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Which would render the problem obsolete ;)
I actually had a scare in the rain back in 1991 when ABS was very new and not widely available. A guy stuck his nose out of a driveway as I was barrelling down. I hit the brakes and just figured I'd skid into him. At the last moment I turned into the same driveway fully under control and wound up parallel to this guy. He got out of his car thanking me profusely for not T-boning him and wondering how I managed to be able to do that. At that last moment I remembered this new feature called ABS that I had. :D
 

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Please forgive me if this has been covered elsewhere....
Is the touch screen the only way to switch regen off/on? I use a more basic version on my VW which is activated by tapping the auto gear stick down. I switch very often on every journey. I use it to slow down when approaching a corner or roundabout then switch it off for improved fuel efficiency (and I'm lazy & don't like moving my feet).
 

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I think that's the only way. The only other way may be to push the 'gear' selector again while driving. I am fairly sure this will not do it but will try it to see.
 

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Please forgive me if this has been covered elsewhere....
Is the touch screen the only way to switch regen off/on? I use a more basic version on my VW which is activated by tapping the auto gear stick down. I switch very often on every journey. I use it to slow down when approaching a corner or roundabout then switch it off for improved fuel efficiency (and I'm lazy & don't like moving my feet).
I believe yes. On my test drive I tried asking Google to do so and that didn't work and nothing else clearly presented itself.

If you don't mind a bit of ankle motion, Standard OPD works great though!
 

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Please forgive me if this has been covered elsewhere....
Is the touch screen the only way to switch regen off/on? I use a more basic version on my VW which is activated by tapping the auto gear stick down. I switch very often on every journey. I use it to slow down when approaching a corner or roundabout then switch it off for improved fuel efficiency (and I'm lazy & don't like moving my feet).
To best of my knowledge there isn't another way. However, you can't actually turn regen off, one pedal driving you can but even then, brakes applied cause regen to happen. Physical brakes only kick in and help if you press them hard enough. So unless I'm doing a bunch of city driving I just leave one pedal driving off so coasting is always an option
 

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I think that's the only way. The only other way may be to push the 'gear' selector again while driving. I am fairly sure this will not do it but will try it to see.
I wil be interested to hear if pushing the gear selector down performs any kind of function. What does it do on a Volvo?
 

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The concept of using the gear shift I believe was meant to give new EV drivers the sense of a low gear like in an ICE car. But since Tesla has now defined EV operation, that's been replaced with the OPD concept. Heck, the entire concept of a gear shift lever is a holdover too.
 

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I think that's the only way. The only other way may be to push the 'gear' selector again while driving. I am fairly sure this will not do it but will try it to see.
Pushing would put the car in N/R. Pretty sure pulling doesnt help either.

Just want to remind everyone Regen != OPD. The car also regens when braking.
 

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Remind me what the symbol != means, please.
 

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Sorry, not equal.

BTW, it seems the car uses the hydraulic brakes right after the start. Maybe to clean the brakes?
 

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BTW, it seems the car uses the hydraulic brakes right after the start. Maybe to clean the brakes?
That would make sense. Some exercise would be necessary to keep the brakes from freezing up and to clean the rotors.
 

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As this forum expands, it is getting hard to keep track of everything. So apologies if this has been asked and answered elsewhere.

Question: Does the P2 Electronic Stability Control system (ESC) make use of (or activate during) regenerative braking, or only the traditional disc brakes? I don't see how the regenerative breaking could be applied to a single wheel, which is required for effective ESC.

A separate, but related, question is: Does regenerative braking have any anti-skid (by which I mean anti-slip) functionality? Seems like the ideal situation would be for regenerative braking to pivot to traditional braking (with ESC) once slipping wheel is detected anywhere.

Obviously, this all ties directly into other discussions about the effect of regenerative braking in slippery conditions. I'd appreciate any insight folks may have on this. FWIW, my Audi A4 Quattro is unbelievably good in handling any unusual situations on slippery roads. I'll do everything in my power to get the A4 cattywampus on slick snowy roads, and it more-or-less refuses to go sideways. Hoping (but not necessarily expecting) for similar stability control in the P2.
 

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Working regen differently on each axle should be easy. Making each wheel on an axle can be implemented through different braking left and right. At least that's what I understand.
 

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I read something yesterday in the owners manual that indicates stability control will activate during regen. Finding it again in the manual is another story :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #39
An article reports this :
"The engineers employed brake-based torque vectoring to send power to the outside wheel, which is nice."

Which leads me to believe all wheels are real-time monitored and power/braking is adjusted accordingly in all situations (slip / skid).
 

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From the manual:

Stability control
This function helps control the driving and braking force of each individual wheel in an attempt to stabilize the vehicle.
Spin control and active yaw control
This function is active at low speeds and brakes the wheels that are spinning to transfer additional power to wheels that are not spinning.
This function can also help prevent the wheels from spinning while the vehicle is accelerating.
Engine drag control
Engine drag control (EDC) can help prevent inadvertent wheel lock, e.g. after downshifting or using engine braking when driving at low speeds on a slippery surface.
Inadvertent wheel lock while driving could impair the driver's ability to steer the vehicle.
 
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