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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have just received my P2 here in the San Francisco Bay Area this week. I have never seen another one of these on the road. It definitely takes some getting used to switching from a 4WD MB SUV. I am still cautiously learning. The one problem I have run into is the wheels spinning on wet grade. It is particularly bad in reverse. I had assumed the all wheel drive would work the same as other cars. Is there just too much torque or the wrong type of OEM tires. Is there a trick such as turning off the traction control temporarily? Any advice from others who face a similar difficulty. Otherwise I have been happy with the car (after 3 days).
I do have 20 inch wheels.
 

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Cold day? Our cars come with summer tires which have lousy traction in cold weather. If it's less than 40 degrees Fahrenheit, you need to be cautious. I've got the PP 20" wheels and they slipped some in the cold, damp, and slush. 'Haven't had a problem since putting on winter rubber.
 
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I’m near the South Bay with 19” stock tires (Michelin Primacy4) I haven’t noticed any slip yet but will keep an eye out for it as we get into wetter weather. Pandemic allowing will be trialing it in colder/snowier areas soon too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Cold day? Our cars come with summer tires which have lousy traction in cold weather. If it's less than 40 degrees Fahrenheit, you need to be cautious. I've got the PP 20" wheels and they slipped some in the cold, damp, and slush. 'Haven't had a problem since putting on winter rubber.

Yes, but since I live in California one never changes tires. You just use all season all year round. To be fair, our driveway is a very steep grade, and that is where I notice it. On the flip side, a Toyota Corolla can drive up it without any problem.
Is it possible that 4 wheel drive EV's are intrinsically different that gasoline ones? I had a lighter small MB SUV with 4 wheel drive that never did this once. I am wondering if it comes down to the tires. I may have to switch to winter tires for our three months rainy season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I’m near the South Bay with 19” stock tires (Michelin Primacy4) I haven’t noticed any slip yet but will keep an eye out for it as we get into wetter weather. Pandemic allowing will be trialing it in colder/snowier areas soon too.

Let me know how it works up in the mountains when you go. I never worried about by 250 GLK up at Tahoe. Now I am a little concerned.
 

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Yes, but since I live in California one never changes tires. You just use all season all year round. To be fair, our driveway is a very steep grade, and that is where I notice it. On the flip side, a Toyota Corolla can drive up it without any problem.
Is it possible that 4 wheel drive EV's are intrinsically different that gasoline ones? I had a lighter small MB SUV with 4 wheel drive that never did this once. I am wondering if it comes down to the tires. I may have to switch to winter tires for our three months rainy season.
My driveway also has a very steep grade, and I noticed less grip in the cold and wet with the summer tires. After putting on all-season tires, that problem went away. I haven't had any slipping since.
 
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My driveway also has a very steep grade, and I noticed less grip in the cold and wet with the summer tires. After putting on all-season tires, that problem went away. I haven't had any slipping since.
Thanks. I hate to have to buy 4 new tires for a brand new car.
 

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Thanks. I hate to have to buy 4 new tires for a brand new car.
I was not thrilled, and I have opinions about a Swedish(-ish) car company delivering cars with summer tires in December, but in the end I decided I'd rather have the extra traction. I did save the summer tires, so in the spring I'll either swap tires or see if any place wants to buy a set of 4 SportContacts with 10 miles on them :).
 
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Electric cars have almost all their torque available from 0 rpm, can easily spin wheels on steep sf hills in the wet. Might be easier to turn on creep and be really light on the throttle.
 
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The problem is likely to be a combination of summer tyres and the very low profile rubber on our cars, particularly if you have the 20" wheels. I bet your Merc had higher profile tyres which are less stiff and so can find grip better on uneven surfaces. My old Jag XKR was absolutely hopeless on even a bit of slush, whereas our old Vauxhall Corsa (small city car like a Ford Fiesta) with narrow wheels and all-season tyres was completely unstoppable even down to -22C and thick snow (yes, we did get that in the UK, about 10 years ago). If you have a steep slope you might need a set of winter wheels and tyres perhaps. Creep will certainly help.

EVs are, if anything, better than ICE cars for controlling torque, and the accelerator pedal on the Polestar has a very gradual uptake in torque if you're careful. Something like an i3 or Tesla, with an instant torque with the slightest touch of the accelerator, makes for very difficult driving in these conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
BTW: The tires that came with the P2 are Michelin Primacy Tour A/S. I assume that means they are "all season." Enabling the "creep" function helps a little bit, but I was still unable to get up a particular section of the wet driveway today.
 

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Hmm, yes, those Michelins are all season. How annoying.
 

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BTW: The tires that came with the P2 are Michelin Primacy Tour A/S. I assume that means they are "all season." Enabling the "creep" function helps a little bit, but I was still unable to get up a particular section of the wet driveway today.
Which spec do you have? 19"? 20" nonPP? 20" PP?

My 19" nonPP has Michelin Primacy 4 tires, which are confirmed as summer tires. Does yours have the AS or M+S markings?


Separate Q: would relative deflation help to increase traction with presumably a bigger tire patch on the ground? Thinking I could help my case by going to 38 psi or so instead of 41-42?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Which spec do you have? 19"? 20" nonPP? 20" PP?

My 19" nonPP has Michelin Primacy 4 tires, which are confirmed as summer tires. Does yours have the AS or M+S markings?


Separate Q: would relative deflation help to increase traction with presumably a bigger tire patch on the ground? Thinking I could help my case by going to 38 psi or so instead of 41-42?
I like the idea of the lower pressure. I have not even checked the pressure since it was just delivered new. These are 20 inch Michelin Primacy Tour A/S. There us no M+S as I have had on my SUV tires previously. I suppose that is not seen as useful for California where one does not typically ever drive in snow. Looking over tire reviews these are not high up there. Is there a difference in UHP tires which I always had before, or is that just marketing? It is hard to find data on tires purely for wet grip and not snow and ice. It is a pricey risk to replace one's tires and not know if they are going to make a difference :-(
 

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I like the idea of the lower pressure. I have not even checked the pressure since it was just delivered new. These are 20 inch Michelin Primacy Tour A/S. There us no M+S as I have had on my SUV tires previously. I suppose that is not seen as useful for California where one does not typically ever drive in snow. Looking over tire reviews these are not high up there. Is there a difference in UHP tires which I always had before, or is that just marketing? It is hard to find data on tires purely for wet grip and not snow and ice. It is a pricey risk to replace one's tires and not know if they are going to make a difference :-(
Before saying anything further, I'm going to wait until someone who's clearly delved into this more ( @ProfessorCook ) weighs in, complete with diagrams, pics, plots of stress-strain under tension, and a pop quiz for those not paying attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
It seems to relate to high torque and poor grip on a lousy road surface (ancient concrete). I have the creep function activated, although it does not do much on the incline. I ever so lightly touch the accelerator just to the point it starts inching forward and then push no more. It moves to a point before the wheels start to spin. I am coming to the uneasy conclusion I am going to have to switch to winter tires seasonally for the first time ever. Something that may contribute to this problem is that this occurs on a sharp 180 degree curve in the drive with a change in grade. If I go up the hill, do a three point turn and come back down straight in, there is a reduced risk of slippage. So does slip increase when the front tires are turned sharply? Even more frustrating is that I share this drive with a neighbor with a Tesla 3 who does not have any problem.
 

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It seems to relate to high torque and poor grip on a lousy road surface (ancient concrete). I have the creep function activated, although it does not do much on the incline. I ever so lightly touch the accelerator just to the point it starts inching forward and then push no more. It moves to a point before the wheels start to spin. I am coming to the uneasy conclusion I am going to have to switch to winter tires seasonally for the first time ever.
FWIW this past weekend drove my affrimatively summer, 19" wheels on CA9 and CA17, both while wet/raining, with their pretty good grades and curves and I may have been speeding. Never felt like I was loosing traction. temps were a bit warmer, ~50-55F

Might be worth trying the tire pressure thing?

My car was delivered at 34-35 psi all around even though the B pillar sticker indicates 41-42 psi. So I doubt dropping tire pressure for a while would severely harm things, maybe try ~5 psi lower than max? Just might set off the TPMS warning, which you can make go away by starting a recalibration in the settings. If it works just remember not to push the load limits.


Edit: Another thing to try if part of the issue is the concrete and the loss of traction is at the initial bit of incline is putting a rump curb ramp/filler?:
 

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I'm speculating here, but I think lower pressure helps off road (rougher surfaces) and on dry, clean pavement. But I also think it hurts you in the wet and on snow and slush. (Larger contact patch is more likely to lift.)
 

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FWIW this past weekend drove my affrimatively summer, 19" wheels on CA9 and CA17, both while wet/raining, with their pretty good grades and curves and I may have been speeding. Never felt like I was loosing traction. temps were a bit warmer, ~50-55F
Ah, 17 would be fun. Or 84 from Woodside to San Gregorio (my favorite Bay Area twisty-turny drive).

I didn't have any trouble with the summer tires until the temperature got down below about 40ºF. Then I started to feel them start to slip a bit. This fits with the warning on the Continental web site:

"The rubber compound on summer tires is designed for warm weather. As the temperature drops, the rubber stiffens. Even if there is no snow or ice, the tire loses traction. [...] Even on dry roads without ice and snow, winter brings colder temperatures. Summer tires are not built for cold weather. The tire tread will stiffen. In addition to reducing traction, this poses a risk to the tire itself. The tire loses its elasticity and may crack. There's a risk of chipping of the overly stiff thread block. Chipped and cracked tires are not safe to drive on and must be replaced."​

I don't know how serious that danger is, but since we were headed well below freezing at the time (and are only a few degrees above it as I type), I decided to play it safe.
 

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Lowering the tyre pressure a bit will definitely help as not only does the tyre then have a larger contact area with the ground, it will also spread itself over any surface bumps better rather than riding up on them. The ride is also a lot nicer at 38psi! Mine are at 41psi now but I'm seriously considering dropping them back to 38psi for comfort and because I'm a gentle driver and don't need high cornering load, i.e. I don't stress the sidewalls which is why the pressure is set so high.
 
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