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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm picking up from comments and reviews that even on the standard suspension and 19" wheels, the Polestar's quite a hard ride. With the performance pack, can the Öhlins be adjusted to give a more gentle ride with the 20" wheels than the standard springs on 19"s, or even at the highest setting is it still a firmer ride?

In other words, how can I get the softest ride - PP+20" or non-PP+19"?

Thanks,

Neil
 

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I'm picking up from comments and reviews that even on the standard suspension and 19" wheels, the Polestar's quite a hard ride. With the performance pack, can the Öhlins be adjusted to give a more gentle ride with the 20" wheels than the standard springs on 19"s, or even at the highest setting is it still a firmer ride?

In other words, how can I get the softest ride - PP+20" or non-PP+19"?

Thanks,

Neil
My understanding is the PP set to softest setting gives the comfiest ride. One of the US reviews, Kyle Connor, seemed to indicate that.

However we have not had back to back tests of the different specs being driven on a similar course by the same driver in order to best test this. Until we have internal normalization of derriere sensitivity, that's the best I could estimate.

That said I think the nonPP 19" firmness is fine. I just am a bit more careful compared to my prior car (a very squishily suspended Camry) on less-well-maintained roads when I have my family in the car. And for that reason I basically don't use PilotAssist at all because PilotAssist doesn't do the modulations necessary to maintain a more comfortable ride around road imperfections.
When it's just me in the car I let it rip and only worry when I suspect flashing lights are around.
 

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My understanding is the PP set to softest setting gives the comfiest ride. One of the US reviews, Kyle Connor, seemed to indicate that.

However we have not had back to back tests of the different specs being driven on a similar course by the same driver in order to best test this. Until we have internal normalization of derriere sensitivity, that's the best I could estimate.

That said I think the nonPP 19" firmness is fine. I just am a bit more careful compared to my prior car (a very squishily suspended Camry) on less-well-maintained roads when I have my family in the car. And for that reason I basically don't use PilotAssist at all because PilotAssist doesn't do the modulations necessary to maintain a more comfortable ride around road imperfections.
When it's just me in the car I let it rip and only worry when I suspect flashing lights are around.
This echoes what I've heard/read. The PP in its "base" config is stiffer, but it can be adjusted to be softer than the non-PP. The PP does have thinner sidewalls and, it appears, a slightly stiffer spring rate, so it may be a bit rougher over nasty pavement no matter what you do... that said, the Ohlins do a good job of smoothing out the little stuff.

Any P*2 owners, PP and non-PP, who live close to one another want to do some test driving with an accelerometer app?

[Edit] those typos drove me nuts
 

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Anyone P*2 owners, PP and non-PP, who live close to one another want to do some test driving with an accelerometer app?
I can offer up a 19" nonPP in the Bay Area for this! I certainly know some broken roads that could give a good test
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Any P*2 owners, PP and non-PP, who live close to one another want to do some test driving with an accelerometer app?
The results of that will only be meaningful for whatever settings the PP owner's got his dampers set to though, though it would be an interesting comparison with the 18/20 recommended 'comfort' settings
 

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The results of that will only be meaningful for whatever settings the PP owner's got his dampers set to though, though it would be an interesting comparison with the 18/20 recommended 'comfort' settings
Goal would be to test the PP at the three recommended settings along side the non-PP as a benchmark.
 

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I have the PP and adjusted my dampers from the as-delivered 6 all around to 9 all around. I was surprised by what a huge difference that made. I like it at 9 so haven't yet tried other settings.
 

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Dropped my PP for service today and got a non-PP 19" as a loaner. I was the first loaner for the Marin Polestar location and got a brand new Thunder 19" vegan with 83 miles on it. Thunder looks great btw, but I'll keep my midnight thank you very much.

tldr; I believe the suspension on the PP is significantly better.

I drove 35 mins on smooth highways, crap highways, and crap city streets returning to my house on a route I drive often (and just did dropping off the car). I found the non-PP was far less confident on high speed turns on the highway, and the suspension "bounces" a lot more (takes more time to settle).

To be fair, I do think the 19" absorbs really big bumps and potholes slightly better (maybe by 10%). I will add that the PP has a very slight "booming" suspension sound (my wife can't hear it, but I'm OCD) over bigger bumps, I'm 99% sure coming from the tire/wheel combo. For smaller bumps and general road irregularities, I believe the PP suspension handles it significantly better and offers a smoother ride.

For me this settled any doubts I had on getting mine with the PP. My PP is on the factory delivered setting and I haven't messed with it since it has always felt good to me. Since I haven't messed with it, I have no way to know what it actually is set since the only way you know is to reset by turning the knob until it stops and then counting clicks when you are setting.

Also, I noticed the vegan seats in the loaner feel less plush on my bum than my leather seats, like there is less padding in them or something, so again prefer the leather here.

I realize bias could be working it's way in here, but I tried to deliberately score these factors fairly as I always had a tiny bit of buyers remorse on the expensive upgrades.
 

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I will add that the PP has a very slight "booming" suspension sound (my wife can't hear it, but I'm OCD) over bigger bumps, I'm 99% sure coming from the tire/wheel combo. For smaller bumps and general road irregularities, I believe the PP suspension handles it significantly better and offers a smoother ride.
I also have whatever the default setting happened to be. I think I detect the same “booming” you refer to. It bothers me a tad. I've been curious if a slightly softer setting will reduce it, or if it'll just come down to getting different tires some day.
 

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Dropped my PP for service today and got a non-PP 19" as a loaner. I was the first loaner for the Marin Polestar location and got a brand new Thunder 19" vegan with 83 miles on it. Thunder looks great btw, but I'll keep my midnight thank you very much.

tldr; I believe the suspension on the PP is significantly better.

I drove 35 mins on smooth highways, crap highways, and crap city streets returning to my house on a route I drive often (and just did dropping off the car). I found the non-PP was far less confident on high speed turns on the highway, and the suspension "bounces" a lot more (takes more time to settle).

To be fair, I do think the 19" absorbs really big bumps and potholes slightly better (maybe by 10%). I will add that the PP has a very slight "booming" suspension sound (my wife can't hear it, but I'm OCD) over bigger bumps, I'm 99% sure coming from the tire/wheel combo. For smaller bumps and general road irregularities, I believe the PP suspension handles it significantly better and offers a smoother ride.

For me this settled any doubts I had on getting mine with the PP. My PP is on the factory delivered setting and I haven't messed with it since it has always felt good to me. Since I haven't messed with it, I have no way to know what it actually is set since the only way you know is to reset by turning the knob until it stops and then counting clicks when you are setting.

Also, I noticed the vegan seats in the loaner feel less plush on my bum than my leather seats, like there is less padding in them or something, so again prefer the leather here.

I realize bias could be working it's way in here, but I tried to deliberately score these factors fairly as I always had a tiny bit of buyers remorse on the expensive upgrades.
But the faster acceleration on non-PP blew your mind right ?
 

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2021 Polestar 2 - Snow, Charcoal, non-PP - VIN: 006XXX
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I wonder if it would possible to buy the Öhlins and have them installed on the non PP with 19"
 

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I can't see why not - they should be a straight bolt in replacement. You know the springs are different as well? And they are phenomenally expensive. Would probably cost you more to buy the springs and dampers than the entire PP upgrade would have cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Dropped my PP for service today and got a non-PP 19" as a loaner. I was the first loaner for the Marin Polestar location and got a brand new Thunder 19" vegan with 83 miles on it. Thunder looks great btw, but I'll keep my midnight thank you very much.

tldr; I believe the suspension on the PP is significantly better.
Really useful, thanks.

Got to get my head round whether it's worth the extra £5000 though for a softer ride, and the negatives (reduced range, harder riding tyres, more chance or kerbing alloys). It's so frustrating not even being able to test drive one.
 

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I can't see why not - they should be a straight bolt in replacement. You know the springs are different as well? And they are phenomenally expensive. Would probably cost you more to buy the springs and dampers than the entire PP upgrade would have cost.
Seems the swaybars are different too.

You could just replace the shocks and leave the rest, but that's a lot of money for a marginally more plush ride, plus the car's handling would suffer.
 

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Got to get my head round whether it's worth the extra £5000 though for a softer ride, and the negatives (reduced range, harder riding tyres, more chance or kerbing alloys). It's so frustrating not even being able to test drive one.

I've posted this before, but here are some numbers that may be helpful:

Ohlins dampers would cost you about $4000. I figure the net benefit to you is about $3000. (New cost minus value of standard fittings.)
The forged alloy wheels cost about $4000 again. I figure the net benefit is about $2000.
Brembo brakes, about $3500. Net benefit? $2500?

So the value of the PP is about $7500. It's a pretty good deal, I think.

P.S. If you tried to change things over later, the installation costs would probably be another $2500.
 
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I've posted this before, but here are some numbers that may be helpful:

Ohlins dampers would cost you about $4000. I figure the net benefit to you is about $3000. (New cost minus value of standard fittings.)
The forged alloy wheels cost about $4000 again. I figure the net benefit is about $2000.
Brembo brakes, about $3500. Net benefit? $2500?

So the value of the PP is about $7500. It's a pretty good deal, I think.

P.S. If you tried to change things over later, the installation costs would probably be another $2500.
Don't forget the springs, swaybars, and all the yellow stuff!
 
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