" too when I was researching the car, which I thought was weird. Eventually found the specs in the manual.
 

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P.S. I'm glad you used "haunches." My wife looked at me like I had 3 heads when I used that word describing the car.
 

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That's interesting - so you measured the front haunches to be wider than the back? Looking at the car, I'd thought it was wider at the back, wider in fact than the front with the wing mirrors closed! (But I'm probably wrong, I realise this.)
 

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Here are the listed dimensions from the UK press guide. I agree the rear haunches look wider than the front, but overall within a few mm it seems things are symmetric front to back, given the haunches are in line with where the wheels end and the front/rear track are about the same.
 

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This forum has been very helpful to me, so I thought I'd offer a few practical, daily-driver observations. I've had the car for 20 days and put 600 miles on it.

So here's how the P2 handles 3 common everyday situations: highway merging, parking, and 100+ mile trips.

Highway merging: I live in LA and regularly use 3 different highways. My most brutal offramp features 2 lanes merging right (me included), directly into 2 lanes entering the highway - i.e., merging left. It's a mess.

Today I was able to quickly get ahead of an entire fleet to my right, by QUICKLY speeding ahead of the whole lot of them, & then cutting over into totally open lanes. I've never driven a car with such instant acceleration, and in this situation, acceleration = safety.

Parking. The LA area features many legacy parking lots with old, narrow spaces. The Polestar is only 71 inches wide. That's 2 inches narrower than a Model 3, a Volvo XC 40 or even a BMW Z4 (a tiny convertible).

So I spend zero time stressing about "will I squeeze into that parking space." The P2 just fits.

100+ mile trips. I started a 120-mile trip with 70% charge. This trip was almost entirely on highways. When I laid in my destination, Google Maps told me I wouldn't make it - that I would have 0% charge upon completion. (Perhaps because up to this point, I had been city-driving the P2 quite aggressively.)

So I set the autopilot and drove at 65 MPH for the entire trip. I noticed that I started to gain charge on the Google Maps estimate every 10 miles or so.

I finished the trip with 20% charge to spare. I had used 50% of my battery to cover 120 miles, yielding an effective range of 240 miles.

Baby the car, and you will alleviate range anxiety substantially.
as a check, I calculated my range for just the relatively flat highway legs of my trip last weekend. In each case the weather was 50-60sF/10-18C. Going there I used 59% to go 125mi. Coming back I used 57% to go 121mi. I generally drove 70-80mph as traffic allowed. So 210-215mi mostly highway range.
If the weather was in the 70sF or if I had less of a lead foot I could easily see getting the range @fence Pole stated
 

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I'm not sure a lead foot is that damaging to range. You're getting to the same kinetic energy whether you accelerate slowly or not. I can see how an ICE is less efficient with fast acceleration, but, unless a BEV motor is much less efficient when pushed, it shouldn't matter at all!

Hmmmmm.
 

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I'm not sure a lead foot is that damaging to range. You're getting to the same kinetic energy whether you accelerate slowly or not. I can see how an ICE is less efficient with fast acceleration, but, unless a BEV motor is much less efficient when pushed, it shouldn't matter at all!

Hmmmmm.
Acceleration, no, but speed yes. Drag increases with the square of velocity, so I would expect somewhat lower range driving at 80mph vs 65mph.
 

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It is affected by acceleration but only a bit. Your total energy usage, i.e. the area under the curve of energy vs. time, is higher because you get to your speed more quickly and therefore the average is higher. It's certainly nowhere near as much of an effect as changing the top speed though, unless you're driving around Milton Keynes or Slough, and can only drive 1/4 mile before getting to another roundabout...
 

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I'm not sure a lead foot is that damaging to range. You're getting to the same kinetic energy whether you accelerate slowly or not. I can see how an ICE is less efficient with fast acceleration, but, unless a BEV motor is much less efficient when pushed, it shouldn't matter at all!

Hmmmmm.
A heavy and powerful car like Polestar pushes a lot of amps through the system to get a big acceleration number. Heat loss is directly proportional to the square of current flowing. Hence, it is more efficient to get to the same speed gently.
 

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A heavy and powerful car like Polestar pushes a lot of amps through the system to get a big acceleration number. Heat loss is directly proportional to the square of current flowing. Hence, it is more efficient to get to the same speed gently.
... and I was probably going with inefficient profiles for both acceleration and speed...
 

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... and I was probably going with inefficient profiles for both acceleration and speed...
Take it from someone who drives (in the city) like a person three times their age, our cars are way more efficient with low speeds and gentler accelerations. Speaking from experience now [finally]!
 

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A heavy and powerful car like Polestar pushes a lot of amps through the system to get a big acceleration number. Heat loss is directly proportional to the square of current flowing. Hence, it is more efficient to get to the same speed gently.
Yes... but the same amount of work is being done. Is this change in heat loss significant?

Here's an article where a guy tried to test it, but he did his runs on different days, so I'm not sure we can trust his results. He found hard acceleration did hurt.


Here's a physics discussion. Two points of view and no clear conclusion except that it's far worse to accelerate hard in an ICE vehicle.


Another guy comes to the same conclusion... It's a bit less efficient in BEVs, but small compared to ICE vehicles.

 
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