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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a standard 110v outlet in the garage but am looking to have a ChargePoint installed. I've searched through the forum but haven't seen a definitive answer as to which standard I should purchase. I'm leaning toward 14-50 but are there any considerations that would exclude one or other option?


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Go 14-50. The charger included with the car could plug directly into it.
I agree! If your electrician has to wire this, it could be a bit more expensive since a neutral has to be installed along with the two hot lines. However, this makes the receptacle more useful in the future for other devices as well.

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The other option is the electrician might hardware the ChargePoint (it is one of the options in ChargePoint's installation instructions). It's probably better to have them install a 14-50 receptacle so you could more easily replace the ChargePoint down the line if you decide you want a different charger.
 

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Thank you for the quick replies! 14-50 it is. A line to be run for the charger as our electric panel is in the basement on the other side of the house (< 100 feet). I was just wondering if there was a constraint related to the current wiring (15 year old property) that may impact the choice.
 

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Thank you for the quick replies! 14-50 it is. A line to be run for the charger as our electric panel is in the basement on the other side of the house (< 100 feet). I was just wondering if there was a constraint related to the current wiring (15 year old property) that may impact the choice.
You should be fine. I had my electrician install 4 AWG for the two power lines and 6 AWG for the neutral. Don't recall the gage for the ground wire.
 

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Thank you for the quick replies! 14-50 it is. A line to be run for the charger as our electric panel is in the basement on the other side of the house (< 100 feet). I was just wondering if there was a constraint related to the current wiring (15 year old property) that may impact the choice.
The farther the run the lower the gauge of wire needed, and the more expensive the wire will be as part of the install costs. Remember that electricity is run over many miles without difficulty -- again it just changes the wire gauge needed.
 

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The farther the run the lower the gauge of wire needed, and the more expensive the wire will be as part of the install costs. Remember that electricity is run over many miles without difficulty -- again it just changes the wire gauge needed.
Right-o!

This is handy:

 

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Question on this. Given the charging cord has an adaptor that can already fit the outlets above, do you need to get the charging station? Could you just use the cable with the adaptor that comes with the car?
 

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Question on this. Given the charging cord has an adaptor that can already fit the outlets above, do you need to get the charging station? Could you just use the cable with the adaptor that comes with the car?
I think you can, actually. If you go this route, you'll want to plug it in and leave it plugged in. These outlets aren't really made for frequent plugging and unplugging. Also a good idea to kill the breaker before plugging and unplugging. But once plugged, I think you'd be ok. Maybe get a hose rack to store the cable when not using it. Of course, if you're going on long drives, you'll want the cable with you in the car just in case.
 
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I think you can, actually. If you go this route, you'll want to plug it in and leave it plugged in. These outlets aren't really made for frequent plugging and unplugging. Also a good idea to kill the breaker before plugging and unplugging. But once plugged, I think you'd be ok. Maybe get a hose rack to store the cable when not using it. Of course, if you're going on long drives, you'll want the cable with you in the car just in case.
Thanks for the quick feedback. I am still debating if I use home charging. I had an electrician come by and given the location of the panel he would have to go under the house diagonal to the garage and then under the sidewalk (luckily there are conduits). Said it would be about $1,500. I have not yet decided if it is needed.
 

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I think you can, actually. If you go this route, you'll want to plug it in and leave it plugged in. These outlets aren't really made for frequent plugging and unplugging. Also a good idea to kill the breaker before plugging and unplugging. But once plugged, I think you'd be ok. Maybe get a hose rack to store the cable when not using it. Of course, if you're going on long drives, you'll want the cable with you in the car just in case.
I couldn't have said it better myself.
 

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Thanks for the quick feedback. I am still debating if I use home charging. I had an electrician come by and given the location of the panel he would have to go under the house diagonal to the garage and then under the sidewalk (luckily there are conduits). Said it would be about $1,500. I have not yet decided if it is needed.
A 110v outlet can be used, but you may find it insufficient. Overnight you'll only get about 50-60 miles of charge in the car. If that's all you drive everyday you can manage. But if you take longer trips and come home dry, it will take you a long time to top the battery up.
 

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A 110v outlet can be used, but you may find it insufficient. Overnight you'll only get about 50-60 miles of charge in the car. If that's all you drive everyday you can manage. But if you take longer trips and come home dry, it will take you a long time to top the battery up.
Yeah, I used to have an i3 and that is pretty consistent with how I did it then, I would charge when I got to work as well. We will see How this goes...
 

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Thanks for the quick feedback. I am still debating if I use home charging. I had an electrician come by and given the location of the panel he would have to go under the house diagonal to the garage and then under the sidewalk (luckily there are conduits). Said it would be about $1,500. I have not yet decided if it is needed.
FWIW, the $1500 sounds in line with the work. I paid $1000 extra for mine as part of a larger project.

If you live in a place where you can pull your own permit, if you already have some of the skills or can learn them, and if you have space in your breaker box (your service entrance), it's not all that difficult a job to do yourself. Just be aware that there are lots of rules in the code that you'll have to study up on and that local electrical inspectors can be annoyed by having to inspect homeowner's work.
 

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FWIW, the $1500 sounds in line with the work. I paid $1000 extra for mine as part of a larger project.

If you live in a place where you can pull your own permit, if you already have some of the skills or can learn them, and if you have space in your breaker box (your service entrance), it's not all that difficult a job to do yourself. Just be aware that there are lots of rules in the code that you'll have to study up on and that local electrical inspectors can be annoyed by having to inspect homeowner's work.
And you have to comfortable with messing with 240v circuits. Because any mistakes with that will knock you on your a$$. Personally I'm willing to do small 110v jobs downstream from the box, but in my mind this is a more significant job for a professional.
 

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The advantage of hardwiring the ChargePoint Flex is that you can get more current through it. Mine will be on a 70A breaker and hardwired so I can get the full 11kW of charging. A 14-50 plug can't handle that much current - 50A breaker with 40A of current. If you look at the documentation that comes with the charger, the 3 highest charge rates all require hard-wiring. Here's the table from the manual:
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So you can see that you have to hardwire it to get more than 30mph but it maxes out at 37mph (50A). When I talked to James at Polestar Manhattan early on, he told me that they recommend the Chargepoint Flex so I'm glad that's the one I had ordered already. Mine will be installed by a professional electrician I know tomorrow. I'll take some photos.

If you hardwire it, then it doesn't matter which plug you get - it's coming out anyway. :) I hope this helps.
 

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The advantage of hardwiring the ChargePoint Flex is that you can get more current through it. Mine will be on a 70A breaker and hardwired so I can get the full 11kW of charging. A 14-50 plug can't handle that much current - 50A breaker with 40A of current. If you look at the documentation that comes with the charger, the 3 highest charge rates all require hard-wiring. Here's the table from the manual:
View attachment 2075

So you can see that you have to hardwire it to get more than 30mph but it maxes out at 37mph (50A). When I talked to James at Polestar Manhattan early on, he told me that they recommend the Chargepoint Flex so I'm glad that's the one I had ordered already. Mine will be installed by a professional electrician I know tomorrow. I'll take some photos.

If you hardwire it, then it doesn't matter which plug you get - it's coming out anyway. :) I hope this helps.
Basically true. But anything more than about 20 mph is really overkill. Unless you frequently plan on coming home empty and then having to go back out on a long trip the next morning. And on the off chance that's necessary, that's what fast chargers are for. Save your money and get a smaller plugin unit that you can easily take with you when you move.
 

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I prefer hard wiring as well, just cleaner and it takes all of ten minutes to switch equipment. I’m comfortable with wiring and have the tools though, I don’t blame anyone for wanting an outlet that can be multipurpose.
 

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The advantage of hardwiring the ChargePoint Flex is that you can get more current through it.
Good point; this is the trade-off.

At home I’ve only ever used my Model 3 with Tesla’s Mobile Connector 14-50 and so home charge at 40A. It was more than fast enough for my needs (and plenty faster than the public ChargePoint connectors around here).

(I’m also slightly biased in that I find the ChargePoint Flex pretty ugly for something that’d be visible outdoors in my carport — I have no idea why a charger needs multiple greys and colors — so just will be using Polestar’s charger until I find something nicer. But if I were charging inside a garage I wouldn’t mind it.)
 
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