Polestar Forum banner
41 - 60 of 123 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Disagree. That use to be the case.

There are three things that have, and will continue to change this equation:

(1) With a $120 adapter (to fit the Tesla plug), I’ve read that anybody can use a tesla charging station in the US. As of the end of 2021, there were 1,200 Telsa charging stations in the US, though the number of stalls at each station varies widely.

(2) Charge Point has, in fact, the most charging stations in the US, although I have no idea what % are “fast charging” stations (I don’t know The numbers?. ChargePoint is the largest electric vehicle charging network in the United States, with over 30,000charging stations, as of Feb 23, 2022

(3) EA currently operates about 800 charging stations in the US, housing about 3,500 individual chargers with speeds ranging from 150 to 350 kW. Additionally, the company has already shared plans to double its charging network in the US and Canada by 2026, expanding to about 10,000 chargers across 1,800 stations.

IMO, I think the days of Tesla dominance in the EV sector are rapidly changing, and as such, I would not base any long term buying decision, regarding which EV I would buy, based on the historical availability of charging stations. For me, anyway, that would be a non-factor given the rapidly changing EV landscape.
It's not just about the charging network. They have longer range and charge at faster/higher rates. Charging availability for the rest of us though is definitely turning the corner. Here in Texas the amount of chargers is going to explode over the next year. Currently there is only one fast charge station between where I live Austin and Dallas and same for Houston. The state is adding several more along those routes very soon. Also the gas station chain Buc ee's(think huge super nice truck stop but only for cars) is adding fast charging at all their locations across the state.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
It's not just about the charging network.
Longer range, for the most part, is accomplished with a bigger battery in the Tesla, and I suspect, lower air drag coefficient on the Tesla. While personal taste, one of the things i like about the P2, vis a vi the Tesla 3, is the P2 looks like a conventional sedan, whilst the Tesla has that Jestsonian look, That post Prius tear-drop look, which I suspect, is more aerodynamically efficient compared to the P2.

But my previous comment was specifically (as I quoted) focused on the comment where you said, ”the tesla supercharging network is a big plus”

I still stand by what I said: that is rapidly changing, and IMO, less of a factor today, than it was just a few years ago, and will be even less Of a factor in another two years.

As far as “speed”…well, that’s very “stall” dependent.…and have not seen verifiable data from an independent 3rd party regarding the number if stalls, at each speed, from each supplier? Those numbers seems to be a very loose/nebulous, and as far as anything Musk/Tesla claims…I do not believe one word from that huckster. Not a single word. He’s been caught far too many times in a lie, or gross exaggeration, to believe anything he says, at this point.

But something that doesn’t get mentioned much, except on YouTube where very angry Tesla owners show videos of huge lines of waiting Tesla owners who want to charge their cars….sometimes waiting for hours. Granted, those lines may not happen where you live, or where I live, but it does happen where teslas are very prevalent, for example, in California. So, one could throw that “time/speed“ element into the overall charging equation, should one be so unfortunate to experience such long waits? So far, knock on wood, I’ve never had to wait a second at any Electrify America stations I have been to.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I was originally in the market for a Model 3 Performance, but sitting in my friends, I just didn't like the over simplistic cabin, the seats, or the fact that most things are controlled by that big giant screen. Fit and finish was another issue, and lastly, there was a 6 month wait. Don't get me wrong, the M3 has a better drivetrain and battery pack and battery management, but once I was able to get a test drive and up close view of the P2 DM, I was sold.

The other thing I'm not a fan of is Elon's "I know what's best for you" philosophy. It's the same reason I prefer the OnePlus over the iPhone...I don't want anyone locking me into an ecosystem I have no control over
These could be my words also.
 

·
Registered
2022 PoleStar 2 - Dual Motors - Void
Joined
·
399 Posts
Longer range, for the most part, is accomplished with a bigger battery in the Tesla, and I suspect, better air drag coefficient on the Tesla.

But my previous comment was specifically (as I quoted) focused on the comment where you said, ”the tesla supercharging network is a big plus”

I still stand by what I said: that is rapidly changing, and IMO, less of a factor today, than it was just a few years ago, and will be even less Of a factor in another two years.

As far as “speed”…well, that’s very “stall” dependent.…and have not seen verifiable data from an independent 3rd party regarding the number if stalls, at each speed, from each supplier? Those numbers seems to be a very loose/nebulous, and as far as anything Musk/Tesla claims…I do not believe one word from that huckster. Not a single word. He’s been caught far too many times in a lie, or gross exaggeration, to believe anything he says, at this point.

But something that doesn’t get mentioned much, except on YouTube where very angry Tesla owners show videos of huge lines of waiting Tesla owners who want to charge their cars….sometimes waiting for hours. Granted, those lines may not happen where you live, or where I live, but it does happen where teslas are very prevalent, for example, in California. So, one could throw that “time/speed“ element into the overall charging equation, should one be so unfortunate to experience such long waits? So far, knock on wood, I’ve never had to wait a second at any Electrify America stations I have been to.
As far the statement I bolded, it's not about "rapid charging", but availability of rapid chargers. I'm not sure where you live or if you ever mentioned it, Tesla has a HUGE advantage in the availability of working fast chargers. I live in Northern Cal, and when I have rarely had to visit an EA, there will be only 4 EA superchargers in most locations, and the there will be like 20 Tesla superchargers. When I travel it's even more skewed....when traveling between NorCal and SoCal, there is one EA in Coalinga I stop where there are only 6 EA chargers (which in most cases at least 2 are offline), and there are at least 30 Tesla chargers. In this same location, Tesla is building out over 100 superchargers. In my last trip I had to wait for a charger in 3 different EA locations to become available, and Tesla drivers had no issues getting an available charger.

Next point...working chargers. Between NorCal and SoCal, half the EA chargers are offline. It's the same case in SoCal itself, at least in the area where I travel to. That means usually out of four superchargers, only two are usually available. This was consistent three different trips I made. Talking to my friends and co-workers that own Teslas...most superchargers are working and rarely offline.

Last point...size of the chargers. The V2 and V3 Tesla chargers are tiny in comparison to the humongous EA chargers. So you can put a ton of them in a small area. And Tesla is constantly adding new chargers. I haven't seen any expansion yet of the EA charging network. None at all. I've reported multiple times problems with chargers in key travel areas, yet the same EA chargers are always offline.

Tesla has invested and built out their charging network over the last 10 years with a lot of thought put into it, including the ease of charging...with even a better designed connector. CCS is a joke created by committee of bumbling bureaucrats. If we are to give credit for anything Tesla, we have to acknowledge the thought and foresight they put into their charging network, while EA looks like it has no idea what it's doing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,489 Posts
and charge at faster/higher rates.
In principle yes. But my anecdata indicates that supposed advantage is overplayed.

The few times I've Turo-ed a Tesla, and had to fast charge it up to a threshold % before returning it, I ran into issues of slow charging rates that significantly extended the charging time.

In the Bay Area, a few mi from Tesla's (former) HQ, at a ~1/2 full Supercharger, in a Model Y I got max 50-60kW at SOC% that in my Polestar I would see >100kW. Ended up texting the Turo owner if I could get it to a lower minimum since I was coming up to the time we agreed for handover and offered to pay the difference - they kindly let me go.

In the DMV, in a Model X I got max 70kW at a near full SuperCharger. I tried to specify the nav to get me to the fastest kW charger around but couldn't. In that case I just stayed there 20 min longer than I anticipated initially.

In each case, the battery was preconditioned (Polestar needs to implement a notification about that status like Tesla has) and it was a regular weekend day - not a notable higher-travel holiday.

Overall, across fast charging sessions in either, I've gotten much faster average kW in my Polestars on the CCS network than in different Teslas on the SuperCharger network. That was honestly surprising to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I'd rate the Model 3 as a far superior technical achievement and with high gadget factor from sentry mode to cough autopilot, summon, app availability, battery management, efficiency and more.

But...

I wanted a car. You know, to drive...safely. Having a dash console with speedo in front of me helps. So do normal buttons and switches - they require no thinking or taking eyes off the road. If I want to turn on the lights or wipers I don't have to look at a screen or hunt around. Same goes for just about all the major controls except climate. Seats are very comfortable, interior fit and finish is excellent, it's very quiet inside and the car handles quite well. My efficiency stats are normally far higher than ratings and reviews and slap on the tax credit we get in the states and it was a much easier decision that I thought it would be. One month later, I couldn't be happier with my decision.
Carsly, which packs did you put on?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
The few times I've Turo-ed a Tesla, and had to fast charge it up to a threshold % before returning it, I ran into issues of slow charging rates that significantly extended the charging time.

...

Overall, across fast charging sessions in either, I've gotten much faster average kW in my Polestars on the CCS network than in different Teslas on the SuperCharger network. That was honestly surprising to me.
Teslas need a much higher battery temperature to get the optimal charging so even in the summer I need need to precondition to get the optimal charge curve, it needs to be around 55 degrees C. Since I am usually too lazy to use public AC charging I do some DC charging now and then on my way home from errands and for that the Polestar 2 will most likely charge faster than my Model 3 does due to the battery not reaching the optimal temperature in the 15-20 minutes I have to precondition.

And I have the US made one that has a faster charging battery pack when at optimal temperature, nowadays we get the LG battery in Europe with the Model 3. That battery is as fast as the Polestar 2 at charging 10-80% when under optimal conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
As far the statement I bolded, it's not about "rapid charging", but availability of rapid chargers. I'm not sure where you live or if you ever mentioned it, Tesla has a HUGE advantage in the availability of working fast chargers. I live in Northern Cal, and when I have rarely had to visit an EA, there will be only 4 EA superchargers in most locations, and the there will be like 20 Tesla superchargers. When I travel it's even more skewed....when traveling between NorCal and SoCal, there is one EA in Coalinga I stop where there are only 6 EA chargers (which in most cases at least 2 are offline), and there are at least 30 Tesla chargers. In this same location, Tesla is building out over 100 superchargers. In my last trip I had to wait for a charger in 3 different EA locations to become available, and Tesla drivers had no issues getting an available charger.

Next point...working chargers. Between NorCal and SoCal, half the EA chargers are offline. It's the same case in SoCal itself, at least in the area where I travel to. That means usually out of four superchargers, only two are usually available. This was consistent three different trips I made. Talking to my friends and co-workers that own Teslas...most superchargers are working and rarely offline.

Last point...size of the chargers. The V2 and V3 Tesla chargers are tiny in comparison to the humongous EA chargers. So you can put a ton of them in a small area. And Tesla is constantly adding new chargers. I haven't seen any expansion yet of the EA charging network. None at all. I've reported multiple times problems with chargers in key travel areas, yet the same EA chargers are always offline.

Tesla has invested and built out their charging network over the last 10 years with a lot of thought put into it, including the ease of charging...with even a better designed connector. CCS is a joke created by committee of bumbling bureaucrats. If we are to give credit for anything Tesla, we have to acknowledge the thought and foresight they put into their charging network, while EA looks like it has no idea what it's doing

Glad ur happy. 👍 But doesn’t change my position.

According to tesla’s own PR, you can get “up to” 200 miles of range from the Tesla fast charger in 15 minutes. That’s essentially about 1/2 the time to get that from a EA fast charger. OK, so I save 15 minutes in charging time, for my trip between DC and Boston, from using a Tesla Super Charger. For me, anyway, that’s insignificant.…especially since I spend at least 30 minutes on any trip I make to Boston to go to the bathroom and get a bite to eat. For some, yes, saving 15 minutes on a ~ 7 hour trip might be critical? Not for me.

I might add, that when most people speak of “range anxiety” (the #1 concern for most EV buyers) ….they are not referring to how fast you can recharge (although that can be important), but just about having the ability to recharge, at all. So, the # of available charging stalls is, for many, a more critical factor than charging speed, which, is highly dependent on temperature and state of charge of the cars battery, etc. I wonder if the Tesla fast chargers has contributed, directly, or indirectly, to the number of fires from Tesla batteries? Don’t know? But I do know that Porsche recently went to 800v, to get faster speeds, and was told that has contributed to a number of porsche customers reporting melted plugs due to excessive heat build up while charging. Faster doesn’t always mean better.

Your experiences and observations are not my experiences or observations. Trading antidotal stories is a lost cause, so I’ll let it go with that. As far as the overall, nationwide (numbers) availability of charging “stalls/stations”, combining both EA and Charge Point numbers, they rival, if not exceed Teslas. The point being - while Tesla was certainly first to the game, the newcomers are now building out at a faster rate than Tesla. As more and more non-Teslas come into the market, I expect this trend will continue…which is why Tesla recognizes this and started it’s “pilot program”, and begun opening up their super-charging stations to all (at least in Europe, and probably, in the US, very soon). But for now, and at least in the US, if I need a charge, and can’t find a EA stall, I most certainly will use my tesla-to-J1772 adapter, to do so. In time, as I’m sure Musk sees the financial incentive to open up his “super-charging” stations to all….it will happen here in the US. Just a matter of when, not if. I have no doubt about that. So, while the number of Tesla super charging stations may be an attractive incentive for some, it definitely is not for me. But I don’t expect you, or everyone else to have the same opinion, or experiences as I do. More or less, the market will ultimately determine access to energy, and what people will pay. Competition is good, although the less money I give Musk, the better i feel.


FYI - Born in SD. Grew up in Coronado (if you know where that is?), went to undergrad at Cal, worked at LL and LBL for a few years.…and visit Ca a lot to visit my parents. I am, if there is such a thing, a California native.
 

·
Registered
2022 PoleStar 2 - Dual Motors - Void
Joined
·
399 Posts
Glad ur happy. 👍 But doesn’t change my position.

According to tesla’s own PR, you can get “up to” 200 miles of range from the Tesla fast charger in 15 minutes. That’s essentially about 1/2 the time to get that from a EA fast charger. OK, so I save 15 minutes in charging time, for my trip between DC and Boston, from using a Tesla Super Charger. For me, anyway, that’s insignificant.…especially since I spend at least 30 minutes on any trip I make to Boston to go to the bathroom and get a bite to eat. For some, yes, saving 15 minutes on a ~ 7 hour trip might be critical? Not for me.

Your experiences and observations are not my experiences or observations. Trading antidotal stories is a lost cause, so I’ll let it go with that. As far as the overall, nationwide (numbers) availability of charging “stalls/stations”, combining both EA and Charge Point numbers, they rival, if not exceed Teslas. The point being - while Tesla was certainly first to the game, the newcomers are now building out at a faster rate than Tesla. As more and more non-Teslas come into the market, I expect this trend will continue…which is why Tesla recognizes this and started it’s “pilot program”, and begun opening up their super-charging stations to all (at least in Europe, and probably, in the US, very soon). But for now, and at least in the US, if I need a charge, and can’t find a EA stall, I most certainly will use my tesla-to-J1772 adapter, to do so. In time, as I’m sure Musk sees the financial incentive to open up his “super-charging” stations to all….it will happen here in the US. Just a matter of when, not if. I have no doubt about that. So, while the number of Tesla super charging stations may be an attractive incentive for some, it definitely is not for me. But I don’t expect you, or everyone else to have the same opinion, or experiences as I do. More or less, the market will ultimately determine access to energy, and what people will pay. Competition is good, although the less money I give Musk, the better i feel.


FYI - Born in SD. Grew up in Coronado (if you know where that is?), went to undergrad at Cal, worked at LL and LBL for a few years.…and visit Ca a lot to visit my parents.
Not trying to change your position, just giving you my observations. ChargePoint here sucks even worse than EA. Personally if I had to do more than 4 trips a year to SoCal, I would have definitely gone with a Tesla.

Is that Coronado Island in San Diego? If so, very beautiful city. If you are ever in the Silicon Valley area, drop me a line!
 

·
Registered
'22 PS2 LR Pilot/Plus
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi folks
I’m torn between the M3LR and the Polestar DLR. I prefer the design of the Polestar but like the tech of the Tesla.

What’s your feedback on the Polestar DLR how did you find the difference between both vehicles prior to deciding on the Polestar etc
I have both a Tesla Model 3 Dual Motor and a Polestar LR (my wife primarily drives the Tesla, but I've driven it enough to provide some comparisons). I think they are both great cars, but here are some thoughts on our experiences with both of them.

Both are incredibly fun to drive, especially if you're coming from an gas engine car. The Tesla doesn't require as much driver interaction in my opinion and is pretty easy to drive. It is also faster going from 0-60, although not by much (4.2 vs. 4.5 seconds). In my opinion, the PS handles better and you feel like you're more in control with steering and cornering.

Range - although the Tesla has the higher range, both vehicles fall short of the "expected range" they advertise. I've generally found the range to be about 15% less than advertised on both vehicles, but that's perhaps because I drive slightly more aggressively than the average tester. This is not to say that I drive recklessly by any means, but why get a car that can go that fast without ever putting it to the test or taking advantage of it when passing other vehicles on the highway?

Charging at home - both cars have about the same battery capacity, but that capacity goes further in actual range on the Tesla. So expect to save about 15% on electricity with the Tesla over Polestar if you're primarily charging at home. The Polestar does, however, come with 2 free years of charging at Electrify America locations, so if you have any of those convenient to you, it's technically possible to not pay for electricity at all during the first 2 years of ownership or leasing.

Charging while on the road - I have done one long range trip with the Polestar, and the experience was pretty nerve-wrecking and just all around horrible. This is where Tesla wins hands down - they have reliable charging stations that are well positioned (at least here in Florida) that seem to always be working. Polestar, which can use any of the other, third-party charging stations, is only as good as those stations while away from home. I have found the stations to be poorly positioned, and not working about 50% of the time. Troubleshooting the issues with some of these operators is also a nightmare, as their customer service reps cannot actually fix anything remotely and can only pass the message on to the charging station management and only during business hours (try having 10% battery left and being stranded somewhere on the weekend!). With all of the talk about politicians making more funds available for further expansion of EV charging facilities, I do want to point out one important factor: not only more charging facilities are needed, but there is also a huge issue with their upkeep and maintanence. What good are all these EV chargers if half of them are not working at any given time? (I have experienced both instances of individual chargers not working within an EV charging area as well as entire charging areas being offline/not operating).

Build Quality - There is a lot of posts out there about the initial quality issues when it comes to the Tesla. When I was picking up my car, I made sure to watch out for all of them and none of them seemed present in my vehicle. There were also no issues with the Polestar. I will say, however, that the quality of the materials is significantly higher on the Polestar. The Tesla M3 interior seems much cheaper and overall in a lower class than the Polestar.

Servicing your vehicle - I've experienced issues with both vehicles and each needed to be left at the station for several days. Polestar offered me an Enterprise Rental (available right away) and I was ultimately given a PS2 loaner vehicle (they don't have a lot of these, but I got lucky). Tesla also has a shortage of loaners, but they don't supplement that with rental cars - instead they issue you uber credits. While the $100/day uber credit may seem generous at first, it doesn't quiet go as far as one might think. Also, it's not nearly as convenient as having an actual car, unless you live in a city and have issues with parking. Lastly, the uber credit only covers the fee for the actual ride and not the tips, as I found out after getting my credit card statement :( I also found Tesla's system of communicating with you about what's going on with your vehicle as they service it pretty annoying - they insist on communicating with you primarily through the Tesla app. So you send a message and then wait for a response, which can sometime take a day. Polestar uses a more traditional system and you can actually call and speak with someone to inquire as to the status of your car. Expect to have an extended wait for the service to be completed with either car though, as the cars are put in a queue to be troubleshot remotely by technicians/engineers somewhere in a corporate office (or home). Both cars needed parts replaced that were not on any backorder and were in stock, but the process took considerably longer than it would with a traditional car. As a matter of fact, I had a similar issue with the Polestar that I've had not so long ago with a Volvo (the part was common between the two), but while the part for the Volvo was replaced on the same day, I waited 4 days for the process of troubleshooting and ultimately replacing the part for the Polestar.

Other quirks/annoyances - I prefer the driver's display above the steering wheel that the Polestar has over the all-in-one screen set up of the Tesla. One of my biggest annoyances is the inability to quickly tell what time it is on a Tesla - the clock is in such small font and so far away from me that I can barely see it. I also prefer the navigation system in the Polestar (google maps) over the one in Tesla. The Tesla does use the maps from Google, but the actual interface is done by Tesla and it's not as user friendly or intuitive.

Interior Storage - What the Tesla does great, however, are the various storage compartments in the cabin of the car. There is a serious lack of space in the Polestar, while the Tesla offers a number of very generously-sized compartments. The Polestar also only has one cup holder upfront, which is pretty annoying if you are traveling with someone else in the vehicle. The only thing that makes the Polestar cabin storage upfront better is that you're able to open up the glove box by hand as you typically would in other cars. In the Tesla, you have to open the glovebox by going through a menu on the main touchscreen, which is less than ideal.

Trunk storage - I prefer the Polestar's trunk over Tesla - it's more user friendly and has much better accessibility, esp. for taller people. I've hit my head on the top of the trunk lid while it was open several times on the Tesla, and overall the opening of the Trunk is pretty small and inconvenient. Because the Polestar is a hatchback, the trunk is almost like on an SUV. The pop-up divider/organizer built in to the Polestar trunk is also very convenient, and find myself using it a lot more often than I thought I would.

Insurance cost - I have a teenager in my household, and I live in South Florida where insurance rates are pretty high to begin with, but in my experience the Tesla costs twice as much to insure as the Polestar, so be warned and definitely get a quote for both vehicles if deciding between the two.

I'm sure I have other things to share which I can't think of at the moment, but if anyone has any specific questions with regards to how a particular feature/function compares between the two vehicles, feel free to let me know and I'll try my best to respond.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
Not trying to change your position, just giving you my observations. ChargePoint here sucks even worse than EA. Personally if I had to do more than 4 trips a year to SoCal, I would have definitely gone with a Tesla.

Is that Coronado Island in San Diego? If so, very beautiful city. If you are ever in the Silicon Valley area, drop me a line!

Will do. Haven’t been to the SF/Berkeley area in a long time, but really enjoy Marin County. Some of my college buddies are retired MD’s living in Marin, and occasionally stop in….fabulous area. My youngest son lives/works in Seattle (software) and my wife and I are seriously thinking of returning to the West Coast to permanent live…TBD……Maybe north of Seattle, closer to Vancouver for the ocean vistas, or possibly along the Oregon Coast (just came back from there a few weeks ago). I miss the west Coast.

Yes, Coronado, while called “Coronado Island”, it technically is not an island. It has two ways on/off…the Coronado-SD bridge and a small strip (with a road) of land between Coronado and Imperial beach. That encloses the Southern stretch of the San Diego Bay. Also, home of the Navy Seals Command & Training Center for the Pasific. Absolutely a fabulous place to go to Middle and high school and hang out at the beach (which was 3 blocks from my parents house). With all that beach time, I’m still amazed that things turned out as well as they did for me (educationally and financially). Could have easily turned into a beach bum. 😎

As an aside, our P2 is “officially” my wife’s car, but of late, I have been driving it a lot, and have to say, I’ve become addicted to instantaneous response. Looking forward to the performance upgrade sometime this Fall. I’m coming from a 2021 Porsche 911/992S (that’s my daily driver when not in the P2), and in many ways, I prefer the P2. For real, I really have become hooked on EV…and I thought I never would, as I am a hard-core ICE guy. Funny how opinions change.

Cheers, and talk later.
 

·
Registered
2022 PoleStar 2 - Dual Motors - Void
Joined
·
399 Posts
Will do. Haven’t been to the SF/Berkeley area in a long time, but really enjoy Marin County. Some of my college buddies are retired MD’s living in Marin, and occasionally stop in….fabulous area. My youngest son lives/works in Seattle (software) and my wife and I are seriously thinking of returning to the West Coast to permanent live…TBD……Maybe north of Seattle, closer to Vancouver for the ocean vistas, or possibly along the Oregon Coast (just came back from there a few weeks ago). I miss the west Coast.

Yes, Coronado, while called “Coronado Island”, it technically is not an island. It has two ways on/off…the Coronado-SD bridge and a small strip (with a road) of land between Coronado and Imperial beach. That encloses the Southern stretch of the San Diego Bay. Also, home of the Navy Seals Command & Training Center for the Pasific. Absolutely a fabulous place to go to Middle and high school and hang out at the beach (which was 3 blocks from my parents house). With all that beach time, I’m still amazed that things turned out as well as they did for me (educationally and financially). Could have easily turned into a beach bum. 😎

As an aside, our P2 is “officially” my wife’s car, but of late, I have been driving it a lot, and have to say, I’ve become addicted to instantaneous response. Looking forward to the performance upgrade sometime this Fall. I’m coming from a 2021 Porsche 911/992S (that’s my daily driver when not in the P2), and in many ways, I prefer the P2. For real, I really have become hooked on EV…and I thought I never would, as I am a hard-core ICE guy. Funny how opinions change.

Cheers, and talk later.
I grew up in Los Angeles, and had a friend who lived in San Diego in the 90's. We would go visiting and stay with him for the weekend whenever we had a chance. I absolutely love SD. Moved to the Bay Area in 2001 to join a medical device Incubator as their IT Manager, the plan was to work out here for a couple of year, make some silicone Valley type money and go back...but my wife and I ended up staying here and never looked back. I live in San Jose, but frequently visit SoCal as I have two brothers, two sisters and my father still residing there.

I'm an enthusiast with 30 years of driving. Let's just say that when I was 17, Miami Vice was my favorite show and Molly Ringwald was at the top of her acting game! 25 years of Toyota/Lexus ownership, and now I'm almost 100 percent EV's! In 2020 leased my wife a Hyundai Ioniq EV for her commute, and now am leasing my current Polestar. I'll never buy another ICE, ever again
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
I'll never buy another ICE, ever again

I’m getting there. So far, our experience with the p2, has been very transformative for my wife and I.

While recently visiting our son in Seattle, we headed off to an Ironman competition in Salem, Oregon that he was competing In. Afterwards, the 4 of us drove about 800-1,000 miles through Oregon (wine country and coast) in his P2. That’s when I stopped worrying about range anxiety, and actually started looking forward to charging up, while getting a glass of wine or coffee 😁
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
I'm an enthusiast with 30 years of driving. Let's just say that when I was 17, Miami Vice was my favorite show and Molly Ringwald was at the top of her acting game!
@AMIRZA786, you might be happy to know that Molly Ringwald lives in our village and our older kid is in the same grade as her twins :)
 

·
Registered
2022 PoleStar 2 - Dual Motors - Void
Joined
·
399 Posts
@AMIRZA786, you might be happy to know that Molly Ringwald lives in our village and our older kid is in the same grade as her twins :)
Excellent! I was a big fan in the day. When I was in HS, Patricia Arquette was in my homeroom, and her two brothers went to the same school. Her older sister was already a star, and she had already started in one of Nightmare on Elm street movies. She was dating Nicholas Cage, and I got to meet him. All I can say about Nick Cage...Nick Cage plays Nick Cage really well :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I wrote a comparison on the Model Y to the Polestar 2 (and my Model S) last year on here. Not exactly apples to apples, but I think a comparison to the 3 would have been similar on several fronts.
2021 Polestar 2 vs. 2021 Tesla Model Y vs. 2013 Model S P85+

Interestingly, since I wrote that review, I've sold my Model S and my next door neighbor bought a Polestar 2! He has the leather and definitely agree those seats are much nicer (look and comfort) than those in the Teslas and the other seat options in the Polestar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
345 Posts
I personally think the P3 will be a top seller in the SUV EV market. Compared to the current Tesla Y, which quite frankly looks dated and homly looking, ie, a rounded bean shape, the Polestar 3 will shine…if only from a looks/ascetic perspective.

There is zero doubt that, at least from the inside, the Polestar fit and finish, as well as materials used, crush Tesla’s. Not just my opinion, but several friends I have in the car business. But time will tell how well both interiors hold up to regular use? My very first take when I sat in, and then test drove a Polestar was - “It looks and feels like an upscale European sedan” (high praise, in my book), while the Tesla’s do not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
I personally think the P3 will be a top seller in the SUV EV market. Compared to the current Tesla Y, which quite frankly looks dated and homly looking, ie, a rounded bean shape, the Polestar 3 will shine…if only from a looks/ascetic perspective.

There is zero doubt that, at least from the inside, the Polestar fit and finish, as well as materials used, crush Tesla’s. Not just my opinion, but several friends I have in the car business. But time will tell how well both interiors hold up to regular use? My very first take when I sat in, and then test drove a Polestar was - “It looks and feels like an upscale European sedan” (high praise, in my book), while the Tesla’s do not.
I mean it better since the P3 should compete with the Model X both in size, class and price. The P4 is what would be in the segment of the Model Y.

As for holding up I’ve been in very early Polestar 2s that have been rental cars since then that were holding up very nicely so I think they would be better than the Teslas that use very poor plastic in some interior areas.
 
41 - 60 of 123 Posts
Top