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For the Polestar 2, an affordable and easy to use home charging setup is what i'm after. It will be my first EV and i'm hoping that more experienced owners can chime in on what charging stations they've installed or plan to in the near future. Along with any details on amps, capacity (KW), charge time, installation, cost, etc.

Polestar recommends the home charging options:
  • Wallbox 3.7 kW (0-100% in 24 hours)
  • Wallbox 11 kW (0-100% in 8 hours)
 

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We have a 7 kW Pod Point (FOC when we got SWMBO’s Leaf)

When I get an EV I will probably get a Zappi as we also have PV panels (& PW2) so it makes sense to have a charger that is also capable of only using the excess solar produced instead of sending it back to the grid.

Most domestic households can only charge up to 7 kW,
22 kW (and 11 kW) is for 3 phase... so just a handful of domestic houses but mostly commercial buildings.
I had never heard of a Zappi, I'm looking into that one.

There is not a Polestar-branded home level 2 charger that I can order, right? We just choose any level 2 charger and have it installed?

I tried searching for a Volvo-branded one and I don't see anything like that either.
 

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For the Polestar 2, an affordable and easy to use home charging setup is what i'm after. It will be my first EV and i'm hoping that more experienced owners can chime in on what charging stations they've installed or plan to in the near future. Along with any details on amps, capacity (KW), charge time, installation, cost, etc.

Polestar recommends the home charging options:
  • Wallbox 3.7 kW (0-100% in 24 hours)
  • Wallbox 11 kW (0-100% in 8 hours)
Hi Darius,
I've enquired about Level 2 charger install. First you need 240VAC routed from your breaker panel to the garage . You may be limited to 10kW depending on how big a breaker you panel can take - age of house is key. I'm limited to a 50 amp breaker. Install by an electrician with permits and NEMA 14/50 socket could add up to $1500 or more depending on distances and placement - if you need a new breaker panel that might be more. I have a 125A service, installed LED lights throughout the house, cook with gas and have a lowish average kilowatt usage. You should be able to get your average monthly usage from your hydro provider - three years may be required. This assists with the breaker size assessment.

Average daily usage is quite low - say 50 kms. Most of the charging will be from home at off peak periods. Most charging will likely be from 50% to 90% so no need to beak the bank on top end charger. Get to know local area and any Level 3 chargers for quick top up but keep in mind that a high number of Level 3 chargers has a detrimental effect on the battery.
there's an EV influencer on YouTube, Bjorn Nyland in Norway, who has some very good videos on charging various EV types and their performance. Recommend watching these to learn about charging and EV cars in general.

Good luck
Tony
 

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It might be worth distinguishing based on geography here because the regulations and supply differ so much from country to country. Eg I’m pretty sure in the US you have the choice of either 110v or 220v whereas here in the UK it’s just 230v.
I’m about to have a 7.3kW MyEnergi Zappi charge point installed ready for the arrival of my Polestar in September.
 

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I had solar installed with a Powerwall in June and hoping that I can have a Zappi installed in the next month ready for my Polestar
Just need Octopus to get my meter upgraded to a smart one, Covid has stopped them doing the upgrades so far
 

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In the UK 99% of homes just have a single phase 220/240v system. In addition you won't be able to install a breaker bigger than 32A for a home supply. Therefore this is limited to the 7KW.*

In other parts of the world you can get 3 Phase Supply to homes, however you might find some homes are limited to 16A while others can get 32A per phase. So you can get a 7KW or 11KW charger depending on your local house supply.**

There are some people around the world who have a massive incoming supply ... normally because they have a large house, or a large swimming pool plant room, or some other reason like a large farm, etc...
Therefore a 22KW supply is going to be very rare at home without a major upgrade from your electrical supplier or a special case. In addition I wouldn't recommend this vs the cost anyway. Even a 7Kw will charge 100% over 14-15 hours ... and 99.9% of the time you won't arrive home @ 1% battery. Save the cash and get either a 7KW or 11KW at home.
Think of it this way ... a 22KW Charger is the same as the supply to your whole house in the UK!

*Note to get a 32A (7kw) charger at home in the UK you need a min 100A incoming supply. Look where your Meter is and below that should be a fuse with either 63A or 100A written on it. If you have 63A then you'll need to upgrade via your electrical supplier - depending on your location this can cost hundreds or thousands.

**Very much the same as the * above for the UK. Some countries supply 3 phase supplies to houses, but then give you a small incoming breaker. This is normally because the local infrastructure is weak, so they split the demand over 3 phases rather than a bigger single one.


I'm no world wide expert ... but if you are in the UK and want some help please let me know, as I am an Electrical Engineer.
 

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I am waiting for a quote to install an EO mini tethered charger to be used with Octopus Go electricity supply (4 hours 12.30-4.30 am a 5p/kwH daily) I have one of Octopus's smart meters installed.
EO say they will apply a discount to the charger as I am an Octopus.
 

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if you use your car daily then I would totally recommend the Octopus 5p/kwh as long you don't also have a massive house load during the day too.
 

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This is an interesting discussion for sure. I've not really spent much time researching on some of the best home chargers available in the UK yet. Happy to get your opinions/thoughts/feedback 👍.

@GDank - what did you go for and is 11kw supported by many companies? I guess you made it clear 7kw should be more than enough. I may have to change to Octopus if they are offering competitive tarrifs so let's see. Apart from the charger, the app needs to work very well too as that's what we'd be relying on mostly to set timer, UI bits etc.
 

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@GDank - what did you go for and is 11kw supported by many companies? I guess you made it clear 7kw should be more than enough. I may have to change to Octopus if they are offering competitive tarrifs so let's see. Apart from the charger, the app needs to work very well too as that's what we'd be relying on mostly to set timer, UI bits etc.
Step 1. Go to your electrical incoming box where the meter is normally.
Step 2. Open.
Step 3. Look for one of these:-

Single Phase (also note down if a 100A or a 60/63A Fuse)
290


Three Phase (also note down if a 100A or a 60/63A Fuse)
291

* If 60/63A then you will need to upgrade anyway.

Like I said before most UK houses are single phase, however it is possible depending on where you live and/or size of house/land you could have 3 Phase.

If only Single Phase you will only be able to get 7kw.
If Three Phase you will be able to get 11kw

Now you might be able to upgrade to 3 Phase by speaking to your supplier, however be prepared for a large cost could be £500 ... could be x10 that. I suspect around £1500.

Again, a 7KW charger will charge about 23 miles per hour, so unless you are doing 200+ miles per day and only charging for 8 hours at night*, do you really need an 11Kw at home, let alone a 22kw?

*Ok there is some logic here if you are on a 5p/kw between midnight and 5am ... you only have 5 hours of cheap electricity. But that's still 115 miles you need to use per day @ 7kw. And at 22kw that 5 hours would give you 185 Miles. So the question is ... what is your realistic daily use? If really over 120 miles per day then yeah might be worth the 22kw and then get a cheap off peak rate of 5p/kw for 5 hours.

Info Here : Polestar 2 (2020) Charging Guide | Pod Point

Step 4 : Where is your distribution board compared to where you want the charger? Most companies allow 10m of cable from the DB to the Charger.

Step 5 : Does your Distribution board have a spare breaker slots?

This one below is totally full ... but if there is no switch (ie breaker) in a slot, the answer is yes you have a spare.
292


Once you know your incoming size, if you have space on your DB, and where the location of the Charger is in relation to the DB, then you have all the info you need to contact a Charger Supplier/Installer.


If you do not have space on your Distribution Board, there are several ways to tackle it ... don't worry it's not hard just might cost another few hundred pounds.
 

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if you use your car daily then I would totally recommend the Octopus 5p/kwh as long you don't also have a massive house load during the too.
This is a good point. I am already a very heavy night time user because I have night storage heating (awful, but it’s an early 90s house with no gas).. that’s why I’ve opted for the Zappi charger because it will monitor the total consumption by the house and ensure I don’t exceed the rating of the main fuse.
 

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Step 1. Go to your electrical incoming box where the meter is normally.
Step 2. Open.
Step 3. Look for one of these:-

Single Phase (also note down if a 100A or a 60/63A Fuse)
View attachment 290

Three Phase (also note down if a 100A or a 60/63A Fuse)
View attachment 291
* If 60/63A then you will need to upgrade anyway.

Like I said before most UK houses are single phase, however it is possible depending on where you live and/or size of house/land you could have 3 Phase.

If only Single Phase you will only be able to get 7kw.
If Three Phase you will be able to get 11kw or 22kw.

Now you might be able to upgrade to 3 Phase by speaking to your supplier, however be prepared for a large cost could be £500 ... could be x10 that. I suspect around £1500.

Again, a 7KW charger will charge about 23 miles per hour, so unless you are doing 200+ miles per day and only charging for 8 hours at night*, do you really need an 11Kw at home, let alone a 22kw?

*Ok there is some logic here if you are on a 5p/kw between midnight and 5am ... you only have 5 hours of cheap electricity. But that's still 115 miles you need to use per day @ 7kw. And at 22kw that 5 hours would give you 185 Miles. So the question is ... what is your realistic daily use? If really over 120 miles per day then yeah might be worth the 22kw and then get a cheap off peak rate of 5p/kw for 5 hours.

Info Here : Polestar 2 (2020) Charging Guide | Pod Point

Step 4 : Where is your distribution board compared to where you want the charger? Most companies allow 10m of cable from the DB to the Charger.

Step 5 : Does your Distribution board have a spare breaker slots?

This one below is totally full ... but if there is no switch (ie breaker) in a slot, the answer is yes you have a spare.
View attachment 292

Once you know your incoming size, if you have space on your DB, and where the location of the Charger is in relation to the DB, then you have all the info you need to contact a Charger Supplier/Installer.


If you do not have space on your Distribution Board, there are several ways to tackle it ... don't worry it's not hard just might cost another few hundred pounds.
Thanks a lot 👍 very elaborate and technical too! Will check incoming box tomorrow and see what it says. Distribution board has a spare which is great and is less than 10m to my 2nd preferred location for the charger so that's ok too. Think my garage has a small DB too but don't think there's a spare.
Thanks a lot for the useful info 👌👍
 

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I have a Juicebox 40 for my Ipace. It's a bit overkill for the Ipace which max out at 7kW. A 32 Amp would have sufficed. A 40 amp should do 11kW if the onboard charger allows. The Juicebox has wifi, tracks session and lifetime totals. Able to set amount of charge and time of use.
 

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I only have a 30amp circuit available in my garage and have a Clipper Creek unit that maxes out at 5.8kw. That provides about 20mph of charging. Cost of electricity is not an issue for me, so I charge and top off whenever I'm home. But unless you are driving 150+ miles/day, and/or coming home empty all the time, even 20mph is plenty of juice.

I guess I could envision a scenario where you come home from a long trip, your car is near empty, and then you have some emergency that requires you to leave the house again. But that's where your local L3 charger comes in handy.
 

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Has anyone installed a home charger in the US prior to car’s arrival. Need help as I am an EV newbie.
Yes. Chargepoint Flex. Since my main panel (service entrance) is full, I'll need a new subpanel. In the US, constant current is limited to 80% of the circuit capacity. Thus, you can charge at 40 amps on a 50 amp circuit. Most houses have 220 coming in (two 110 volt lines that are out of phase). Most of our electrical stuff uses one line and a neutral or 110 volts, but a few items (clothes dryer, central SC, electric range) use the full 220. Your EV will do best with a level 2 charger (220 volts) running at 40 amps yielding 8.8 kW.
 

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Has anyone installed a home charger in the US prior to car’s arrival. Need help as I am an EV newbie.
Just went through this. Installed a ChargePoint Flex on a new 50A circuit, which should charge a P*2 from 0% to full overnight.

Key decision points:
0- Hire a licensed electrician. Per mrs. polerad, this is not the time to DIY it.
0.1- Save your receipts so the gov't gives you 30% of your costs back as a tax credit.

1- How many amps? This determines which equipment to get.
A new 50A circuit is the most you really need as it handles charging a P*2 full in in 8-9 hrs. For a Tesla P100D, that would charge it from empty to full in <12 hours.
My utility demanded special justification to install anything more than 50A, and you'd be paying a premium for the charging equipment too.

Another common option is a 40A circuit (32A operating), which would fully charge the P*2 in <12 hrs, or a P100D in <15 hrs.

If you have a newer, 200A main service panel, you can likely easily handle a new 50A circuit, or anything less.
If you have a 100A panel, you may need to deal with less amps, or upgrade your service.
Either way the electrician will do a load calculation to help decide the max you can put in.


2- Where?
If outside, you'll likely want/need a hard-wired install.
Most equipment isn't rated for outdoors installs without it being hardwired. And even if they do, you're looking at a GFCI circuit which can make the job more expensive. Generally the hard-wired boxes are cheaper than wired and it seems to be less labor for the electrician. Also, you can get a much cleaner look on an outside wall if you hardwire it through a breakout opening on the back of the box (ChargePoint has this, others don't).
But if outside, that box will always be there, which may run afoul of HOA busybodies.

If inside and a 2-car garage, consider putting it in the middle so it can access either bay. Most charging cables are 22-25 ft, so could reach the charging port of most any EV regardless of port location, assuming you don't have a massive garage. Even if it's to the side, you can make it work, but center gives maximal flexibility.


3- Hardwired or outlet-based? If outlet, which?
If you already have a 240V outlet on a circuit with enough amps, just use that and get equipment with the appropriate plug. If your electric dryer is in the garage, consider using a DryerBuddy.
Though keep in mind a lot of equipment can be mounted max 3 ft from the outlet due to regulations, in case the outlet is not near your parking spot.

If you think you might move later or for some reason anticipate having to change out the equipment, put in an outlet. Most common outlets are NEMA14-50 or NEMA6-50. The choice between those two doesn't really matter but most seem to do NEMA14-50.
If you go with an outlet, you're limited to a 50A circuit, which isn't all that much a limitation.
Also, in principle, you can use a travel charger (which maybe comes with the P*2?) instead of having to purchase separate equipment. But, it's not recommended to constantly unplug/replug into NEMA14-50 outlets as they're not really designed for that, so you might wear out the connections over time. Though, some folks just do this. YMMV.

Else, if you're installing outside, or are unlikely to move the box after install, consider doing a hardwired install. It's likely cheaper and less complicated.


4- Which equipment?
First note that EVSE equipment is rated according to amps it can take in and feed though. This rating is 0.8 * the circuit rating - so 40A for a 50A circuit, 32A for a 40A circuit, and so on. You generally pay more for equipment with a higher circuit rating. But if you put 40A rated EVSE equipment on a 40A circuit, you're only going to actually get 32A out. SFYL.
An EVSE is basically a fancy extension cord that has the right plug (J1772) on the end to connect to your car.
The car manages the charging, including when to stop charging (based on how you set it) and the P*2 app promises the ability to monitor and manage charging remotely.
So you really don't need anything fancier than an extension cord with indicator LEDs, like this: 32A Level 2 EVSE AmazingE FAST with NEMA 14-50 | Powered by ClipperCreek
That said, if you want to take advantage of reduced charges from your utility at different times of day, it's not clear that the Polestar app helps with that, so you'll want the equipment to have some sort of app for that.
On Amazon there are a bunch of cheap options, but watch out as most of the cheap ones haven't been certified for electrical safety by the usual orgs. These might save you a couple hundred bucks, but I wasn't willing to risk an electrical fire over that, especially as this is a taxpayer subsidized purchase.
Trusted brands are ClipperCreek, ChargePoint, and JuiceBox.
ClipperCreek equipment is basically indestructible but generally doesn't have all the bells and whistles like apps, WiFi connectivity, etc so they're usually cheaper without being less quality. They do look plain though.
ChargePoint is kind of becoming the standard and they're used throughout the US in public installations as well. The HomeFlex could be used with whatever range of amps your circuit can provide and the charging can be managed with ChargePoint's app, which you'll likely want to have anyway for public charging. I also liked the ChargePoint looks the best. It is more expensive though.
JuiceBox is similar to ChargePoint, but there are enough Amazon reviews of people having issues with it constantly faulting due to dropping WiFi connections that I wrote it off.
There are others out there like GrizzlE that I didn't really check out.

If you're in the Bay Area I can recommend electricians.
 

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'Wish I had your advice back a couple of months ago, Polerad. Excellent post. 'Agree with everything you wrote.
 

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In addition to the feds, also check your State and utility company for rebates. After I installed mine a couple of years ago the cost was minimal after all the rebates and tax write-offs.
 

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Just went through this. Installed a ChargePoint Flex on a new 50A circuit, which should charge a P*2 from 0% to full overnight.

Key decision points:
0- Hire a licensed electrician. Per mrs. polerad, this is not the time to DIY it.
0.1- Save your receipts so the gov't gives you 30% of your costs back as a tax credit.

1- How many amps? This determines which equipment to get.
A new 50A circuit is the most you really need as it handles charging a P*2 full in in 8-9 hrs. For a Tesla P100D, that would charge it from empty to full in <12 hours.
My utility demanded special justification to install anything more than 50A, and you'd be paying a premium for the charging equipment too.

Another common option is a 40A circuit (32A operating), which would fully charge the P*2 in <12 hrs, or a P100D in <15 hrs.

If you have a newer, 200A main service panel, you can likely easily handle a new 50A circuit, or anything less.
If you have a 100A panel, you may need to deal with less amps, or upgrade your service.
Either way the electrician will do a load calculation to help decide the max you can put in.


2- Where?
If outside, you'll likely want/need a hard-wired install.
Most equipment isn't rated for outdoors installs without it being hardwired. And even if they do, you're looking at a GFCI circuit which can make the job more expensive. Generally the hard-wired boxes are cheaper than wired and it seems to be less labor for the electrician. Also, you can get a much cleaner look on an outside wall if you hardwire it through a breakout opening on the back of the box (ChargePoint has this, others don't).
But if outside, that box will always be there, which may run afoul of HOA busybodies.

If inside and a 2-car garage, consider putting it in the middle so it can access either bay. Most charging cables are 22-25 ft, so could reach the charging port of most any EV regardless of port location, assuming you don't have a massive garage. Even if it's to the side, you can make it work, but center gives maximal flexibility.


3- Hardwired or outlet-based? If outlet, which?
If you already have a 240V outlet on a circuit with enough amps, just use that and get equipment with the appropriate plug. If your electric dryer is in the garage, consider using a DryerBuddy.
Though keep in mind a lot of equipment can be mounted max 3 ft from the outlet due to regulations, in case the outlet is not near your parking spot.

If you think you might move later or for some reason anticipate having to change out the equipment, put in an outlet. Most common outlets are NEMA14-50 or NEMA6-50. The choice between those two doesn't really matter but most seem to do NEMA14-50.
If you go with an outlet, you're limited to a 50A circuit, which isn't all that much a limitation.
Also, in principle, you can use a travel charger (which maybe comes with the P*2?) instead of having to purchase separate equipment. But, it's not recommended to constantly unplug/replug into NEMA14-50 outlets as they're not really designed for that, so you might wear out the connections over time. Though, some folks just do this. YMMV.

Else, if you're installing outside, or are unlikely to move the box after install, consider doing a hardwired install. It's likely cheaper and less complicated.


4- Which equipment?
First note that EVSE equipment is rated according to amps it can take in and feed though. This rating is 0.8 * the circuit rating - so 40A for a 50A circuit, 32A for a 40A circuit, and so on. You generally pay more for equipment with a higher circuit rating. But if you put 40A rated EVSE equipment on a 40A circuit, you're only going to actually get 32A out. SFYL.
An EVSE is basically a fancy extension cord that has the right plug (J1772) on the end to connect to your car.
The car manages the charging, including when to stop charging (based on how you set it) and the P*2 app promises the ability to monitor and manage charging remotely.
So you really don't need anything fancier than an extension cord with indicator LEDs, like this: 32A Level 2 EVSE AmazingE FAST with NEMA 14-50 | Powered by ClipperCreek
That said, if you want to take advantage of reduced charges from your utility at different times of day, it's not clear that the Polestar app helps with that, so you'll want the equipment to have some sort of app for that.
On Amazon there are a bunch of cheap options, but watch out as most of the cheap ones haven't been certified for electrical safety by the usual orgs. These might save you a couple hundred bucks, but I wasn't willing to risk an electrical fire over that, especially as this is a taxpayer subsidized purchase.
Trusted brands are ClipperCreek, ChargePoint, and JuiceBox.
ClipperCreek equipment is basically indestructible but generally doesn't have all the bells and whistles like apps, WiFi connectivity, etc so they're usually cheaper without being less quality. They do look plain though.
ChargePoint is kind of becoming the standard and they're used throughout the US in public installations as well. The HomeFlex could be used with whatever range of amps your circuit can provide and the charging can be managed with ChargePoint's app, which you'll likely want to have anyway for public charging. I also liked the ChargePoint looks the best. It is more expensive though.
JuiceBox is similar to ChargePoint, but there are enough Amazon reviews of people having issues with it constantly faulting due to dropping WiFi connections that I wrote it off.
There are others out there like GrizzlE that I didn't really check out.

If you're in the Bay Area I can recommend electricians.
Very helpful, thanks ! We are building a new home in the coming months. Other than making sure I have a 50 amp circuit with NEMA14-50 plug anything else I should plan on having them do since we havent broken ground yet?.
 
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