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Discussion Starter #1
Not specific to Polestar - anyone who has experience with Tesla or other EVs driving in the snow...

Wondering how it is driving an EV with single gear in the snow..it is pretty hilly where we live, and generally advisable to downshift when descending these hills in snow to minimize the need for braking. Obviously that is not an option, but maybe depending on which mode of regenerative braking you are using it might help (or make things worse?)...

Also, I don't suppose there is a "snow mode" that would alter traction control, torque, etc.?
 

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Winter Tyres are more important than any other factor.

Search for a YouTube video where they put a RWD with winter tyres vs a a 4x4 with sumer tyres. TLDR : the performance RWD won by a mile.

If you are that worried then get Winter Tyres fitted for Dec to Feb
 

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Here in New England, I use winter wheels from Thanksgiving to tax day... Whenever temperatures below 40 F are frequent.
 

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I lived in Alabama for a few years. There, just a dusting was enough to throw society into abject chaos.
 
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As a Canadian, I have to comment!
With one pedal driving, you can avoid brake pedal lockup and losing control. It's the same as downshifting to come in for a stop. The big question is how to start off without wheel spin since you can't start in second gear.
My Tesla driving friends in Montreal tell me the cold s not a problem. Other than a - 20°C day cutting battery life down by half.
 

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My Tesla driving friends in Montreal tell me the cold is not a problem.
Sorry but I beg to differ. I tried my cousin's Model 3 last winter, during a snow storm and was really scared.
Lifting my foot off the throttle on the highway made the car rear end dance in a very concerning way.
Strangely, the Model 3 uses the rear motor for regen, even on an AWD.
Tesla drivers should turn off regen on slippery roads.

Other experiences here : Tesla forum - Youtube rear slip
 

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I would turn off regen completely because it could cause a skid depending on how much you generate. Where as using the brake pedal (while it still makes use of regen) will engage abs and prevent a skid.

Disclaimer: neither ABS or ESC can defy the laws of physics.
 

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I'm sorry to also mention that the extra mass of the Polestar won't help.
 

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There are a lot of interesting videos on YouTube looking at winter driving in Tesla. The traction control systems are the usual setup to cut acceleration to minimize individual wheel spin and apply individual wheel braking to keep the car from overseer or understeer. There were some impressive snow conditions and traction control was very effective. Only one video that I could find with someone using one pedal driving after a snow storm with no problem. The TCS also cuts out the regenerative system briefly to reduce slip in low traction conditions. But that's a Tesla.
We'll be able to compare notes during the winter. Obviously, a good set of winter tires, not all-seasons, are key.
 

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I don't deny that traction control is perfect, the technology is excellent to avoid slip when accelerating. Many videos prove that indeed.

The deal breaker for me, in my test drive, was the high rear-bias on the Model 3. Turning in snowy rural streets, I had a feeling the car was only pushing with the rear motor, with the front wheels only plowing, changing direction slowly, instead of being pulled by traction, and turning effectively.

Rear-bias for regen was also a problem in my opinion. The car was probably correcting the rear slip when decelerating but the sensation I felt was unpleasant nonetheless.
 

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As a Canadian, I have to comment!
With one pedal driving, you can avoid brake pedal lockup and losing control. It's the same as downshifting to come in for a stop. The big question is how to start off without wheel spin since you can't start in second gear.
My Tesla driving friends in Montreal tell me the cold s not a problem. Other than a - 20°C day cutting battery life down by half.
Very interesting to hear this. I've never tried a one-pedal setup in the snow. My brother-in-law has a Leaf that I've driven... but not in the winter.

I love the ability in a stick-shift to down shift and avoid lockup.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
From the owners manual online, not surprising...
https://support.polestar.com/us/polestar-2/2021/search/
"Polestar recommends changing the setting for one-pedal drive to Off or Low to contribute to more stable driving in slippery or icy conditions.
To help optimize traction and roadholding, Polestar recommends using snow tires on all wheels whenever there is a risk of snow or ice on the road."
 

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From the owners manual online, not surprising...
Pure progressive performance | Polestar
"Polestar recommends changing the setting for one-pedal drive to Off or Low to contribute to more stable driving in slippery or icy conditions.
To help optimize traction and roadholding, Polestar recommends using snow tires on all wheels whenever there is a risk of snow or ice on the road."
This is unsurprising. Even in an ICE car, downshifting to slow down in the snow can absolutely cause a skid.
 

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Interestingly, the manual also says this: "Practice driving on slippery surfaces under controlled conditions to learn how the vehicle reacts". I've always taught this to my kids, and I always wondered why it wasn't a mandatory part of driver training. If you don't know what it feels like handling the car in slippery conditions, it's not going to be pretty when you encounter them on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
This is unsurprising. Even in an ICE car, downshifting to slow down in the snow can absolutely cause a skid.
True, but knowing the hills around my home I can make sure I am in the appropriate low gear before descending so the car won't accelerate much, and you can avoid having to brake to control speed. With an EV, braking will be necessary on those hills - not too worried about it, my wife is a good driver - well just be a matter of getting used to the feel of the brakes and applying smoothly and gently....Will definitely have dedicated snow tires put on though...
 

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Interestingly, the manual also says this: "Practice driving on slippery surfaces under controlled conditions to learn how the vehicle reacts". I've always taught this to my kids, and I always wondered why it wasn't a mandatory part of driver training. If you don't know what it feels like handling the car in slippery conditions, it's not going to be pretty when you encounter them on the road.
Around here, you can find winter driving schools where you spend a day driving on ice and snow with an instructor learning how the car feels and how it handles. With the increased mass of the Polestar 2, but the lower center of gravity and better control for each of the wheels, I concur that we would all benefit from such training.
 
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