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Awfully suspicious timing for Twittermobile to “open up” their connector after years of everyone else moving toward J1772 - not just pure BEV’s but PHEV’s also.

Tesla wanted a proprietary connector, and by golly they got one. Now that there’s an opportunity for them get back on the taxpayer dole, “Oh, look at our our gift to mankind!”

[insert inappropriate reciprocating hand gesture]
 

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Actually quite a shrewd move. Instead of actually doing the thing you need to do to get the tax dollars you turn it around and suddenly make your proprietary plug "available" and then claim "everyone can use it, so we should get tax money". PR people love that kind of move - it gets ink (after all anything Tesla/Elon gets ink) it can be made look cooperative when its anything but - after all non tesla would not still be able to use the superchargers for the time being. It costs nothing to offer it (instead of actually having to retrofit the real chargers in the real world). And best of all, if the other manufacturers balk at it (having just spent hundreds of millions actually following the standard) he will then accuse them of "insisting on an inferior technology". What's not to love.
There is a reason I have a Polestar and not a Tesla. I am sure you can tell. I will not support this manchild. /rant
 

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Seems like this is just the physical connectors and every vehicle manufacturer and charging network operator still has to figure out their own communication protocols and software.
Both the connectors and the protocols are standardized by IEC 62196 and 61851-24.
 

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Really hoping our tax dollars aren't going to Elon over this, especially if funding is to be allocated proportionately amongst infrastructure market share. But I wouldn't be surprised if it was and touted as a long term strategy, current adopters/manufacturers be damned.
 

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If you didn’t have the CCS already and had to pick between the two, you wouldn’t think the Tesla system is better? V4 Superchargers will have a dual cable or something so it’s not really a point that matters yet, but I see no disadvantages to the Superchargers other than the lead is too short. Traveling the country it has been very obvious which spots I’d rather be charging. My biggest surprise with the Tesla Supercharger expansion is that they still don’t think a bathroom is necessary.
 

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From Amazon to Ticketmaster, we continue to see the damage monopolization has across different industries. Giving Tesla a taxpayer-fueled method to further solidify their grip on marketshare and be the technological overlord of the entire future NA vehicle market is the last thing we need.

They opened up the standard, but they are at third base already with their entire network, and a charging technology they created and will no doubt continue to dominate the direction of its evolution.

Surely neither the government regulators nor the competing vehicle manufacturers will just trust that Tesla will make decisions that prioritize the greater good, and not their competitive edge, right?
 

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I am not saying that Tesla should own all chargers, but there should only be one type of plug and we should choose the best option.

CCS is a brutal cable for the average person to handle, especially in the cold, plus they seem to be broken way too often.
 

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I am not saying that Tesla should own all chargers, but there should only be one type of plug and we should choose the best option.
But any charger network that gets incentives from the government that is intended for public use should be open to everyone and not limited to one manufacturer and charging cost should be the same for everyone. (It’s OK of a car manufacturer to subsidize the rate or a charger network to give members discounts as long as it is not restricted to a single manufacturer.)

Imho, for antitrust reasons, I also think that charging networks should be separate corporate entities from car manufacturers. I’m not sure if that is the case or not currently.

I think what Tesla originally did was fine but as the market has grown, and the interest the government has in promoting EVs, that it’s time for the laws to change.
 

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If you didn’t have the CCS already and had to pick between the two, you wouldn’t think the Tesla system is better? V4 Superchargers will have a dual cable or something so it’s not really a point that matters yet, but I see no disadvantages to the Superchargers other than the lead is too short. Traveling the country it has been very obvious which spots I’d rather be charging. My biggest surprise with the Tesla Supercharger expansion is that they still don’t think a bathroom is necessary.
Their current supercharger cables are overheating with modest output (~250kW). Meanwhile CCS is rated to be able to handle a sustained 500A output, and there are already vehicles drawing 325kW sustained (Hummer) on CCS without derating from the charger/cable side.

The "claimed" performance of the NACS is 1MW charging but, along with a lot of other Elon promises, is yet to be seen.

The form factor is smaller, certainly, and it works really well with the direct integration with Tesla's vehicles. How well will it work or how well will it be supported once it's opened up to other vehicles? Who knows...

If your only concern is form factor then 100%, the tesla style connector wins handily.
 

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I do think form factor is what matters most. The amperage can easily be increased later assuming the batteries can accept the power. V4 Supercharger is estimated at 300-350/(387)kW. The recent Tesla Supercharger cables also have the cooling in the charge cable.
 

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I do think form factor is what matters most. The amperage can easily be increased later assuming the batteries can accept the power. V4 Supercharger is estimated at 300-350kW. The recent Tesla Supercharger cables also have the cooling in the charge cable.
You say that, but form factor naturally limits the physics side of things.

If the form factor is too small, they won't be able to keep it cool. They could also potentially have issues with high voltage considering the insulation requirements at 1kV and how close the conductors are to each other.

Sure the spec claims they can do it, but I'm just going to wait and see. They do happen to claim a lot of things. FSD has been promised every year since... 2014?
 

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Their current supercharger cables are overheating with modest output (~250kW). Meanwhile CCS is rated to be able to handle a sustained 500A output, and there are already vehicles drawing 325kW sustained (Hummer) on CCS without derating from the charger/cable side.
You're mixing amps and kW here. CCS is rated up to 500A. With 400V systems (e.g. PS2 and 3) CCS can deliver up to 200kw, while 800V systems (Taycan, Lucid, Ioniq, Hummer) can pull up to 400kW.
 

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You're mixing amps and kW here. CCS is rated up to 500A. With 400V systems (e.g. PS2 and 3) CCS can deliver up to 200kw, while 800V systems (Taycan, Lucid, Ioniq, Hummer) can pull up to 400kW.
I am not.

The new Tesla claim is 1kV at 1,000 amps. MW charge rate.

I understand the relationship of power, voltage and current. I'm simply explaining that them claiming MW charge rate is dubious considering they're struggling with 250kW sustained charging (which would be around 625A).
 

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I actually have a related stupid questionhow in the world is all that electricity supposed to get to the chargers. ? Say you have a battery of 10 or 20.of those 250kw charges at a rest stop and want more than two or 3 cars being able to charge at the same time? What kind of wires would be needed to get that juice there?
Just wondering about the scalability of all this and impact on the already creaky us infrastructure.
Already cant go a summer without brownout or complete failure .... And that is in New England
Curious?
 

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I actually have a related stupid questionhow in the world is all that electricity supposed to get to the chargers. ? Say you have a battery of 10 or 20.of those 250kw charges at a rest stop and want more than two or 3 cars being able to charge at the same time? What kind of wires would be needed to get that juice there?
Just wondering about the scalability of all this and impact on the already creaky us infrastructure.
Already cant go a summer without brownout or complete failure .... And that is in New England
Curious?
Delta started making 400kW rated chargers that have new SiC chips that can take Medium voltage (13,800V) and step it down directly into a voltage compatible with EV charging, without a transformer. 400kW input at that level will only require 18/16 awg conductors . You can pull a practically endless amount of those off of high tension lines, and do load balancing with the rest of the grid if you are the power operator.
 
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